ACADEMIC CALENDAR
2018-2019

(Practical Aquaculture, Part II - AQUA 4110 (Aquaculture Cage Design & Maintenance)

 

This is an introductory course outlining floating net cages as containment systems for finfish.

 

Introduction to Cage Aquaculture; Cage Type and Design; Cage Collars; Flotation; Net Bags; Mooring of Cages; Predator Devices; Cage Maintenance and Cleaning; Commercially Produced Aquaculture Cages; Care, Maintenance and Use of Ropes; Net Mending and Patching; Cage Construction Project; Flume Tank Observation of Model Cage.

 

Duration - 35 hours

 

(Practical Aquaculture, Part III - SFTY 1101-First Aid)

 

This is the St. John Ambulance standard first aid course which has been created to satisfy the needs of the general business and industrial market.

 

Compulsory Modules; Elective Modules.

 

Duration - 3 days

 

AQUA 0006 (Salmonid Harvesting, Handling & Processing)

 

This course is designed to enable aquaculture workers to gain understanding of the important role harvesting, handling and processing has on product quality and food safety.

 

Harvesting; Handling and Holding; Processing.

 

Duration - 2.5 days

 

AQUA 0014 (Basic Farm Safety)

 

This course is designed to give workers/participants an understanding of the importance of basic farm safety practices and procedures. It includes Occupational Health and Safety (OHS), accident incident reporting, hazards related to various farm systems and activities (e.g. boating, loading and harvesting systems,storage), and safe work procedures.

 

Workplace Health Safety and Compensation Commission (WHSCC); Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S); Hazards; New and Young Workers; Personal Protective Equipment (PPE); Safe Work Practices and Procedures.

 

Prerequisite - WHMIS or SFTY 1104 (WHMIS)

 

Duration - 2.5 days

 

AQUA 4100 (Aquaculture Seminar Series)

 

This course will present selected topics of relevance to the development of the aquaculture industry.

 

Cod Farming; Rainbow Trout; Salmon Farming; Other Marine Finfish; Eel; Fish Food Production; Mussel Culture; Scallop Culture; Other Shellfish; Provincial Government (Aquaculture Mandate); Federal Government (Aquaculture Mandate); The Role of Aquaculture Associations; Student, Faculty, Visiting Lecturer Presentations.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 1.5 hours/week

 

AQUA 4101 (Handling & Processing Aquaculture Products)

 

This course is designed to familiarize aquaculture students with the handling, processing and preservation of Newfoundland & Labrador farmed fish and shellfish.

 

Fisheries Overview; Product Costing; Food Safety and Quality Control; Overview of Sanitation; Farmed White Fleshed Fish Handling and Processing; Farmed Salmon and Trout Handling and Processing; Farmed Blue Mussel Handling and Processing; Sea Scallop Handling and Processing; Oyster Handling and Processing; Secondary Processing.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours per week = 26 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

AQUA 4102 (Shellfish Culture)

 

This course is designed to provide an overview of shellfish culture including mollusk, echinoderm, and crustacean culture techniques.

 

The Status Quo; Mussel Culture; Oyster Culture; Scallop Culture; Culture of Other Mollusca and Echinoderms (Calm, Abalone and Sea Urchin Culture to be examined); Crayfish Culture; Freshwater Prawn Culture; Shrimp Culture; Lobster Culture; Culture of Other Crustaceans; Seaweed Culture; Future Considerations.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

AQUA 4103 (Fish Health)

 

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the epidemiology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of major diseases affecting cultured species (primarily fish). The laboratory component will address various diagnostic and applied techniques essential to fish and shellfish health management.

 

Introduction to the Disease Process; Anatomy and Physiology; Stress and the Disease Process; Immunity; Viral Diseases; Bacterial Diseases; Fungal Diseases; Parasitic Diseases; Non-Infectious Diseases; Disease Control; Legislation; Epidemiology.

 

Lectures - 26 hours (2 hours per week)

 

Laboratories - 39 hours (3 hours per week)

 

AQUA 4104 (Fish Nutrition)

 

This course is designed to provide and understanding of nutrient requirements and feed practices for finfish.

 

Introduction to Fish Nutrition Studies; Feeding Habits and Adaptations; Nutrient Requirements; Diet Formulation; Larval Feeds; Food Requirements; Feeding Practices; Natural Foods in Extensive Culture; Growth and Feeding; Current Developments.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures/Laboratories - 3 per week

 

AQUA 4106 (Practical Aquaculture, Part I - (SFTY 1125 - Small Vessel Operator Proficiency)

 

This course is designed to provide candidates with the skills and knowledge to act as the operator of commercial vessels up to 5 gross tonnage, other than tugs, and fishing vessels, and for fishing vessels up to 15 gross tonnage or 12 meters overall length engaged on a near coastal, class 2 or a sheltered waters voyage.

 

This course has been developed in accordance with the Transport Canada Marine Safety TP 14692 E.

 

Introduction; Terminology; Vessel Hull Types and Configurations; Seamanship; Collision Avoidance Regulations; Stability; Safety on the Job; Marine Weather; Navigation, Positioning Equipment and Installations; Power Boat Operations; Search and Rescue (SAR) Resources; Protection of the Marine Environment; Departure Preparation; Quick Reference Checklists.

 

Duration - 28 hours

 

AQUA 4107 (Finfish Culture)

 

This course is designed to provide an overview of finfish culture including husbandry practices and culture technology for salmonids, marine species and warm water fish.

 

Aquaculture: An Overview; Water Requirements; Salmonids; Marine Species; Warmwater Species.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures or Laboratories - 3 hours once per week AND 2 hours once per week = 65 hours total

 

AQUA 4108 (Site Selection)

 

This course is designed to provide an overview of the criteria for selecting a suitable aquaculture site, including land-based and open-water sites for finfish and shellfish species.

 

Water Requirements; Technical Site Studies; Finfish and Shellfish Farm Planning.

 

Duration - 65 hours total

 

AQUA 4109 (Aquaculture Seminar Series II)

 

This course will present selected topics of relevance to the development of the aquaculture industry.

 

Cod Farming; Rainbow Trout; Salmon Farming; Other Marine Finfish; Eel; Fish Food Production; Mussel Culture; Scallop Culture; Other Shellfish; Provincial Government (Aquaculture Mandate); Federal Government (Aquaculture Mandate); The Role of Aquaculture Associations; Student, Faculty, Visiting Lecturer Presentations.

 

Duration - 13 weeks (1.5 hours per week)

 

AQUA 4111 (Aquaculture & the Environment)

 

This course is designed to provide an overview and understanding of current issues related to aquaculture and the environment.

 

Introduction to Sustainable Aquaculture Environmental Issues; Population and Fisheries Interactions; Physical Impacts of Aquaculture Facilities; Therapeutics and Fish Farming; Benthic and Water Column Impacts; Fish Meal Supply, Contaminants and Food Safety; Beneficial Impacts; Integrated Fish Farming; Environmental Management Practices; Responsible Aquaculture.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

AQUA 4112 (Practical Facility Maintenance & Animal Husbandry)

 

A practical course to introduce students to recirculating facility maintenance and management, and salmonid animal husbandry (from broodstock maintenance through fry rearing).

 

Marine Institute (MI) Aquaculture Facility; Activities and Maintenance; Essential Calculations; Animal Husbandry.

 

Duration - 52 hours

 

Laboratory - 4 hours/week for 13 weeks

 

AQUA 4113 (Aquaculture Engineering)

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of engineering principles as they apply to aquaculture technology.

 

Properties of Water; Water Supply; Mechanics of Fluids; Water Level and Flow Measurement; Pumps; System Construction Materials; Pond Systems; Effluent and Filtration; Recirculation Systems; Disinfection; Aeration; Degassing; Heating and Cooling; Cage Systems; Flume Tank; Observations of Model Cage.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours per week = 52 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours every second week = 12 total hours

 

AQUA 4114 (Ropework & Net Mending)

 

This course is designed to develop the participant’s ability to understand the design and construction of various types of rope, maintenance and inspection of ropes, and regulations governing rope usage. It will include rope safety, rope use and maintenance for small vessels, and moorings and anchoring. It will also enable them to perform basic aquaculture net mending tasks.

 

Ropes; Knots, Bends and Hitches; Ropework/Working with Ropes; Rope Safety; Net Mending and Patching.

 

Duration - 35 hours

 

AQUA 415A/415B

 

This course is designed to provide an overview of the criteria for selecting a suitable aquaculture site, including land-based and open-water sites for finfish and shellfish species. Students will also be introduced to the application of mapping and GIS in aquaculture site selection. This course is taught with special reference to finfish and shellfish farm developments and opportunities in Newfoundland, elsewhere in Canada and in other regions of the world.

 

Water Requirements; Technical Site Studies; Finfish and Shellfish Farm Planning: Mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

 

Prerequisite -
AQUA 415A - None;
AQUA 415B - AQUA 415A

 

Duration - AQUA 415A - 13 weeks
Lectures/Field Work - One 2-hour session per week = 26 total hours
GIS Laboratories - 1 hour per week = 13 total hours

Duration - AQUA 415A - 13 weeks
Lectures/Field Work - One 2-hour session per week = 26 total hours
GIS Laboratories - 1 hour per week = 13 total hours

 

AQUACULTURE WORK EXPERIENCE

 

This work experience is designed to provide the student with practical experience in salmonid or mussel farm operations. To meet the graduation requirements of the Technical Certificate in Aquaculture, the student must successfully complete the Aquaculture Work Experience.

 

Prerequisites - For those enrolled in the Technical Certificate in Aquaculture (Salmonid), successful completion of core courses:

 

  • Salmonid Biology and Husbandry (SRS 500524);
  • Salmonid Feeds and Feeding (500525); and
  • Salmonid Health and Biosecurity (500526).

 

For those enrolled in the Technical Certificate in Aquaculture (Mussel), successful completion of core courses:

 

  • Mussel Spat Collection and General Biology (500534);
  • Mussel Farm Stocking Capacity (500535); and
  • Mussel Harvesting, Handling and Processing (500536).

 

Schedule - Minimum of 175 hours (25 days)

 

BIOL 1100

 

An introductory level course designed to provide knowledge of plant and animal biology, and their relationships on foods.

 

The Chemical and Cellular Basis of Life; The Biology of Organisms; The Perpetuation of Life; Biology of Population and Communities; Diversity of Organisms.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week - 26 total hours

 

BIOL 2100 (Aquatic Ecology)

 

This is a second level course designed to cover in moderate detail various aspects of aquatic ecology with emphasis on marine ecology. A strong emphasis will be placed on the laboratory sessions which will introduce students to the kinds of data collected during ecological studies in aquatic environments.

 

Ecology and Ecosystems; Primary Production and Feeding Relationships; Population Ecology; Ecological Cycles; Aquaculture Ecology.

 

Prerequisite - BIOL 1100 (Biology); STAT 2108 (Applied Statistics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours per week = 26 total hours

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week = 39 total hours

 

BIOL 2102 (Microbiology)

 

This course is designed to prepare students for the Food Safety 2101 and Biology 2202 courses.

 

Introduction to Microbiology; History of Microbiology; Microscopy and Staining; Prokaryotic Microorganisms; Microbial Growth; Viruses; Fungi; Protozoa; Algae; Microbial Genetics; Classification of Prokaryotic Microorganisms; Control of Microbial Growth; Interaction of Microbes and Host; Aquatic Microbiology.

 

Prerequisite - BIOL 1100 (Biology)

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 39 hours

 

BIOL 2105 (Microbiology)

 

This is an introductory level course designed to provide students with an awareness and competency in basic microbiological techniques and applications.

 

Introduction to Microbiology; Microscopy and Staining; Prokaryotic Microorganisms; Eukaryotic Microorganisms; Viruses; Microbial Growth; Control of Microbial Growth; Drinking Water and Wastewater Treatment; Biogeochemical Cycles.

 

Prerequisite - BIOL 1100 (Biology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

BIOL 2201 (Microbiology)

 

This is an introductory level course designed to prepare the students for courses in marine environmental technology.

 

Introduction to Microbiology; Microscopy and Staining; Prokaryotic Microorganisms; Eukaryotic Microorganisms; Viruses; Microbial Growth; Control of Microbial Growth; Marine Environment and Microorganisms; Microbial Ecology of the Oceans; Marine Microbes and Human Society; Drinking Water and Wastewater Treatment.

 

Prerequisite - BIOL 1100 (Biology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week

 

BIOL 2202 (Food Microbiology)

 

This course will introduce students to the microorganisms and their activities in food production.

 

Introduction to Food Microbiology; Characteristics of Microorganisms Associated with Foods; Factors Influencing Microbial Growth in Foods; Food Spoilage; Food Preservation Methods; Food Borne Diseases; Microbiological Analysis of Foods; Shelf-life and Challenge Studies; Beneficial Uses of Microorganisms in Foods.

 

Prerequisite - BIOL 2102 (Microbiology) or BIOL 2105 (Microbiology)

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 39 hours

 

BIOL 2300 (Fish Identification & Remediation)

 

This is an intermediate level course that develops the student’s understanding of the types of fish that inhabit marine and freshwater habitats of North America. The focus of the course is identification of species, habitat and habitat protection and general fish health.

 

Fish Characteristics and Classification; Fish Identification; Fish Health; Fish Habitat Regulations.

 

Prerequisite - BIOL 1100 (Biology)

 

Duration - 5 weeks (56 hours)

 

Lecture - 14 total hours

 

Laboratory - 42 total hours

 

BIOL 3100 (Marine Biology)

 

This is an intermediate level course which develops the student’s understanding of the types of living organisms which inhabit the ocean, tidal, and near shore areas. The interaction of the different species is emphasized throughout the course.

 

Marine Organisms: Function and Environment; Organisms of the Sea Bed; Organism of the Open Sea; Seaweeds and Benthic Microorganisms; Taxonomic Classification and Adaptations.

 

Prerequisite - BIOL 1100 (Biology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

BIOL 4104 (Food Microbiology)

 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the microbiology of foods. The important parameters controlling microbial growth in foods, the microorganisms involved in spoilage of foods and principles of microbial spoilage and their control will be discussed. Students will also be introduced to the methods of microbiological analysis of foods.

 

Introduction; Characteristics of Microorganisms Associated with Foods; Sources of Microorganisms in Foods; Factors Influencing Microbial Growth in Foods; Food Spoilage; Food Preservation Methods; Microbial Analysis of Food and Food Environment; Beneficial uses of Microorganisms in Foods; Shelf-life and Challenge Studies.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 39 hours total

 

BIOL 4105 (Water & Wastewater Microbiological Analysis)

 

This course is designed to provide an overview of microorganisms related to water and wastewater and the techniques for monitoring the microbiological safety and quality of water.

Introduction to Microbiology; Microscopy and Staining; Prokaryotic Microorganisms; Microbial Growth; Viruses; Fungi; Protozoa; Algae; Helminthes; Control of Microbial Growth; Antimicrobial Agents; Bacterial Classification; Microbiological Examination of Water; Drinking Water Guidelines; Microbial Indicators of Pollution; Biofilms.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week = 39 total hours

 

BIOL 4200 (Water & Wastewater Microbiology)

 

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the microbiology of water and wastewater treatment processes.

 

Water and Wastewater Treatment; Activated Sludge Process; Bulking and Foaming in Activated Sludge Plants; Biofilms and Attached Microbial Growth; Waste Stabilization Ponds; Sludge Microbiology; Anaerobic Digestion of Wastewater and Sludge; Biological Aerosols and Bioodors from Wastewater Treatment Plants; Public Health Aspects of Wastewater and Biosolids Disposal; Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations; Water and Wastewater Disinfection; Microbiological Aspects of Drinking Water Distribution; Drinking Water Guidelines; Methods of Isolation and Identification of Microorganisms; Waterborne Pathogens and Parasites; Biotechnology and Pollution Control.

 

Prerequisite - BIOL 4105 (Water and Wastewater Microbiological Analysis)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours per week = 26 total hours

 

BSMG 0001 (Managing Your Fishing Enterprise)

 

This course introduces the participants to the fundamentals of managing a fishing enterprise.

 

The Value of the Newfoundland and Labrador Fishing Industry; The Participants in the Fishing Industry; The Future of the Fishery; Introduction to Business Management; Analyzing Your Fishing Business; Increasing Profits; Developing Your Business Plan; Record Keeping; Taxes.

 

Duration - 10 days

 

BSMG 0002 (Introduction to Fishing Enterprise Management)

 

This course introduces the participants to the fundamentals of managing a fishing enterprise.

 

Introduction to Business Management; Forms of Business; Analyzing Your Fishing Business; Increasing Profits; Developing Your Business Plan; Record Keeping; Taxes.

 

Duration - 5 days (35 hours)

 

BSMG 0202 (Workplace Preparation)

 

This course will provide work term and workplace preparation through an overview of employer expectations, an awareness of individual differences and rights, and an appreciation for maritime careers.

 

Seafaring; Teamwork; Life at Sea; Personal Management; Interpersonal Communication; Codes, Practices and Regulations; Labour Unions; Substance Abuse; Career Preparation, Professionalism and Ethics; Cultural Diversity and Sensitivity.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 0101 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

Duration – 13 weeks

 

Lectures – 2 hours/week

 

BSMG 0300 (Business Skills)

 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the field of entrepreneurship, including the characteristics of the entrepreneur, the advantages and disadvantages of self-employment, and some of the steps involved in starting a business. It will also focus on the role of providing quality customer service. Students will be able to use the skills and knowledge gained in this course to effectively provide a consistently high level of service to the customer.

 

Self-Employment; Business Ownership; The Entrepreneur; Identifying Business Opportunities; The Entrepreneurial Process; Business and Government Interaction; Service Quality; Customer Wants and Needs; Effective Customer Communication.

 

Prerequisite - Successful completion of all courses in Terms 1 and Term 2

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 7 hours/week = 35 hours total

 

BSMG 1102 (Management Principles)

 

This course is designed to give participants an understanding of the current business management principles and practices applicable to Canadian industry in general and the food production field in particular. This course will teach participants to develop organizational and planning skills and assist them to function as a team player in food manufacturing operation.

 

Business and Economic Systems; The Canadian Business System; Forms of Business Ownership; Management Practices; Improving Productivity; Practicing Interpersonal Skills; Leadership Skills; Problem-Solving; Making Decisions; Contemporary Management Issues.

 

Duration - 39 hours total

 

BSMG 2104 (Policy & Law)

 

This is an introductory course that looks at various aspects of marine environmental law at the regional, national and international level. It gives the students an overview of various location, the regulatory bodies that deals with them and the interaction between these various bodies.

 

The Policy Making Process and the Development of Laws and Regulations; International Environmental Initiatives; International Environmental Conventions; National Environmental Acts, Laws and Regulations; Provincial Laws, Acts and Regulations; Municipal Regulations; Environmental Legal Issues.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

BSMG 2110 (Law & Environment)

 

This is the first of two advanced level courses designed to bring together the major elements of marine law and the marine environment such that the student might understand the importance of both in their lives as professional seafarers and the intimate connection between the two.

 

The Law and its Purposes; Marine Insurance; Salvage.

 

Prerequisites - WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase I - Nautical Science)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

BSMG 2209 (Product Development)

 

This course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct the development of a new product. It focuses on the steps required to develop, process and package a food product.

 

Introduction to Marketing Concepts; Product Planning; Product Development for the Food Industry; Phases in Product Development; Food Science and Technology; Packaging in the Food Industry.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours

 

BSMG 3101 (Engineering Economics)

 

This course covers the basic principles of engineering economy with application to engineering economic decision making. The various methods for economic analysis of alternatives are investigated as well as depreciation methods and income tax consequences.

 

Basic Concepts of Engineering Economy; Economic Decision Making; Analysis of Multiple Alternatives; Depreciation and Income Tax Calculations.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

BSMG 3105 (Shipyard Management)

 

This is an advanced level course designed to introduce students in the Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Systems Design programs to the framework and structure of Canadian shipbuilding.

 

Introduction to the Shipyard; Framework of the Company; The Basic Work Pattern; Tendering; Design Check and Cost Estimating; Government Agencies and Ships; Specification Writing; Ship Contracts; Liability; Shipyard Planning Department; Quality Control; Union Contracts Sub Contractor Agreement.

 

Prerequisite - ENSY 3301 (Ship Engineering Project) or NARC 3102 (Ship Design)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours per week = 30 hours total

 

BSMG 3109 (Marine Law/Ethics & Environmental Stewardship)

 

This course involves complex environmental issues, marine law and professional ethics as related to the responsibilities of the Marine Engineer employed in Canada’s Merchant Marine Industry.

 

Human Relations; Contemporary Issues; Marine Environment; Marine Environmental Science; Marine Environmental Issues; Pollutants; Preventative Remedies; Response Remedies; Industrial Safety; Ship Management; Canada Shipping Act; Regulations.

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 8 hours/week = 40 hours total

 

BSMG 3111 (Environmental Assessment & Auditing)

 

This is an advanced level course which deals with the assessment and auditing processes as they pertain to the environmental sector.

 

Environmental Assessment; Project Analysis; Environmental Auditing; and Environmental Auditing Projects.

 

Prerequisite - BSMG 2104 (Policy & Law)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

BSMG 3113 (Personnel Resource Management)

 

This course will provide students with business and organization management knowledge as it pertains to the marine sector.

 

Seafaring; Marine Terminology; Human Resources; Marine Engineering Diploma Program Requirements; Personnel Resource Management; Employee Relations; National and International Regulations; International Safety Management Code (ISM); Maritime English.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

BSMG 3114 (Business of Shipping)

 

This is an advanced level course designed to build on previous knowledge regarding ships and the business of shipping obtained in earlier introductory courses. It is meant to give the student an in-depth knowledge of the organization of shipping, shipping operations, and the cargo market. Its focus is the business of shipping.

 

The course is designed to help the ship’s officer understand the evolution of the shipping industry; the production of shipping services; the types and organization of shipping operations; the cargo market and its organization and port operations.

 

An Overview of International Trade and Transport ; The Freight Market; Supply, Demand, and Shipping Market Cycles; Shipping Costs and Revenue; and The International Environment of Trade and Transport.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 3102 (Cargo Operations); WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II - Nautical Science)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

BSMG 3115 (Law & Environment)

 

This is the second advanced level course designed to bring together the major elements of marine law and the marine environment such that the student might understand the importance of both in their lives as professional seafarers and the intimate connection between the two.

 

The Carriage of Goods by Sea; The Environment and the Law; The Ship’s Master and the Law.

 

Prerequisite - BSMG 2110 (Law & Environment)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

BSMG 3116 (Ship Management)

 

This is an advanced level course in shipboard management practices designed for future practicing ship’s officers and will lead to an understanding of management practices at sea. It builds on previous knowledge derived from other courses and exposure to actual practice at sea. It is meant to give the student insight into global shipboard management practices and the role they will play as shipboard managers.

 

Management Issues in Marine Transportation; Basic Principles of Management; The International Safety Management Code (ISM); The International Labour Organization (ILO); The International Transport Federation (ITF); Ship Management and the Master; and Code of Professional Conduct; The International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1995 (STCW ’95) with 2010 Amendments.

 

Prerequisites - WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase I - Nautical Science);

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

BSMG 3117 (Food Law)

 

An introductory course designed to provide an overview of the provincial and federal food agencies and regulations that exists in Canada.

 

Introduction to Food Law; Canadian Legal System; Canadian Food Inspection Agency; Health Canada; Food and Drugs Act; Food Labelling Regulations; Food Recalls; Provincial Legislation; International Food Organizations.

 

Lecture - 39 hours

 

BSMG 3118 (Technical Problem Solving)

 

This course is designed to provide participants with the methods and techniques to analyze and solve technical problems that arise in the food industry. It will foster a creative and critical thinking approach in solving day-to-day problems that occur in management, employee, materials, and processing aspects of the food industry.

 

Creative Thinking; Critical Thinking; Problem Solving.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

BSMG 3119 (Management Principles)

 

This course is designed to give participants an understanding of the current business management principles and practices applicable to Canadian industry in general. This course will teach participants to develop organizational decision-making and planning skills and assist them to function as a team player in the modern workplace.

 

Business and Economic Systems; The Canadian Business System; Small Business and Entrepreneurship; The Business Functions; Improving Productivity; Practicing Interpersonal Skills; Leadership Skills; Problem-Solving; Making Decisions and Taking Action; Contemporary Management Issues.

 

Duration - 39 hours total

 

BSMG 3120 (Product Development)

 

This course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct the development of an new product and focuses on the steps needed to develop, process and package a food product.

 

Introduction to Marketing Concepts; Product Planning; The Conceptual Process of Product Development; Product Mix; Product Development for the Food Industry; Phases in Product Development; Food Science and Technology; Packaging in the Food Industry.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours

 

BSMG 3121 (Environmental Economics)

 

This course covers introductory economic theory with application to the utilization and valuation of natural resources and environmental projects.

 

Introduction to Economics; Basic Economic Methods and Tools; Economic Systems and Their Roles in Society; The Organization of Business in Canada; Market Forces and Price Determination; Market Forces and Elasticity; Consumer Behaviour; Economic Indicators; Environmental Economics; The Economy and the Environment; Analytical Tools in Benefits and Costs; Environmental Analysis; Benefit-Cost Analysis.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

BSMG 3122 (Law & Environment)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with knowledge about and opportunities for practical use of various IMO and Transport Canada conventions and regulations related to the law of the sea and protection of the marine environment.

 

Introduction to Maritime Law; Law of the Sea; IMO Conventions on Safety of Life at Sea and Protection of the Marine Environment; Anti-Pollution Procedures and All Associated Equipment; Pollution-prevention Requirements.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours per week = 52 hours total

 

BSMG 3200 (Introduction to Business)

 

This course is designed to give participants an understanding of current business practices.

 

Business in a Changing World; Starting and Growing a Business; Managing for Quality and Competitiveness; Creating the Human Resource Advantage; Marketing: Developing Relationships; Financing the Enterprise.

 

Duration - 3 hours/ week = 39 hours total

 

BSMG 3204 (Ship Management)

 

This is an advanced course in shipboard management practices. It builds on previous knowledge and addresses such advanced topics as Port State Control and Management Practices in the multi-ethnic environment commonly found aboard ships at sea. The course is designed to give students an advanced understanding of ship control and inspection under port state principles, ship management in today’s personnel environment, crisis management and managing in other adverse situations.

 

Port State Control; Managing in the Multi-Ethnic Environment; Managing Under Adverse Conditions and the Provision of Care; Women at Sea; Marine Occupational Health and Safety in Canada; Accident/Incident Investigation Practices at Sea.

 

Prerequisites - BSMG 3116 (Ship Management); WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II - Nautical Science)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

BSMG 3205 (Ship Management)

 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to generic management principles and techniques used to manage shipboard personnel. The course also provides the student with knowledge and practical opportunities to use various Transport Canada regulations related to shipboard management.

 

Basic Principles of Management; Shipboard Personnel Management; Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (CSA 2001); Canada Labour Code (CLC); Canadian Regulations and Vessel Documentation.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 1204 (Seamanship II); WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

BSMG 3206 (Feasibility & Economics in Ship Design)

 

This course addresses engineering economics, and its application in design concepts, quality and the complex relationship and framework of design within the shipyard and ship production.

 

Shipyard Business Structure; Work Flow and Ship Production; Basic Concepts of Engineering Economy; Economic Decision Making Theory; Analysis of Multiple Alternatives; Tendering, Cost Estimating and Bid Packages; Maritime Law and Ship Management; Surveying and Dry-docking; Effective Resource Management

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus)

 

Duration - 4 hours per week for 13 weeks (52 hrs.)

 

BSMG 3300 (General Ship Knowledge Refresher)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with knowledge and opportunities for practical use of various IMO and Transport Canada conventions and regulations.

 

Pollution-Prevention Requirements; International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1995 (STCW ‘95); Canada Shipping Act, 2001(CSA 2001); Canadian Regulations and Vessel Documentation; Knowledge of Personnel Management; Canada Labour Code.

 

Prerequisite - BSMG 3104 (Ship Management); BSMG 3116 (Ship Management)

 

Duration - 20 hours over 7 weeks

 

Lectures -15 hours over 7 weeks

 

Laboratories - 5 hours over 7 weeks

 

BSMG 3301 (Leadership & Teamwork)

 

This course provides the student with knowledge, skill and understanding of leadership and teamwork at the operational level on board a ship. The course is designed to meet STCW requirements for the application of leadership and team working skills, in accordance with the 2010 Manila Amendments of STCW, specifically as stated in tables A-II/1, A-III/1, and A-III/6 (operational level) of the Annex A of the STCW Code.

 

Working Knowledge of Shipboard Personnel Management; Task and Workload Management; Effective Resource Management; Decision-making Techniques; Managing Fatigue and Stress; Shipboard Training and Developing Human Potential.

 

Prerequisites - None

 

Duration - 24 hours

 

Lectures - 24 hours

 

BSMG 3400 (Leadership & Teamwork)

 

This course is intended to provide the student with the knowledge, skill and understanding of leadership and teamwork at the operational level on board a ship. The course is designed to meet STCW requirements for the application of leadership and team working skills, in accordance with the 2010 Manila Amendments of STCW, specifically as stated in tables A-Il/i, A-111/1 and A-111/6, Function: Controlling the operation of the ship and care for persons on board at the operational level.

 

Shipboard Personnel Management and Training; International Maritime Conventions, Recommendations and National Legislation; Task and Workload Management; Effective Resource Management; Decision Making Techniques; Application of engine Room Resource Management (ERM) Principles.

 

Prerequisites - None

 

Duration - 27 hours

 

Lectures - 21 hours

 

Simulation - 6 hours

 

BSMG 3401 (Marine Law & Environment Stewardship)

 

This course addresses complex international and national environmental issues, marine law and professional ethics as related to the responsibilities of the Marine Engineer employed in the global merchant marine service.

 

Maritime Legislation Originators; International Conventions and Legislation; Anti-pollution/Safety Procedures and Plans; Maritime Law; Canadian Marine Environmental Issues; Pollution Response Remedies; Ship Management; Canada Shipping Act; Canadian Marine Acts and Regulations.

 

Prerequisites - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours per week = 65 hours total

 

BSMG 3500 (Fundamentals of Canadian Food Laws & Regulations)

 

This course is designed to introduce the major topics in Canadian food laws and regulations that are fundamental in the manufacturing and trade of safe and compliant food commodities. While Canadian food laws and regulations are the primary focus of this course, some international food laws and regulations will also be introduced.

 

Introduction to Canadian Legal System; Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Federal Food Acts and Regulations; Additional Federal Departments and Agencies; Provincial Food Laws and Regulations; International Food Laws and Regulations; Genetically Engineered (GE) Food.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours

 

BSMG 4102 (Marketing Aquaculture Products)

 

This course is designed to teach participants the fundamentals of marketing. Emphasis is on the components of marketing as they relate to the fishing industry.

 

Marketing Concepts; The Marketing System and the Environment; Markets and Buyer Behaviour; Market Research Process; Target Markets and Market Segmentation; Product Planning; Product Strategy; New Product Development; Brands, Packaging and Labelling; Price Determination; Fish Farms and Distribution; Promotion.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

BSMG 4103 (Fundamentals of Food Law)

 

Knowledge of food legislation is essential in order to control the safety and quality of foods. This course is designed to address the issues and facts that are important for understanding the system of food regulations that exists in Canada.

 

Introduction to Food Law; Canadian Legal System; Canadian Food Inspection Agency; Health Canada; Food and Drugs Act; Food Labelling Regulations; Food Recalls; Provincial Legislation; International Food Organizations.

 

Duration - 39 hours total

 

BSMG 4104 (Business Management)

 

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the current management principles and practices applicable to industry. The course will include the development of a business plan.

Types of Business Organization; Business Description; Management Principles; Productivity and Quality Control; Starting a Business; Sources and Applications of Funding; Financial Reporting; Internal Control and Cash; Financial Statements; Comparative Analysis of Financial Statements; Financial Planning and Budgeting; Business Plan Development; Government Regulation, Taxation and Assistance.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

BSMG 4106 (Legal Aspects of Coastal Zone Management)

 

This course provides a general overview of the legal issues related to the administration of the marine environment. It will review the historical process involved in the making of the new Law of the Sea to regulate the use of the oceans and coastal zones. This course will also discuss some of the principles guiding national interest in their territorial waters and their relationship to the management of the coastal zones.

 

Historical Background of Ocean Management; National Expansion of the Marine Territory; The Search for International Agreements; The UN Conference on the Law of the Sea; National Legislation; New Fishing Laws and changes in Property Rights; Environment Protection Laws; The Legal Framework of Coastal Zone Management.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

BSMG 4107 (Conflict Resolution Skills)

 

This course provides participants with an understanding of the basic principles of conflict resolution and negotiation strategies. The skills taught will enable students to accept a role in the coordination of multidisciplinary groups; investigate and solve problems; and generate solutions to inter-sectoral conflicts relevant to the coastal zones.

 

Introduction to Conflict Resolution; Elements of Effective Leadership; Organizational Behavior; Decision Making and Problem Solving; The Nature of Negotiations; Canadian Labour Practices.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

BSMG 4109 (Coastal Economics)

 

This course introduces participants to the economic factors related to the management of Coastal Zones. It will look at the current problems facing these areas and policies in force to regulate and sustain development. Participants should have a general (non-specialist) understanding of the principles of economic science.

 

The course will make an effort to provide an updated view of the global issues of the Coastal Zone maturation and encourage a critical discussion on the present and future of coastal zone growth.

 

Introduction to Economics; The Nature of Economics; Economic Systems, Roles, Sectors and Functions; Market Forces and Business Concepts: Price, Utility, Production, and Costs; Natural Resource Economics; Analytical Tools and Environmental Analysis; The Development of Economics and Ecology; Problems and Principles of Ecological Economics; Policies, Institutions and Instruments; Coastal Management Decision-Making.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

BSMG 4110 (Environmental Policy-Water Quality)

 

This course is designed to give students an introduction to the issues surrounding global water management and future expectations for water and wastewater treatment. Environmental law, water guidelines for potable water and wastewater treatment nationally and internationally will be considered.

 

This course will explore these issues through case studies and seminars.

 

Resource Status; Resource Characteristics; Resource Regulation; International Efforts and Agreements; Case Studies.

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

BSMG 4111 (Fundamentals of Canadian Food Laws & Regulations)

 

This course is designed to examine the major topics in Canadian food laws and regulations that are fundamental in the manufacturing and trade of safe and compliant food commodities. While Canadian food laws and regulations are the primary focus of this course, pertinent international food laws and regulations will also be introduced.

 

Introduction to Canadian Legal System; Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Federal Food Acts and Regulations; Other Federal Agencies; Provincial Food Laws and Regulations; US Food Laws and Regulations; International Food Laws and Regulations; Genetically Engineered (GE) Food.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

BSMG 4112 (Management Principles)

 

This course is designed to give participants an understanding of the current management principles and practices applicable to the industry. This course will concentrate on teaching participants how to develop organizational and planning skills and how to function as a team player.

 

Introduction to Management and its Evolution; Planning and Strategic Management; Decision Making; Organizational Structure; Leadership Skills; Motivating Employees; Working in Groups and Teams; Foundations of Control; Problem Solving; Adapting to Change; Practicing Interpersonal Skills.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

CHEM 1100 (Chemistry)

 

This is an introductory course designed to give students a knowledge and understanding of the fundamental chemical concepts which will form the basis for further studies in science and technology.

 

Introduction to Chemistry and Nature of Matter; Atomic Structure; Periodic Table; Chemical Bonding and Nomenclature; Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions; Intermolecular Forces, Crystal Structure and Alloys.

 

On Site Sections:

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

Distance Sections:

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - Synchronous/Asynchronous discussion forum available throughout duration of course. Other appropriate instructional methods as required

 

Laboratories - 13 - 2 hour sessions

 

CHEM 1101 (General Chemistry I)

 

This is an introductory chemistry course designed to enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of the fundamental chemical concepts which will form the basis for further studies in science and technology.

 

Atoms and Elements; Molecules, Compounds, and Chemical Equations; Chemical Quantities and Aqueous Reactions; Periodic Properties of the Elements; Chemical Bonding I: Lewis Theory; Chemical Bonding II: Molecular Shapes.

 

Prerequisite - High school chemistry recommended, but not essential.

 

Duration (DU) - 13 weeks

 

Lectures (LC) - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories (LC) - 3 hours once per week = 39 hours total

 

CHEM 1200 (Chemistry)

 

This course will develop further the fundamental concepts of chemistry, with emphasis on those relevant to the processes of chemical reaction rates and equilibrium, and to electron and proton transfer reactions. These processes will provide the basis for applications in various technologies.

 

Solutions and Solubility; Rates of Reaction and Chemical Equilibrium; Acids and Bases; Oxidation and Reduction Reactions; Electrochemistry.

 

Prerequisite - CHEM 1100 (Chemistry) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

CHEM 1201 (Chemistry)

 

This course will develop further the fundamental concepts of chemistry, with emphasis on those relevant to the processes of chemical reaction rates and equilibrium, and electron and proton transfer reactions. These processes will provide the basis for applications in various technologies.

 

Liquids, Solids, and Intermolecular Forces; Solutions; Chemical Kinetics; Chemical Equilibrium; Acids and Bases; Aqueous Ionic Equilibrium; Electrochemistry.

 

Prerequisite - CHEM 1101 (General Chemistry I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Problem Solving Tutorial - 1 hour/week = 13 hours total Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

CHEM 2101 (Environmental Chemistry)

 

This course is designed to provide students with the basic skills required to perform chemical analysis on environmental samples. The course will build upon knowledge obtained in basic chemistry with applications to the environmental industry.

 

Basic Environmental Chemistry; Chemistry of Surface and Subsurface Waters; Characteristics of Seawater; Heavy Metals, Metalloids, and Radionuclides in the Environment; Sampling and Chain of Custody.

 

Prerequisite - CHEM 1200 (Chemistry)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

CHEM 2102 (Biological Chemistry)

 

This is an intermediate level course designed to provide the student with the basics of organic chemistry and how it relates to biologically important substances such as lipids, carbohydrates, and amino acids and proteins.

 

Introduction to Organic Chemistry; Bonding and Isomerism; Alkanes and Cycloalkanes: Conformational and Geometric Isomerism; Alkenes and Alkynes; Aromatic Compounds; Stereoisomers; Alcohols, Phenols, and Thiols; Ethers; Aldehydes and Ketones; Carboxylic Acids and their Derivatives; Amines and Related Nitrogen Compounds; Carbohydrates; Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins.

 

Prerequisite - CHEM 1200 (Chemistry)

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 39 hours

 

CHEM 2103 (Organic Chemistry)

 

This is an intermediate level chemistry course designed to provide the student with the basics of organic chemistry.

 

Introduction to Organic Chemistry; Bonding and Isomerism; Alkanes and Cycloalkanes: Conformational and Geometric Isomerism; Alkenes and Alkynes; Aromatic Compounds; Stereoisomerism; Alcohols, Phenols, and Thiols; Ethers; Aldehydes and Ketones; Carboxylic Acids and Their Derivatives; Amines and Related Nitrogen Structures.

 

Prerequisite - CHEM 1201 (General Chemistry II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week = 39 hours total

 

CHEM 2201 (Environmental Chemistry I)

 

This course is designed to provide students with the basic skills required to perform chemical analysis on environmental samples. The course will build upon knowledge obtained in general chemistry with applications to the environmental industry.

 

Basic Environmental Chemistry; Chemistry of Surface and Subsurface Waters; Characteristics of Seawater; Water and Wastewater Treatment; Organic Toxins and Contaminants.

 

Prerequisite - CHEM 1201 (General Chemistry II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

CHEM 2201 (Environmental Chemistry)

 

This course is designed to provide students an understanding of the present day concerns in environmental chemistry. It will build upon knowledge obtained in CHEM 2101 (Environmental Chemistry (Term 3).

 

Water and Wastewater Treatment; Organic Chemistry; Organic Toxins and Contaminants; Toxicology and Epidemiology; Biotic and Abiotic Chemical Transformations.

 

Prerequisites - CHEM 2101 (Environmental Chemistry)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

CHEM 2300 (Environmental Chemistry II)

 

This is an advanced level course designed to provide knowledge in the methods and instrumental equipment used to analyze environmental samples.

 

Electroanalytical Techniques; Spectroscopic Methods; Separation Methods.

 

Prerequisites - STAT 2108 (Applied Statistics) or equivalent; CHEM 2201 (Environmental Chemistry) or CHEM 2202 (Environmental Chemistry I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

CHEM 3100 (Food Chemistry)

 

This is an advanced level course designed to provide the student with an understanding of the various aspects of food chemistry.

 

Introduction to Food Chemistry; Water; Carbohydrates; Lipids; Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins; Vitamins and Minerals; Food Additives; Toxic Substances; Pigments and Colourants; Characteristics of Edible Muscle Tissues.

 

Prerequisites - FDTE 2105 (Nutrition); CHEM 2102 (Biological Chemistry) or CHEM 3102 (Biochemistry)

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 39 hours

 

CHEM 3101 (Food Analysis)

 

This is an advanced level course designed to provide the student with a detailed understanding of food analysis and how it relates to food chemistry and food technology.

 

Introduction to Food Analysis; Spectroscopy; Chromatography; Electrophoresis.

 

Prerequisites - PHYS 1200 (Physics); CHEM 2102 (Biological Chemistry) or CHEM 3102 (Biochemistry)

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 39 hours

 

CHEM 3102 (Biochemistry)

 

This is an intermediate level theory course designed to familiarize the food technology student with the major aspects of biochemistry.

 

Introduction to Biochemistry; Enzyme Kinetics; Energy Changes and Electron Transfer in Metabolism; Carbohydrate Metabolism; The Citric Acid Cycle; Electron Transport and Oxidative Phosphorylation; Lipid Metabolism; Nitrogen Metabolism.

 

Prerequisites - BIOL 1100 (Biology); CHEM 2103 (Organic Chemistry)

 

Duration - 39 hours

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

CHEM 3200 (Physical Chemistry)

 

This theory-based course builds upon topics covered in CHEM 1101 (General Chemistry I) and CHEM 1201 (General Chemistry II). Emphasis is on physical concepts and their applications to chemical and biological systems.

 

States of Matter and Properties of Gases; Thermodynamics: The First Law; Thermodynamics: The Second Law; Phase Equilibria; Properties of Mixtures; Chemical Equilibria.

 

Prerequisites - CHEM 1100 (Chemistry) or CHEM 1101 (General Chemistry I), CHEM 1200 (Chemistry) or CHEM 1201 (General Chemistry II), MATH 1101 (Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Problem Solving Tutorial - 1 hour/week = 13 hours total

 

CHEM 4100 (Water Chemistry)

 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the chemical composition of natural waters and the analytical methods by which these constituents are to be determined.

 

Criteria and Standards for Drinking Water Quality; Sampling, Quality Assurance/Quality Control; Concentration of Solutions; Characteristics of Natural Waters; Organic Compounds in Raw and Finished Waters; Disinfection Chemistry.

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 39 hours

 

CHEM 4102 (Food Chemistry)

 

This is an advanced level course designed to build on knowledge so as to enhance a student’s understanding of food chemistry while introducing a student to chemical concepts related to food safety.

 

Introduction to Food Chemistry; Reporting Results and Reliability of Analysis; Instrumentation; Naturally Occurring Food Components; Chemical Additives.

 

Lectures - 39 hours total

 

Laboratory - 39 hours total

 

CHEM 4200 (Chemical & Analytical Methods)

 

This is an advanced level course designed to provide the student with a detailed understanding of the instruments and techniques involved in water analysis.

 

Introduction to Analytical Chemistry; Quality Assurance in Analytical Chemistry; Electroanalytical Techniques; Separation Methods; Quantitative Optical Spectroscopic Methods; Mass Spectroscopy.

 

Prerequisite - CHEM 4100 (Water Chemistry)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week = 39 total hours

 

CMSK 0102 (Communication Skills)

 

This course is designed to provide students with the various skills needed to communicate more effectively in the workplace.

 

Learning Strategies; Learning Strategies; Writing Skills I; Technical Reading and Writing; Technical Presentations; Employment Skills I.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

CMSK 0103 (Communication Skills)

 

This course is designed to provide vocational students with the various skills needed to communicate more effectively in the workplace.

 

Learning Strategies; Technical Writing; Oral Reporting; Informal Report Writing; The Job Search; Technical Correspondence.

 

Duration - 10 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week for 10 weeks = 40 hours

 

CMSK 0202 (Communication Skills)

 

This course is designed to provide students with the various skills needed to communicate more effectively in the workplace.

 

Employment Skills II; Writing Skills II; Informal Reports; Technical Descriptions; Technical Presentations.

 

Prerequisite - CMSK 0102 (Communication Skills)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

CMSK 0203 (Communication Skills)

 

This course is designed to provide students with the various skills needed to communicate effectively in the workplace. Specifically, it focuses on interpersonal communication, technical writing, business correspondence, informal reports, and technical presentations.

 

Interpersonal Communication; Technical Writing; Business Correspondence; Informal Reports; Technical Presentations.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3/0

 

CMSK 0300 (Employment Skills)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the critical elements of effective job search techniques.

 

The Labour Market, Job Search Documents, Other Employment-related Correspondence, The Job Interview.

 

Prerequisite - Successful completion of all term two courses

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 3/0

 

CMSK 1100 (Introduction to Technical Reporting)

 

This course is designed to teach technology students the fundamentals of technical communication in both oral and written forms. Emphasis is on strategies of technical writing and presenting.

 

Communication Process; Technical Writing Fundamentals; Technical Abstracts; Technical Descriptions; Technical Presentations.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

CMSK 1102 (Technical Communication I)

 

This course is to provide technology students with an opportunity to develop effective written and oral technical communication skills. Emphasis is on fundamentals of technical writing. Preparing for job searches and writing employment-related documents are also introduced.

 

Communication Process; Technical Writing Fundamentals; Technical Definitions, Descriptions and Processes; Technical Processes; Job Search.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

CMSK 1103 (Introduction to Technical Communications & Computer Applications)

 

This course is designed to teach technology students the fundamentals of technical communication and computer applications. Emphasis is on strategies of technical researching, writing, and presenting.

 

Introduction; Writing Skills; Software Applications; Technical Writing; Technical Abstracts; Technical Descriptions; Technical Presentations.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

CMSK 1104 (Introduction to Technical Reporting)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide technology students with the opportunity to develop effective technical reporting skills in both oral and written forms. Emphasis is on the characteristics of technical writing and reading, research gathering and analysis, and the strategies for technical reporting and presenting.

 

Technical Writing and Reading Fundamentals; Research Strategies: Information Gathering, Analysis, and Documentation; Informal Report Writing; Semi-Formal/Formal Technical Report Writing; Oral Technical Reporting.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours per week = 52 total hours

 

CMSK 1105 (Technical Communications II)

This course provides technology students with an opportunity to develop effective written and oral technical communication skills. Emphasis is on the fundamentals of technical writing. Preparing for job searches and writing employment-related documents are also introduced.

 

Communication Process; Technical Writing Fundamentals; Technical Definitions, Descriptions, and Processes; Technical Presentations; Job Search.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

CMSK 1200 (Technical Reporting)

 

This course is designed to help technology students apply criteria for structuring informal and formal reports. Various report formats will be examined with emphasis on research, organization, and documentation. Oral reporting techniques will be enhanced through exploring formal technical report and persuasive presentations.

 

Technical Reporting Strategies; Informal Report Writing; Formal Report Writing; Technical Presentations; Technical Correspondence.

 

Prerequisite - CMSK 1100 (Introduction to Technical Communication)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week x 13 weeks = 39 hours total

 

CMSK 1201 (Technical Communications II)

 

This course is designed to hone technical writing skills, introduce fundamental research skills, develop informal and formal report writing skills, and enhance presentation techniques via a formal report presentation.

 

Technical Reporting Strategies; Informal Report Writing; Research Fundamentals; Semi-formal/Formal Report Writing; Formal Report Presentations.

 

Prerequisites - CMSK 1102 (Technical Communications I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

OR

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 10 hours/week

 

CMSK 1202 (Technical Reporting Using Computer Applications)

 

This course is designed to help technology students apply criteria for structuring informal and formal reports. Various report formats will be examined with emphasis on research, organization, and documentation. Oral reporting techniques will be enhanced through formal technical report and persuasive presentations.

 

The Strategy of Technical Reporting; Informal Report Writing; Formal Report Writing; Technical Presentations; Technical Military Correspondence; Word Processing Application.

 

Prerequisite - CMSK 1103 (Introduction to Technical Communications and Computer Applications) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

CMSK 1205 (Technical Communications II)

 

This course is designed to hone technical writing skills, introduce fundamental research skills, develop informal and formal report writing skills, and enhance presentation techniques via a formal report presentation.

 

Technical Reporting Strategies; Informal Report Writing; Research Fundamentals; Semiformal/Formal Report Writing; Formal Report Presentations.

 

Prerequisite - CMSK 1102 (Technical Communications I) or CMSK 1105 (Technical Communications I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours

 

CMSK 2101 (Technical Communications III)

 

This course is designed to help students work well in groups, develop basic strategies for resolving conflict, and interact professionally with the media and the public.

 

Groups and Meetings; Conflict Resolution; Media Relations; Ethical Issues/Codes of Ethics

 

Prerequisite - CMSK 1102 (Technical Communications I); CMSK 1201(Technical Communications II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

CMSK 2102 (Interpersonal Communications)

 

The food industry operates in a people intensive environment. This course will prepare students to develop and enhance various interpersonal communications skills, positive attitude and self-confidence thorough effective listening, non-verbal perception skills, and information handling. Emphasis will also be given to assertiveness training, conflict resolution and handling difficult behaviour with employees and the public. Presentation skills, team building and group dynamics will form important components of this course. Emphasis in this course will be on practical application, case studies, simulation and role-playing.

 

Communications as Listening Skills; Information Gathering Methods and Information Management; Assertiveness Training; Oral Presentation Skills; Conflict Resolution and Handling Difficult Behaviour; Developing and Managing Teams; Customer Service.

 

Prerequisite - CMSK 1201 (Communication at Work)

 

Duration - 8 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week

 

CMSK 2201 (Technical Communications IV)

 

This course is designed to help students structure and evaluate arguments, develop and organize a position paper for an effective debate, and organize and write a proposal.

 

Argument; Research Documents; Debate Position Paper; Debate; Proposal Writing.

 

Prerequisite - CMSK 2101 (Technical Communications III)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures: 2 hours/week = 26 hours

 

Seminar: 2 hours/week = 26 hours

 

CMSK 4102 (Communication Skills)

 

This course is designed to provide students with effective communications skills and practices to apply in their future workplaces and communities, and with direct application to other advanced diploma program modules. Emphasis will be on presentation skills, meeting management, report and proposal writing, and proficiency in the basic concepts and applications of computer and internet technology as communications tools.

 

Communications Process in Industry and Business; Report and Proposal Writing; Effective Oral Presentation; Group Discussions and Meeting Management Techniques; Business Letters, Office Memos, Electronic Inter-office Networks; Information Technology Applications; Employment Acquisition Strategies.

 

Prerequisite - Restricted to student in graduate programs

 

Duration - 39 hours total

 

CNTL 2102 (Instrumentation, Controls & Automation)

 

This is an introduction to process instrumentation and control systems, designed to provide the students with the basics of measurement and final control elements.

 

Introduction to Process Control; Pressure Measurement; Signal Transmission; Level Measurement; Flow Measurement; Temperature Measurement; Final Control Elements.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

OR

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 7 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week

 

CNTL 2105 (Electro-Mechanical Logic)

 

This course introduces the student to electro-mechanical/electronic devices used in control systems and to the general concepts and programming techniques associated with programmable logic controllers. Specific training will be provided in the Marine Institute PLC lab.

 

Electromechanical/Electronic Devices; PLC System Description; Introduction to Digital Systems; Operation of a Programmable Logic Controller; Programming a PLC; The Ladder Diagram; Timers; Counters; Arithmetic Functions; Analog Operations.

 

Prerequisites - CNTL 2102 (Instrumentation, Controls & Automation); ELTR 1101 (Electronics for Instrumentation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week x 13 weeks = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week x 11 weeks = 22 hours total

 

CNTL 2108 (Control Devices & Basic Control Theory)

 

This course is designed as an introduction to thyristors and basic control theory. It will provide the student with the basic design and operation of Silicon Controlled Rectifiers, common breakover devices, other common thyristors, and the basics of process control.

 

Silicon Controlled Rectifier; Breakover Devices; Other Thyristors; Transducers and Sensors; Process Control Theory.

 

Co-requisite - ELTR 1102

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

CNTL 2110 (Instrumentation, Controls & Automation)

 

This is an introduction to process instrumentation and control systems, designed to provide the students with the basics of measurement and final control elements.

 

Introduction to Process Control; Pressure Measurement; Signal Transmission; Level Measurement; Flow Measurement; Temperature Measurement; Final Control Elements.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 7 hours/week = 35 hours total

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week = 28 hours total

 

CNTL 2111 (AC Motor Controls)

 

This is an advanced level course designed to introduce the student to relay control systems, AC motor controllers and variable speed AC motor drives. Upon successful completion, the student should be able to design and analyze typical relay control systems. Also the student should be able to analyze typical motor controllers and variable speed drives used with three-phase alternating current motors.

 

Relay Control Systems; AC Full Voltage Starters; AC Reduced Voltage Starters; Multi-Speed Controllers; Wound Rotor Motor Controllers; Synchronous Motor Controllers; Alternating Current Drives.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 1303 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

CNTL 2202 (Instrumentation, Controls & Automation)

 

This is an introduction to process control systems, designed to provide the students with the basics of PID Control as well as and overview or more advanced systems.

 

PID Control; Advanced Control Techniques; Digital Control Systems; Steam Plant Control; Steam Turbine Control; Diesel Plant Control; H.V.A.C. Control; Chiller/Boiler/Distribution System Control.

 

Prerequisite - CNTL 2102 (Instrumentation, Controls & Automation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

CNTL 2203 (Controls)

 

This course is intended to show the application of classical control theory to industrial control systems, including Bode Analysis. Control system components will be studies in theory and in the laboratory.

 

Modes of Control; Measurement Devices; Operational Amplifier Circuits; Bode Analysis.

 

Prerequisite - CNTL 2108 (Control Devices & Basic Control Theory) or CNTL 2109 (Control Devices)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

CNTL 2204 (Controls)

This is an introduction to process instrumentation and controls systems, designed to provide the students with the basics of measurement, final control elements and advanced control systems.

 

Review of Process Control; Pressure Measurement; Signal Transmission; Level Measurement; Flow Measurement; Final Control Elements; Advanced Control Techniques.

 

Prerequisite - CNTL 2108 (Control Devices & Basic Control Theory) or CNTL 2109 (Control Devices)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

CNTL 2205 (Instrumentation, Controls & Automation)

 

This is an introduction to process control systems, designed to provide the students with the basics of PID Control as well as and overview or more advanced systems.

 

PID Control; Advanced Control Techniques; Digital Control Systems; Steam Plant Control; Steam Turbine Control; Diesel Plant Control; H.V.A.C. Control; Chiller/Boiler/Distribution System Control.

 

Prerequisites - CNTL 2110 (Instrumentation, Control and Automation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week every second week = 24 hours total

 

CNTL 2206 (Instrumentation, Controls & Automation)

This is an introduction to process instrumentation and control systems, designed to provide the students with the concept of process measurement and control.

 

Introduction to Process Control; Pressure Measurement; Signal Transmission; Level Measurement; Flow Measurement; Temperature Measurement.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

CNTL 2207 (Programmable Logic Controllers – PLCs)

 

This course introduces the student to the general concepts of industrial control solutions and programming techniques associated with programmable logic controllers. The student will have the opportunity to apply their abilities and develop troubleshooting skills through practical laboratory sessions on a particular PLC. Currently, specific training can be provided on SIEMENS Simatic S7-300 programmable logic controllers, along with the Step 7 Simatic software.

 

Introduction to Programmable Controllers (PCs) or Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs); System Description; The Memory Map; Operation of a Programmable Logic Controller; The Ladder Diagram; Programming a PLC; Timers; Counters; Arithmetic Functions.

 

Prerequisites - ELTR 2102 (Digital Logic); CNTL 2111 (AC Motor Controls)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

CNTL 2302 (Instrumentation, Controls & Automation)

 

This is an introduction to process instrumentation and controls systems, designed to provide the students with the basics of measurement and final control elements and process control.

 

Introduction to Process Control; Pressure Measurement; Signal Transmission; Level Measurement; Flow Measurement; Temperature Measurement; Final Control Elements; PID Control; Advanced Control Techniques; Digital Control Systems.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week = 36 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 x 2 hours/week = 24 hours total

 

CNTL 3105 (Instrumentation, Controls & Automation)

 

This is an introduction to process control systems, designed to provide the students with the basics of PID Control as well as and overview on more advanced systems.

 

PID Control; Advanced Control Techniques; Digital Control Systems; Final Control Elements; Analysis Instrumentation.

 

Prerequisites - CNTL 2206 (Instrumentation, Controls and Automation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week x 10 labs = 40 hours total

 

CNTL 3201 (Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers - PLCs)

 

This course extends the student’s understanding of concepts of industrial control solutions and programming techniques associated with programmable logic controllers, including various hardware and software upgrades. The student will have the opportunity to apply their abilities and develop troubleshooting skills through practical laboratory sessions with a typical programmable logic controller, human machine interface terminal, and variable frequency drive.

 

Program Control; Bit Manipulation; Sequencers; Analog Operations; PID Control; Human Machine Interface (HMI); AND Frequency Drives.

 

Prerequisite - CNTL 2207 (Programmable Logic Controllers – PLCs)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week for 10 weeks = 30 hours total

 

CNTL 3205 (Marine Process Measurements & Controls)

 

This course provides an introduction to shipboard instrumentation and control systems. It is designed to provide the student with the fundamentals of process measurement and control theory, sensors and measuring instruments, final control devices, and PID controllers.

 

Introduction to Process Control; Instrument Specifications and Diagrams; Signal Transmission and Indication; Pressure Measurement; Level Measurement; Flow Measurement; Temperature Measurement; Final Control Elements; Introduction to PID Controllers.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 1202

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - One 3-hour lab per week for 11 weeks = 33 hours

 

CNTL 3400 (Advanced Controls)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an exposure to advanced control topics and advanced process control systems, with particular attention paid to control topics found in the marine, and oil and gas sectors.

 

Smart Transmitters; Annunciators, Alarms, and Displays; Batch Control; Distillation Controls; Other Advanced Controls.

 

Prerequisites - CNTL 3105 (Instrumentation, Controls and Automation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 hours total

 

CNTL 3401 (Marine Automatic Control Systems)

 

This course introduces automatic control systems and provides students with the basics of PID Control as well as an overview of more advanced process and electro-mechanical control systems used in the marine industry.

 

PID Control; Advanced Process Control Strategies; Marine Processes and Systems; Hierarchical (Computer) Control Systems; Programmable Logic Control (PLC); Electromechanical Control Systems.

 

Prerequisite - CNTL 3205 (Marine Process Measurements and Controls); ELTR 3123 (Electronic Devices and Digital Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

CPSK 0100 (Introduction to Computers)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to computer systems. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of word processing, spreadsheets, e-mail and the internet and security issues.

 

Computer Fundamentals; Word-processing Software Applications; Spreadsheet Software Applications; Electronic Research.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures/Laboratories - 2 hours/week + 26 hours total (0/2)

 

CPSK 1100 (Computer Applications)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the use of computers as communication and learning tools.

 

Computer Fundamentals; Work-processing Software Applications; Electronic Research and Communication; Presentation Software Applications; Spreadsheet Software Applications.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures/Laboratories - 5 hours/week

 

CPSK 1101 (Computer Operations)

 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the various personal computer operating systems including MS DOS 6.22, Red Hat Linux, and Windows 2000.

 

Introduction to Operating Systems; Introduction to Linux; Introduction to Windows 2000.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures/Lab - 0/4 hours/week

 

CPSK 1102 (Introduction to Applied Programming)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the concepts of problem solving using computer programming techniques. The course will be taught using a high level language such as C++ or C#.

 

Computer Fundamentals; Program Design; C++/C# Fundamentals; Expressions and Interactivity; Decision Statements; Looping Statements; Functions; Arrays; Advanced File Operations; Pointers.

 

Duration - 13 Weeks

 

Laboratories - 2 hours twice per week = 52 total hours

 

CPSK 1103 (Computer Database & Spreadsheet Applications)

 

This course will advance the concept of the computer as a personal productivity tool. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of spreadsheet data and graphs, understanding of database functions and the integration of software packages with reference to relevant studies.

 

Computer Fundamentals; Presentation and Word-processing Software Applications; Intermediate and Advanced Spreadsheet Software Applications; Database Software Applications; Software Integration.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks (65 hours total)

 

Lectures - 1 hour/week

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week (two 2-hour labs/week)

 

CPSK 1300 (Computer Skills)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the use of computers as communication and learning tools.

 

Computer Fundamentals; Word-processing Software Applications; Presentation Software Applications; Spreadsheet Software Applications.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 0 hours/week = 0 hours total

 

Laboratories - 8 hours/week = 40 hours total

 

CPSK 2102 (Intermediate Computer Applications)

 

This course will advance the concept of the computer as a personal productivity tool. Emphasis will be on the creation of web pages, analysis of spreadsheet data and graphs, understanding of database functions and the integration of software packages with reference to relevant studies.

 

Web Page Design; Advanced Spreadsheet Software Applications; Database Software Applications; Software Integration.

 

Prerequisite - CPSK 1100 (Computer Applications)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week

 

ELTK 0102 (Electrotechnology)

 

This is an introductory course in electrical practice covering the concepts of electricity, circuit analysis, switchboards, wiring and cabling, and navigation lights.

 

Safety Precautions; The Electric Circuit; Ohm’s Law and The Power Law; Cells and Batteries; Electrical Measuring Instruments; Conductor Types and Sizes; Switchboards; Wiring Cabling and Distribution; Navigation Lights.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week (1 Lab every two weeks)

 

ELTK 0200 (Electrotechnology)

 

This course further deals with safety in the marine environment, the development of skills required in the use of test equipment, marine electrical maintenance, troubleshooting procedures, paralleling a.c. and d.c. generators, and the maintenance of a.c. and d.c. motors.

 

Safe Workshop Techniques; Magnets and Magnetism; DC Generators; AC Generators; AC Motors; DC Motors; Maintenance Procedures; and Troubleshooting.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 0102 (Electrotechnology) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week (1 Lab every two weeks)

 

ELTK 1100 (Electrotechnology)

 

This is an introductory course in electrical theory covering the basic concepts of electricity, circuit analysis and magnetism. The laboratory work is designed to develop skills in the construction of electrical circuits, use of electrical measuring instruments and reinforce theoretical concepts.

 

Introduction to Electricity; Ohm’s Law and Electric Circuits; Network Theory; Magnetism and Electromagnetism; Electrical Measurement; Inductance; Cells and Batteries.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTK 1101 (Electrotechnology)

 

This is an introductory course in electrical theory covering the basic concepts of electricity, resistive circuit analysis, network analysis and magnetism. The laboratory work is designed to develop skills in the construction of electrical circuits, use of electrical measuring instruments and reinforce theoretical concepts.

 

Introduction to Electricity; Ohm’s Law and Electric Units; Network Theory; Magnetism and Electromagnetism; Cells and Batteries.

 

Prerequisite - Introduction to Math 1000 or appropriate level of mathematics skills demonstrated on a mathematics placement test

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hour

 

ELTK 1102 (Electrotechnology)

 

This is an introductory course in electrical theory covering the basic concepts of electricity, circuit analysis and magnetism. The laboratory work is designed to develop skills in the construction of electrical circuits, use of electrical measuring instruments and reinforce theoretical concepts.

 

Introduction to Electricity; Ohm’s Law and Electric Circuits; Network Theory; Magnetism and Electromagnetism; Electrical Measurement; Inductance; Cells and Batteries.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTK 1103 (Introduction to Electrotechnology Applications)

 

This course is designed to deliver electrical theory covering the basic concepts, and applications of DC and AC electricity, magnetism and circuit analysis when applied to resistance, capacitance and inductance. An introduction to poly-phase AC circuits is also included. The laboratory work is designed to develop skills in the construction of electrical circuits, use of electrical measuring instruments and reinforce theoretical concepts.

 

Introduction to Electricity; Ohm’s Law and Electric Circuits; Magnetism and Electromagnetism; Electrical Measurement; Inductance; Cells and Batteries; Basic A.C. Theory; Inductance and Capacitance in A.C. Circuits; Introduction to Polyphase A.C.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

This course covers the basics of A.C. theory and its application to solve circuits containing resistance, capacitance and inductance. An introduction to transformers and polyphase A.C. circuits is also included.

 

Basic A.C. Theory; Inductance in A.C. Circuits; Capacitance and its Effect in A.C. Circuits; Resonance; Introduction to Transformers; Introduction to Polyphase A.C.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1100 (Electrotechnology) or ELTK 1102 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ELTK 1201 (Electrotechnology)

 

This course is a continuation of the electrotechnology course taken in the first semester. It covers the basics of A.C. Theory and the application of this to solve circuits containing resistance, capacitance and inductance. An introduction to transformers and polyphase A.C. Circuits is also included.

 

Basic A.C. Theory; Inductance; Capacitance; Parallel and Series Parallel A.C. Circuits; Resonance; Introduction to Transformers; Introduction to Polyphase A.C.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1101 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ELTK 1202 (Electrotechnology)

 

This course covers the basics of A.C. theory and its application to solve circuits containing resistance, capacitance and inductance. An introduction to transformers and polyphase A.C. circuits is also included.

 

Basic A.C. Theory; Inductance in A.C. Circuits; Capacitance and its Effect in A.C. Circuits.; Resonance; Introduction to Transformers; Introduction to Polyphase A.C.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1102 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTK 1203 (Basic Electrical Technology)

 

This is an introductory course in electrical theory covering the basic concepts of electricity, circuit analysis, magnetism, resistance, capacitance, inductance, motors, generators, transformers, and protective devices. The laboratory work is designed to develop skills in the construction of basic electrical circuits and the use of electrical measuring instruments. It will also reinforce theoretical concepts.

 

Electrical Principles; Electric Circuits; Electrical Safety; Magnetism; Inductance; Cells and Batteries; A.C. Theory; Inductance in A.C. Circuits; Capacitance in A.C. Circuits; and Distribution and Protection Devices.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTK 1301 (Electrotechnology)

 

This is a basic electrotechnology course designed to give the Marine Engineering student practical electrical experience.

 

Marine Safety; Marine Cabling and Glanding; Fuses and Breakers; Single and Three Phase Wiring; Multi-Meters and Meggas; Batteries; Electrical Panels; Gauges and Sensors; Starting Motors and Alternators; A.C. and D.C. Motors and Generators; Internal Communications.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1100 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 6 hours/week (2 labs - 3 hours each)

 

ELTK 1303 (Electrical Machines & Power Systems)

 

This is an intermediate level course in electrical machine theory and marine power systems. It covers basic DC and AC machine theory and introduces the student to the safe operation of electric systems and machines. As well, the structure and protection of marine power systems is covered.

 

DC Machines; AC Machines; Marine Electrical Power Systems.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1103 (Introduction to Electrotechnology Applications) OR ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

Lectures - 8 hours/week = 40 hours total

Labs - 4 hours/week = 20 hours total

 

OR

 

Duration - 13 weeks

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week for 10 weeks (starting in week 2) = 20 total hours

 

ELTK 2102 (Marine Electric Systems)

 

This is an intermediate course in ships electrical systems.

 

Ships Electrical Systems (General); Small Ship System; Large Ship System; Electrical Propulsion; Automation.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week

 

ELTK 2103 (Electrotechnology)

 

This is an intermediate level course designed to introduce students to the safe operation of electric systems and machines.

 

DC Machines; AC Machines; Marine Electrical Power Systems.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ELTK 2104 (Electrotechnology)

 

This is an introductory course in ship electrical systems.

 

Ship Electrical System; Small Ship System; Large Ship System.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 7 hours/week

 

ELTK 2106 (Electrotechnology)

 

This is an introductory course in electrical machine theory. It covers the basics of DC machines and transformers and provides students with a background in electrical machines. It will give students an appreciation of rotating machinery and an idea of the type and operating characteristics of various DC machines. The course will expand students’ knowledge of transformers and their applications, as well as enhance their ability to analyze electric circuits. The laboratory work is included to reinforce theoretical concepts and to enhance skills in the use of measuring instruments.

 

DC Machine Construction; DC Generators; DC Motors; Single-phase Transformers; Special Transformers.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ELTK 2107 (Electrotechnology)

 

This course is an introductory course in electrical machine theory. It covers the basics of A.C. and D.C. machine theory and provides the necessary background for subsequent courses in electrical machines. It also provides the students with an understanding of various types of controls devices for A.C. and D.C. machines.

 

D.C. Machines; A.C. Machines; Synchromechanisms and Servomechanisms; Final Correcting Devices and Amplifiers; Input Transducers - Measuring Devices; Typical Industrial Systems.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1201 (Electrotechnology) or ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ELTK 2108 (Electrotechnology)

 

This course is an introductory course in electrical machine theory. It covers the basics of A.C. and D.C. machine theory and provides the necessary background for subsequent courses in electrical machines. It also provides the students with an understanding of various types of switches used with A.C. and D.C. machines.

 

D.C. Machines; A.C. Machines; Mechanical and Electro-mechanical Switches.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1201 (Electrotechnology) or ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ELTK 2111 (Marine Electrical Equipment)

 

This is a basic electrotechnology course designed to give the Marine Engineering student practical electrical experience.

 

Marine Safety; Meters and Meggers; Electrical Panels; Control Devices; Protection Equipment; Marine Cabling and Glanding; Single and Three-phase Wiring; Distribution Schemes; Earth/Ground Fault Detection Systems; Batteries; Motors and Generators; Internal Communications.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1100 (Electrotechnology) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratory - 3 hours/week

 

ELTK 2118 (High Voltage Safety)

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with regulations and safety practices related to the operation, maintenance and repair of Remote Operated Vehicles (ROVs). Applicable laws and standards relevant to medium and high voltage safety, as well as, the associated protective equipment required will be addressed. Proper work procedures to be followed when carrying out maintenance and repair of ROVs will be discussed.

 

Legislation; Internal Controls; Personal Protective Equipment (PPE); Documentation; Marine Electrical Systems; Risk Management; Preparing the Work Site; Work Team Preparedness and Orientation; Materials and Equipment; Emergency Response Planning; Commissioning.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 1103 (Introduction to Electrotechnology Applications) or ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 20 hours total (10 Labs)

 

ELTK 2119 (Marine Electrical Systems)

 

This course gives students knowledge and skills in basic shipboard rotating electrical equipment, auxiliary power distribution systems, electrical fault protection and safe electrical usage.

 

Electrical Safety; Meters and Meggers; Fuses and Molded Case Circuit Breakers; Single and Three Phase Wiring; Introduction to Generators and Motors; DC Generators and DC Motors; AC Generators (Alternators) and AC Motors; Control Devices; Distribution Systems.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 1202(Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTK 2200 (Marine Electrical Troubleshooting)

 

This is an electrotechnology course designed to give the ROV student practical experience in electrical troubleshooting. The course requires students to apply structured problem-solving strategies to identify and resolve problems with ROV electrical.

 

Meters and Meggers plus Instrumentation; Electrical Panels; Controls Devices; Protection Equipment; Marine Cabling and Glanding; Singe and Three-phase Wiring; Motors and Generators (ROV, AC in particular); Structured Problem Solving; Power Supplies; Tracing Analog Signals.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 1303 (Electrical Machines and Power Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week = 39 total hours

 

ELTK 2303 (Electro-Maintenance)

 

This is a hands-on Electrotechnology course design to provide the student with the ability to develop practical skills in shipboard electrical maintenance in DC/AC equipment and electrical systems.

 

Battery Systems and Electrolysis; Electric Motors and Alternators; Marine Electrical Equipment, Wires, Cables and Glands; Function Tests; Starters and Controllers; Electrical Panels.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 2119 (Marine Electrical Systems)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 0 hours/week = 0 hours

 

Laboratory - 8 hours/week = 40 hours total

 

ELTK 3101 (Electrotechnology)

 

This is an advanced level course which covers topics in AC machines. The course is designed to provide the student with the necessary background information concerning the types characteristics, and applications of AC machines.

 

Three-phase Transformers; Three-Phase Induction Motors; Three-phase Synchronous Motors; Motor Branch Circuit and Enclosures; Alternators; Single-phase Induction Motors.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 2106 (Electrotechnology) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ELTK 3104 (Electrotechnology)

 

This course is intended to upgrade non electrical students to enable them to complete subsequent electronic courses in the ROV program.

 

Review of Basic Electrical Concepts; Ohm’s Law and Electric Circuits; Semiconductor Diodes Bipolar Junction Transistors; Silicon Controlled Rectifier; Other Thyristors; Operational Amplifier Circuits.

 

Duration - 3 weeks

 

Lectures - 9 hours/week = 27 hours total

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week (6 Labs) = 12 hours total

 

ELTK 3105 (High Voltage Safety)

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with regulations and safety practices related to the operation, maintenance and repair of Remote Operated Vehicles (ROVs). Applicable laws and standards relevant to medium and high voltage safety, as well as, the associated protective equipment required will be addressed. Proper work procedures to be followed when carrying out maintenance and repair of ROVs will be discussed.

 

Legislation; Internal Controls; Documentation; Personal Protective Equipment (PPE); Materials and Equipment; Marine Electrical Systems; Preparing the Work Site and Work Space; Work Team Preparedness and Orientation; Emergency Response Planning; Risk Management; Commissioning.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 1200(Electrotechnology) or equivalent

 

Duration - 10 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 40 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 30 hours total

 

ELTK 3106 (Marine Electrical Troubleshooting)

 

This is an electrotechnology course designed to give the ROV student practical experience in electrical troubleshooting. The course requires students to apply structured problem-solving strategies to identify and resolve problems with ROV electrical.

 

Meters and Meggers plus Instrumentation; Electrical Panels; Controls Devices; Protection Equipment; Marine Cabling and Glanding; Singe and Three-phase Wiring; Motors and Generators (ROV, AC in particular); Structured Problem Solving; Power Supplies; Tracing Analog Signals.

 

Prerequisite - ELTR 3118 (Industrial Electronics and Controls)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week

 

ELTK 3202 (DC Machines & Transformers)

 

This course in electrical machine theory covers the basics of DC machines and transformers, provides the necessary background in electrical machines, gives an appreciation of rotating machinery, and describes the type and operating characteristics of various DC machines. It also addresses transformers and their applications, electric circuit analysis, and includes laboratory work to reinforce theoretical concepts and enhance student skills in the use of measuring instruments.

 

DC Machine Construction; DC Generators; DC Motors; Single-Phase Transformers; Three-Phase Transformers; Special Transformers.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology); ELTK 2111 (Marine Electrical Equipment)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTK 3203 (Rotating AC Machines)

 

This is an advanced level course designed to provide the student with the necessary background concerning the types, characteristics, and applications of AC machines common to the marine environment.

 

Three-Phase Induction Motors; Three-Phase Synchronous Motors; Motor Branch Circuits and Enclosures; Alternators; Single-Phase AC Motors.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 1202 (Electrotechnology); ELTK 2119 (Marine Electrical Equipment)

 

Duration - 13 weeks instruction

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTK 3204 (DC Machines aned Transformers)

 

This course in electrical machine theory covers the basics of DC machines and transformers, provides the necessary background in electrical machines, gives an appreciation of rotating machinery, and describes the type and operating characteristics of various DC machines. It also addresses transformers and their applications, electric circuit analysis, and includes laboratory work to reinforce theoretical concepts and enhance student skills in the use of measuring instruments.

 

DC Motors; DC Generators; Electric Propulsion; Single-Phase Transformers; Three-Phase Transformers; Special Transformers.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 1202 (Electrotechnology); ELTK 2119 (Marine Electrical Equipment)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTK 3300 (Marine Electrical Knowledge)

 

This electrotechnology course is designed to give the Ocean Technology student a basic understanding of marine electrical systems.

 

Metering; Electrical Maintenance; Electrical Panels; Protection Equipment; Backup Power Supplies; Auxiliary Electrical Systems; Internal Communications.

 

Prerequisite - CNTL 2111 (AC Motor Controls)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 7 hours/week

 

ELTK 3301 (Marine Electrical Safety & Standards)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an exposure and basic understanding of electrical safety and standards practices for the installation and maintenance of electrical equipment in the marine industry.

 

Introduction to Safety and Standards; Grounding and Bonding; Conductor Ampacity and Marine Cables; Power Distribution and Panels; Ship Electrical Equipment; Marine Electrical Safety.

 

Prerequisites - CNTL 2111 (AC Motor Controls)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 7 hours per week = 35 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours twice per week (labs and industrial visits) = 30 hours total

 

ELTK 3400 (Shipboard Voltage Distribution Systems)

 

This electrotechnology course is designed to give the student basic shipboard electrical knowledge of high and low voltage power distribution systems, electrical fault detection and protection.

 

Electrical Safety; High Voltage Test Equipment; Shipboard Power Distribution Systems; Electrical Fault Detection; Fault Protection Equipment; Electrical Survey Requirements.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 2303 (Electro-Maintenance)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 13 hours

 

ELTK 3500 (Marine Cabling Installations)

 

This course is intended to provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to select, install, and terminate cables for on deck and subsea installations in a marine environment. It will involve application considerations for construction and selection of marine cables and connections, on deck electrical Installations and hazardous area considerations, and sonar, data collection and Remote Operated Vehicle considerations.

 

Marine Cable Construction; Submersed Data collection system and ROV cable considerations; Explosion protection for Electrical/Instrumentation installations (oil and gas); Connectors and Terminations (on deck); Connectors and Terminations (submersed); Splicing and Potting (submersed); Underwater Equipment Terminations (mechanical).

 

Prerequisite - ELTR 2113 (Fiber Optics)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 20 hours total

 

Laboratories - 4 hours twice a week = 40 hours total

 

ELTR 1101 (Electronics for Instrumentation)

 

This is an introductory electronics course intended to introduce students to the electronics circuitry used in instrumentation. This course provides the necessary prerequisite electronics for subsequent coursing in marine engineering process control and instrumentation.

 

Semiconductor Devices; Integrated Circuits; Transistor Switching Circuits, and Microprocessors/Computers/PLCs as Control Devices.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1100 (Electrotechnology); ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ELTR 1102 (Basic Electronic Devices)

 

This course will include the description, operation and application of simple electronic components with particular emphasis on semiconductor theory. Analysis techniques involving diode equivalent circuits will be introduced and expanded to bipolar transistor D.C. Biasing.

Semiconductors; Diode Applications; Bipolar Junction Transistors.

 

Prerequisite - for Electro-Mechanical and Electronics Engineering Technician Students: ELTK 1101 (Electrotechnology) for Bachelor of Technology (Ocean Instrumentation) students: ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week x 11 weeks = 22 hours total

 

ELTR 1103 (Electronic Fabrication Techniques)

 

This a practical electrical/electronic course which enables the student to obtain practical knowledge in soldering, wire wrapping, cable formation and test lead fabrication; it also equips the student to insert and extract electronic components from printed circuit boards and make repairs to damaged traces on a PCB. In addition, the student gains knowledge in electrical and hazardous material safety, proper use and care of hand tools, proper use and care of equipment, and hazards and prevention of ESD.

 

General Workshop Safety Procedures; Basic Handtools Used in Electronic Repair and Fabrication; Soldering and Desoldering Techniques; Circuit Wiring Techniques; Cable Formation and Connectors; Schematic Diagrams and Component Identification; Care and Use of Basic Test Equipment.

 

Prerequisite - for Bachelor of Technology (Ocean Instrumentation) students: ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Co-requisite - for Electro-mechanical Technician and Electronics Engineering Technician students: ELTK 1101 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 52 hours

 

Lectures - 13 hours

 

Laboratories - 39 hours

 

ELTR 1104 (Electronic Fabrication Techniques)

 

This a practical electrical/electronic course which enables the student to obtain practical knowledge in soldering, wire wrapping, cable formation and test lead fabrication; it also equips the student to insert and extract electronic components from printed circuit boards and make repairs to damaged traces on a PCB. In addition, the student gains knowledge in electrical and hazardous material safety, proper use and care of hand tools, hazards and prevention of ESD and surface mounting components.

 

General Workshop Safety Procedures; Basic Handtools Used in Electronic Repair and Fabrication; Soldering and Desoldering Techniques; Circuit Wiring Techniques; Cable Formation and Connectors; Schematic Diagrams and Component Identification; Surface Mount Components.

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour per week = 6 total hours

 

Laboratories - 3 hours twice per week = 36 total hours

 

ELTR 1301 (Control Electronics for ROV)

 

The course will include the description, operation and application of simple electronic components with particular emphasis on semiconductor theory. Analysis techniques involving diode equivalent circuits will be introduced and expanded to bipolar junction transistors,field-effect transistors and power control devices.

 

Semiconductor Diodes; Bipolar Junction Transistors; Field-Effect Transistors; Thyristors.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1100 (Electrotechnology)

 

Co-Requisite - ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week x 11 weeks = 22 hours total

 

ELTR 2102 (Digital Logic)

 

This course introduces students to the field of digital electronics. They will be taught design and diagnosis techniques applicable to digital electronics.

 

Introduction to Digital Circuits; Combinatorial Logic; Logic Families; Programmable Logic Arrays; Sequential Logic.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 lab @ 2 hours/week

 

ELTR 2107 (Electronic Troubleshooting)

 

This course requires students to apply structured problem-solving strategies to typical electronics equipment repairs.

 

Structured Problem Solving; Technical Documentation; Power Supplies; Tracing Analog Signals; Audio Frequency Systems; Radio Frequency Systems.

 

Prerequisite - ELTR 1102 (Basic Electronic Devices); ELTR 1103 (Electronic Fabrication Techniques)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/ week (2 labs @ 2 hours per week)

 

ELTR 2110 (Analog Communications)

 

This is an intermediate level electronics course designed to provide students with an introduction to the area of analog communications.

 

Introduction to Analog Communications; Amplitude Modulation and AM Systems; Single-Sideband Techniques; Frequency and Phase Modulation; Matching Circuits; Noise.

 

Co-requisites - ELTR 1102 (Basic Electronic Devices); MATH 1103 (Introduction to Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 lab @ 3 hours/week

 

ELTR 2113 (Fiber Optics & Network Cabling)

 

This fiber optics communications course emphasizes the practical application of fiber to the design and construction of communication systems and networks. The approach will give the student a hands-on, practical understanding of cable handling, terminating, splicing, testing with optical sources, and power meters; as well, the student will learn about twisted pair and coaxial network cabling.

 

Introduction to Fiber Optics; Optical Fibers; Optical Fiber Connections and Accessories; Fiber Optic Systems and Components; Fiber Installation; Termination and Testing; Network Cables.

 

Prerequisites - ELTR 1103 (Electronic Fabrication Techniques) OR ELTR 1104 (Electronic Fabrication Techniques)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour/week (13 hours total)

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once/week (26 hours total)

 

OR

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week (10 hours total)

 

Laboratories - 3 hour lab twice/week (30 hours total)

 

ELTR 2114 (Electromagnetic Radiation)

 

This course is designed to give naval students basic knowledge of radiation hazards onboard the Department of National Defense vessels. This course covers solutions to common radiation hazards and standardized tests for radiation hazards on naval vessels.

 

Introduction to the Shipboard Electromagnetic Environment; EMI and EM Fields; Shipboard Antennas and Radar; Shipboard EMI Sources; Shields, Enclosures, and Apertures; Cables and Transmission Lines; Grounds and Bonds; Radiation Hazards; EME Inspections and Testing.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1101

 

Duration - 13 weeks instruction

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 13 hours total

 

ELTR 2115 (Data Communications)

 

This Data Communications course provides a comprehensive data communications background to ROV candidates. The course starts off with an introduction to analog communications providing a background in amplitude modulation and frequency modulation principles including single-sideband techniques. Then the student is introduced to transmission mediums, protocols and characteristics. This is followed by digital communications systems, data transfer and emphasizes the practical application of fibre in the design and construction of communication systems and networks required for ROV operations. The approach will give the student the required communications background and a hands-on, practical understanding of cable handling, terminating, splicing, testing with optical sources, and power meters.

 

Introduction to Analog Communications; Amplitude Modulation and AM Systems; Single-Sideband Techniques; Frequency and Phase Modulation; Transmission Mediums and Protocols; Transmission Characteristics; Digital Communications Systems; Data Transfer; Fibre Optics.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1103 (Introduction to Electrotechnology Applications) or (ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hour per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

ELTR 2116 (Industrial Electronics & Controls)

 

This course is designed to enable students to design and work with power supplies, electrical motors and their electronic controllers in ROV applications.

 

Switched Mode Power Supplies (SMPS); Operational Amplifiers and Applications; Power Electronics; Electronic Controllers for Electrical Drives in ROV.

 

Prerequisites - ELTR 1301 (Control Electronics for ROV); ELTK 1303 (Electrical Machines and Power Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

ELTR 2117 (Microcomputer Interfacing I)

 

This course provides the student with knowledge of the software and hardware associated with a microprocessor system and its basic interfacing requirements.

 

Microprocessor Systems; C++ Language Basics; 8086/88 Microprocessor and Supporting Chips; Memory Systems; Input/Output and Communications; Shielding, Grounding and Transmission Line Techniques; Interfacing Basics and Special Applications (Laboratory Objective).

 

Prerequisite - ELTR 2102 (Digital Logic)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/ week

 

ELTR 2118 (Introduction to Computers & Networking)

 

This course is an introduction to computer systems and networking.

 

Computer Systems; Network Environment; Network Routing; Network Management; Network Security.

 

Prerequisite - CPSK 1102 (Introduction to Programming)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

ELTR 2202 (Analog Transistor Circuits)

 

This course involves the application of linear circuit theory to transistor circuits. The student will be introduced to linear models of discrete transistors and will learn how to use them to build up Generalized Amplifier modes of complete amplifier systems.

 

Transistor DC Biasing; Small Signal Models; Small Signal Analysis; Multistage Amplifiers; Power Amplifiers; Frequency Response.

 

Prerequisites - ELTR 1102 (Basic Electronic Devices) or ELTR 1301 (Introduction to Electronic Devices); ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology) or ELTK 1103 (Intorduction to Electrotechnology Applications)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours per week = 52 total hours

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week = 39 total hours

 

ELTR 2213 (Control Devices & Operational Amplifiers)

 

This course is designed as an introduction to thyristors and operational amplifiers. It will provide the student with the basic design and operation of Silicon Controlled Rectifiers, common breakover devices, other common thyristors, common operational amplifier circuits used in industrial controls, and the design of active filters.

 

Silicon Controlled Rectifier, Breakover Devices, Other Thyristors,Operational Amplifier Circuits, Active Filters.

 

Prerequisites - ELTR 1102 (Basic Electronic Devices)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTR 2214 (Microcomputer Interfacing)

 

This course provides the student with knowledge of the software and hardware associated with a microprocessor system and its basic interfacing requirements.

 

Microprocessor Systems; Advanced C++; Intel Microprocessors and Supporting Chips; Memory Systems; Input/Output and Communications; Shielding, Grounding and Transmission Line Techniques; Interfacing Basics and Special Applications (Laboratory Objective).

 

Prerequisites - CPSK 1102 (Introduction to Applied Programming); ELTR 2102 (Digital Logic); ELTK 1303 (Electrical Machines and Power Systems); ELTR 1103 (Fabrication Techniques)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

ELTR 2215 (Microcontroller Interfacing)

 

This course provides the student with knowledge of the Software and hardware associated with a Microcontroller and its basic interfacing Techniques.

 

Microcontroller Basics; Microcontroller Architecture; Communication Interfaces and Buses; Software Development; Shielding, Grounding and Transmission Line Techniques; Hardware.

Prerequisites - CPSK 1102 (Introduction to Applied Programming); ELTR 2102 (Digital Logic); ELTK 1303 (Electrical Machines and Power Systems); and ELTR 1104 (Electronic Fabrication Techniques)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week = 39 hours total

 

ELTR 3100 (Analog Integrated Circuits)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the theory relating to differential and operational amplifiers, analog filters and signal generators. The theory covered in class will be applied and validated during the laboratory periods.

 

The Design of an Operational Amplifier; Operational Amplifier Characteristics; Linear Applications; Active Filters; Non-Linear Applications.

 

Prerequisite - ELTR 2202 (Analog Transistor Circuits)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 lab @ 3 hours/week

 

ELTR 3104 (Digital Signal Processing)

 

This course introduces the student to digital signal processing concepts.

 

Introduction to Digital Signal Processing; Signal Analysis; Digital Signal Processing; Digital Filters; Data Compression; Naval Applications of DSP.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1103 (Introduction to Calculus) or MATH 1101 (Introduction to Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week x 10 weeks

 

ELTR 3105 (Pulse & Switching Circuits)

 

This course will expose students to circuits used in pulse and switching applications. Analysis and design of the circuits will be emphasized along with the idea of utilizing such circuits as building blocks to larger scale digital circuits.

 

Pulse Fundamentals; RC Circuits; Switching Circuits; Active Filtering Circuits (Using Op-Amps); Applications.

 

Prerequisites - CNTL 2108 (Control Devices & Basic Control Theory) or CNTL 2109 (Control Devices); MATH 1103 (Introduction to Calculus)

 

Co-requisite - ELTR 2202 (Analog Transistor Circuits)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week * 13 weeks

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week * 10 weeks

 

ELTR 3108 (Microcomputer Interfacing)

 

This course provides the student with the knowledge of the hardware associated with a microprocessor system and the interfacing requirements for communication with the environment.

 

Microprocessor Systems; Memory Systems; Digital Input/Output; Analog Input/Output; Specific Applications; Microprocessor System Support Circuits; Buses; Testing and Troubleshooting.

 

Co-requisite - CPSK 1101 (C-Language Programming) for Electronics Engineering Technician and Electro-Mechanical Technician Students only; ELTR 2102 (Digital Logic)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week

 

ELTR 3109 (Introduction to Networks)

 

This introductory course in local, metropolitan and wide area networks covers the various levels of network protocol, from the lowest hardware levels to the highest application protocols.

 

Introduction to Networks; Physical Layer; Data Link Layer; Medium Access Control Layer; Network Layer; Transport Layer; Application Layer; Network Security.

 

Prerequisite - ELTR 3108 (Microcomputer Interfacing)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

ELTR 3114 (Radar & Sonar Systems)

 

This is an introductory course in radar and sonar system fundamentals.

 

Radar: The Radar System; Display System; The Radar Equation; Clutter and Multipath Effects; Processing Techniques; Sonar: Sonar Systems; The Sonar Equation; Underwater Transducers; Transmission Loss in an Ocean Environment; Noise and Reverberation; Sonar Prediction.

 

Prerequisite - ELTR 2110 (Analog Communications)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Labs/Tutorials - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTR 3115 (Electronic Communications - Radar)

 

An introductory course in radar system fundamentals.

 

The Radar System; Display Systems; The Radar Equation; Clutter and Multipath Effects; Processing Techniques.

 

Prerequisite - ELTR 2110 (Analog Communications)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

Labs/Tutorials - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTR 3116 (Advanced Networking)

 

This advanced networking course covers the various levels of network protocol, from the lowest hardware levels to the highest application protocols.

 

Introduction to Networks; Reference Models; Network Operating Systems; Wide Area Networks; Cisco Platforms; Voice Over IP; Network Management; Network Security.

 

Prerequisites - ELTR 3108 (Microcomputer Interfacing); CPSK 1101 (Computer Operations)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 6 hours/week

 

ELTR 3117 (Fabrication)

 

This is a practical electrical/electronic course which enables the student to obtain the practical knowledge in soldering, wire wrapping, cable formation and test lead fabrication. This course also enables the student to obtain the practical ability to insert and extract electronic components from printed circuit boards and well as make repairs to damaged traces on a PCB.

 

In addition, the student receives knowledge in electrical safety, proper use and care of hand tools, proper use and care of equipment, and hazards and prevention of ESD.

 

General Safety Procedures; Basic Hand Tools Used in Electronic Repair and Fabrication; Soldering and Desoldering Techniques; Circuit Wiring Techniques; Cable Formation and Connectors; Schematic Diagrams and Component Identification.

 

Duration - 3 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hour/week

 

Laboratories - 9 hours/week

 

ELTR 3118 (Industrial Electronics & Controls)

 

This course is designed to enable students to understand power supplies, electrical motors and their electronic controllers in ROV applications.

 

Switched Mode Power Supplies (SMPS); Electrical Machines; Power Electronics; Electronic Controllers for Electrical Drives in ROV.

 

Duration - 10 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 40 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week (6 Labs) = 18 hours total

 

ELTR 3119 (Data Communications)

 

This Data Communications course provides a comprehensive data communications background to ROV candidates. The course starts off with an introduction to analog communications providing a background in amplitude modulation and frequency modulation principles including single-sideband techniques. Then the student is introduced to transmission mediums, protocols and characteristics. This is followed by digital communications systems, data transfer and emphasizes the practical application of fibre in the design and construction of communication systems and networks required for ROV operations. The approach will give the student the required communications background and a hands-on, practical understanding of cable handling, terminating, splicing, testing with optical sources, and power meters.

 

Introduction to Analog Communications; Amplitude Modulation and AM Systems; Single-Sideband Techniques; Frequency and Phase Modulation; Transmission Mediums and Protocols;Transmission Characteristics; Digital Communications Systems; Data Transfer; Fibre Optics.

 

Prerequisite - for ROV students ELTR 1301 (Control Electronics for ROV); for ROV Advanced Technical Certificate students. ELTK 3104 (Electrotechnology) or equivalent

 

Duration - 10 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hour/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ELTR 3120 (Integrated Circuits)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an exposure, understanding of data sheets and working knowledge of various integrated circuits that are related to power controls and instrumentation.

 

Power Supply Circuits; Waveform Generators and Comparator Circuits; Packaging Information; Motor Controller integrated Chips; Instrumentation Circuits.

 

Prerequisites - BTech (OI) students - ELTR 2213 (Control Devices and Operational Amplifiers) and CNTL 2111 (AC Motor Controls); BTech(UV) students - ELTR 1301 (Introduction to Electronic Devices) and ELTK 1303 (Machines and Power Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week (6 Labs) = 12 hours total

 

ELTR 3121 (Introduction to MicrocomputerInterfacing)

 

This course provides the student with knowledge of the hardware associated with a microprocessor system and its basic interfacing requirements.

 

Microprocessor Systems; Memory Systems; Microprocessor System Support Circuits; Bus Structures, Digital Input/Output; Assembly Language Basics; C Language Basics; Interfacing Basics.

 

Prerequisites - ELTR 2102 (Digital Logic)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/ week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/ week = 39 hours total

 

ELTR 3122 (Embedded Microcontrollers)

 

This course provides the student with knowledge of the hardware and software associated with Embedded Microcontrollers.

 

Introduction to Embedded Microcontrollers; Microcontroller Functions; Program Design & Interfacing; Programming Environments; Serial Data Communications; Data Conversion; Digital Signal Processing; Microcontroller Platforms.

 

Prerequisites - ELTR 2215 (Microcomputer Interfacing) or ELTR 2214 (Microcomputer Interfacing)

 

Duration - 13 weeks 

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

ELTR 3123 (Electronic Devices & Digital Systems)

 

This electronic devices and digital systems course provides theory on several basic active devices deployed in analog and digital electricity. The course covers introductory level knowledge on digital electronics and microprocessor based system.

 

Semiconductors; Integrated Circuits; Waveforms and Switching Circuits; Introduction to Digital Logic Circuits (Digital); Microprocessor Systems.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 1202 (Electrotechnology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ELTR 3202 (Microcomputer Applications)

 

This course provides the student with a knowledge of the hardware and software associated with microcomputer systems and peripherals. The course provides opportunity for students to develop interest in microcomputer systems through project work.

 

Microprocessor Types; Displays; Keyboards; Microcomputer Busses; Printers; Plotters; Tape and Disk Storage; Operating Systems; High Level Languages.

 

Prerequisites - MATH 1103 (Introduction to Calculus); ELTR 3108 (Microcomputer Interfacing)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 lab @ 3 hours per week

 

ELTR 3208 (Computer Troubleshooting)

 

This course applies problem-solving techniques to typical computer equipment repair situations. Students will use divergent thinking methods to create solutions and convergent thinking to apply the solutions. The course provides opportunity for students to develop interest in microcomputer systems through project work. On completion of this course the successful student will have demonstrated that he/she has acquired a detailed knowledge of computer systems sufficient to perform planned and corrective maintenance on computer workstations.

 

Problem Solving Techniques; Basic Computer Service Concepts; PC Architecture; Microprocessor Types; PC Memory Architecture; Disk System Architecture; PC Bus Architectures; Computer Displays; Peripheral Devices; Networking Fundamentals; Troubleshooting Techniques.

 

Prerequisite - CPSK 1101 (Computer Operations)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week

 

ELTR 3209 (Introduction to Computers & Networking)

 

This course introduces students to the field of digital electronics, and computer systems and networks. It is designed to give students a basic understanding of the computer based control systems being used in modern marine applications.

 

Introduction to Digital Circuits; Combinational Logic; Computer Fundamentals; Networking Fundamentals; Troubleshooting Techniques; Computer and Other Microprocessor Based Applications on Board Vessels.

 

Prerequisite - CNTL 2110 (Instrumentation, Controls & Automation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ELTR 3210 (Advanced Microcomputer Interfacing)

 

This course provides the student with advance knowledge of the hardware associated with a microprocessor system and the interfacing requirements for communication with the environment.

Pentium Processors Features; Analog Input/Output; Embedded Systems; C++ Programming; Mixing Assembler and C++; Advanced Interfacing Design and Applications.

 

Prerequisites - ELTR 3121 (Introduction to Microcomputer Interfacing)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/ week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/ week = 39 hours total

 

ELTR 3211 (Control Devices & Systems)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the theory relating to Control devices and systems, including Bode analysis. The theory covered in class will be applied and validated during the laboratory periods.

 

Transducers and Sensors; Process Control Theory; Bode Analysis.

 

Prerequisites - ELTR 1301 (Introduction to Electronic Devices); ELTR 2116 (Industrial Electronics and Controls)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 1 lab @ 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

ELTR 3212 (Networking Basics)

 

This introductory course in local area networks, wide area networks, and industrial area networks covers the various levels of network protocols, from the lowest hardware levels to the highest application protocols.

 

Network Environment; Network Reference Models; Area Networks; Network Routing; Network Management; Networked Applications; Industrial Networks.

 

Prerequisite - CPSK 1102 (Introduction to Programming); ELTR 2102 (Digital Logic)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

ELTR 3400 (Electronic Communications)

 

This Data Communications course provides a comprehensive data communications background for Ocean Instrumentation Candidates. The course starts off with an introduction to analog communications providing a background in amplitude modulation and frequency modulation principles including single-sideband techniques. Then the student is introduced to transmission mediums, protocols and characteristics. This is followed by digital communications systems, data transfer and emphasizes the practical application of fibre in the design and construction of communication systems and networks required in the field of Ocean Instrumentation.

 

The approach will give the student the required communications background and a hands-on, practical understanding of cable handling, terminating, splicing, testing with optical sources, power meters, as well as hands on practice with Ocean Sensor Systems.

 

Introduction to Analog Communications; Amplitude Modulation and AM Systems; Single-Sideband Techniques; Frequency and Phase Modulation; Transmission Mediums and Protocols; Transmission Characteristics; Digital Communications Systems; Data Transfer; Sensors and Data Collection.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology); ELTR 1102 Electronic Devices); ELTR 2113 (Fibre Optics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

ENGR 0105 (Engineering Drawing)

 

This is a basic course in the fundamentals of engineering drawing.

 

Drafting Fundamentals; Applied Geometry; Orthographic Projection; Dimensioning; and Production Processes and Operations.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ENGR 0107 (Blueprint Reading & Interpretation)

 

This course is designed to develop the skills necessary for the student to interpret working drawings and prints common to industry and offshore fabrication.

 

Purpose and Make-up of Blueprints; Basic Lines and Views; Sketching; Notes and Specifications; Dimensions; Structural Shapes; Other Views; Sections; Detail and Assembly Prints; Abbreviations and Symbols; Welding Symbols, Blueprint Reading and Layout and Piping Drawings.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures/Laboratories - 5/0 hours/week

 

ENGR 0108 (Engineering Graphics)

 

This course is designed to develop the skills necessary for the student to interpret working drawings and prints common to industry.

 

Drafting Fundamentals, Notes and Specifications, Dimensions, Bill of Materials, Sections, Working Drawings, Abbreviations and Symbols, Production and Processes, Welding Symbols, Piping Drawings, Electrical Drawings, Fasteners.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ENGR 0200 (Engineering Drawing)

 

This is an introductory course in the preparation and interpretation of detail and assembly working drawings.

 

Pictorial Drawing and Sketching; Sectional Views; Fasteners; Working Drawings; Piping Drawings; Welding Drawings; and Electrical Drawings.

 

Prerequisite - ENGR 0105 (Engineering Drawing) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour/week = 13 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours

 

ENGR 0204 (Template Development)

 

This introductory level course is designed to familiarize the student with practical aspects of template development.

 

Template Development; Layout and Template Development Terminology; Establishing Line of Cut Using Templates; Shape Development; Layout Tools and Procedures; Template Development Using Triangular, Radial and Parallel Lines; Layout Operation for Structural Fabrications; Operations Required to Develop Wrap Around Templates for Pipe and Tubing.

 

Prerequisite - ENGR 0107 (Blueprint Reading and Interpretation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3/0

 

ENGR 1100 (Engineering Graphics)

 

Engineering Graphics provides visually oriented data that is usable by technical, engineering, and manufacturing personnel to assist in the production of goods and services. The method of creating Engineering Drawings has changed from manual drafting to Computer Aided Drafting; however, the technical content of Engineering Graphics has not changed.

 

Introduction to Technical Drawing; Introduction to CAD; Geometric Constructions; Orthographic Projection; Pictorial;Sketching; Dimensioning; Sectional Views.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures/Laboratories - 5 hours/week

 

ENGR 1101 (Engineering Drawing)

 

This is an introductory level course designed to provide students with the basics of mechanical drafting and freehand sketching. Included will be topics addressing drafting fundamentals, use of drafting equipment, and informative retrieval from mechanical blueprints. This course is NOT a drafting course nor a course directed to CAD.

 

Drafting Fundamentals; Applied Geometry; Orthographic Projection; Sectional Views; Dimensioning; Detail and Assembly Working Drawings.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures/Laboratories - 3 hours/week

 

ENGR 1102 (Engineering Drawing)

 

This course is designed to build on the basic drafting completed in ENGR 1103 (Engineering Graphics) with primary application to marine machinery assembly drawings. The student will apply basic machine shop and engineering knowledge to select materials and make working assembly drawings, using traditional methods, of selected marine machinery. Drawing diagram reading exercises are used to extract information as required in the work place.

 

Engineering Drawing Basics; Piping Drawings; Welding Drawings; Electrical Drawings; Assembly Drawings; Equipment Operation Manuals and Ship Drawings.

 

Prerequisite - ENGR 1105 (Engineering Graphics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours a week for a total of 26 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours a week for a total of 26 hours

 

Total - 52 hours

 

ENGR 1103 (Engineering Graphics)

 

Engineering Graphics provides visually oriented data that is usable by technical, engineering, and manufacturing personnel to assist in the production of goods and services.

 

Introduction to Technical Drawing; Geometric Constructions; Pictorial Sketching; Orthographic Projection; Scale; Blueprint Interpretation; Dimensioning; Sectional Views.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week = 26 hrs total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hrs total

 

ENGR 1104 (Engineering Graphics)

 

Engineering Graphics provides visually oriented data that is usable by technical, engineering, and manufacturing personnel to assist in the production of goods and services. The method of creating Engineering Drawings has changed from manual drafting to Computer Aided Drafting.

 

Introduction to CAD; Editing Existing Entities; Advanced Drawing Construction; Dimensioning Variables; Plotting.

 

Prerequisites - ENGR 1105 (Engineering Graphics)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures/Labs - 8 hours/week = 40 hours

 

ENGR 1105 (Engineering Graphics)

 

This Engineering Graphics course provides students with knowledge and skills pertaining to visually oriented data that is usable by technical, engineering, and manufacturing personnel to assist in the production of goods and services.

 

Introduction to Technical Drawing; Geometric Constructions; Pictorial Sketching; Orthographic Projection; Scale; Blueprint Interpretation; Dimensioning; Sectional Views.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week = 26 hrs total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hrs total

 

ENGR 1201 (Introduction to AutoCAD)

 

This is an introductory course designed to provide students with fundamental competency in the use of AutoCAD.

 

Introduction to CAD; Editing Existing Entities; Advanced Drawing Construction; Dimensioning Variables; Plotting.

 

Prerequisites - ENGR 1103 (Engineering Graphics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 0 hours/week = 0 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

ENGR 1202 (ROV Drafting & Blueprints)

 

This course is designed to develop the skills necessary for the student to interpret working drawings and prints common to industry. This course will also develop the necessary skills to produce engineering drawings using AutoCAD (computer aided drafting).

 

Drafting Fundamentals, Notes and Specifications, Dimensions, Bill of Materials, Sections, Working Drawings, Abbreviations and Symbols, Production and Processes, Welding Symbols, Piping Drawings, Electrical Drawings, Fasteners and Introduction to AutoCAD.

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours per week = 24 total hours

 

Laboratories - 6 hours per week = 36 total hours

 

ENGR 1302 (ROV Engineering Drawing)

 

This is an introductory level course designed to provide students with the basics of mechanical drafting and freehand sketching. Included will be topics addressing drafting fundamentals, use of drafting equipment, and informative retrieval from mechanical blueprints. This course is a basic drafting course and not a course directed to CAD.

 

Drafting Fundamentals; Applied Geometry; Orthographic Projection; Sectional Views; Dimensioning; Detail and Assemble Working Drawings.

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures/Labs - 5 hours/week = 25 hours

 

ENGR 1303 (ROV Drafting & Blueprints)

 

This course is designed to develop the skills necessary for the student to interpret working drawings and prints common to industry.

 

Drafting Fundamentals; Notes and Specifications; Dimensions; Bill of Materials; Sections; Working Drawings; Abbreviations and Symbols; Production and Processes; Welding Symbols; Piping Drawings; Electrical Drawings; Fasteners.

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours per week = 24 total hours

 

ENGR 2104 (Blueprint Reading)

 

This course is designed to develop the skills necessary for the student to interpret working drawings and prints common to industry.

 

Basic Fundamentals; Sketching; Notes and Specifications; Dimensions; Bill of Materials; Sections; Working Drawings; Abbreviations and Symbols; Production and Processes; Welding Symbols; Piping Drawings; Electrical Drawings; Hydraulic Drawings; Fasteners.

 

Lectures - 40 hours

 

ENGR 3100 (Blueprint Reading)

 

This course is designed to develop the skills necessary for the student to interpret working drawings and prints common to industry.

 

Basic Fundamentals; Sketching; Notes and Specifications; Dimensions; Bill of Materials; Sections; Working Drawings; Abbreviations and Symbols; Production and Processes; Welding Symbols; Piping Drawings; Electrical Drawings and Hydraulic Drawings.

 

Lectures - 40 hours

 

ENSY 1101 (Prime Movers & Auxiliary Power Plants)

 

This course is designed to provide the students with the engineering knowledge needed to participate in the design of ship power plants and systems.

 

Ship Power Plants; Marine Diesel Engines; Marine Gas Turbines; Marine Steam Generators; Marine Steam Turbines.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

ENSY 1102 (Ship Design Theory)

 

This is an introductory course designed to provide knowledge of the basic elements of ship design including vessel dimensions, hull form, structure and stability characteristics.

 

Ship Types and Purpose; The Ships Environment; Ship Construction Terminology; The Lines Plan; Coefficients of Form; Loads on a Ship; Structural Systems; Ship Piping

 

Corequisite: ENGR 1103 (Engineering Graphics)

 

Duration: 13 weeks

 

Lectures: 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

ENSY 1200 (Auxiliary Components)

 

This is an introductory course designed to give students a knowledge and understanding of the components required to design and construct the auxiliary piping systems of ships and offshore platforms.

 

Marine Materials; Piping for Marine Application; Valves; Strainers and Steam Traps; Piping Supports and Expansion Joints; Vibration Isolators; Pipe Insulation; Heat Exchangers; Piping Arrangement Drafting.

 

Prerequisite - ENGR 1100 (Engineering Graphics)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week

 

ENSY 1201 (Ship Types & Systems)

 

This is an introductory course designed to provide students with engineering knowledge about ship types.

 

Introduction to Modern Ship Concept; Ship Terminology; Materials Used in Ship Construction; Commercial Ships; Special Purpose Ships; Dynamically Supported Vessels; General Arrangement Drawing; Ship Operations Onboard M.I. Training Vessel; Propulsion Systems; Prime Movers; Pumping and Piping Systems; Control Systems; Marine Engineering Drawing.

 

Prerequisite - ENGR 1100 (Engineering Graphics)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

ENSY 1202 (Introduction to Marine Engineering Systems Design)

 

This is an introductory course designed to provide students with practical knowledge of the ship’s environment, ship terminology and various aspects of Marine Engineering Systems Design.

 

The Ship’s Environment; Ship Terminology; Hull Form; Pumps; Pumping and Piping Systems; Piping for Marine Applications; Valves.

 

Co-requisite - Engineering Graphics 1103

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 13 hours total

 

ENSY 2000 (Ship Engineering Design Process)

 

This course sets the methodology for the development of the student’s engineering design project. At the same time it offers an opportunity to assimilate some economic aspects by preparing an owner specification in conjunction with an economic study.

 

Analysis and Response to Request For Proposal; Indexing and Scheduling; Estimating Ship Construction Costs and Life Cycle Costing; Design Package Documentation; Relationship of Auxiliary Systems to Vessel Type; Quality Control in Shipbuilding.

 

Prerequisites - ENSY 1202 (Introduction to Marine Engineering Systems Design)

 

Co-requisite - CMSK 1201 (Communication at Work)

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week = 36 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 12 hours total

 

ENSY 2102 (Propulsion Technology)

 

This course is designed to provide the students of the Marine Engineering Systems Design program with the engineering knowledge needed to participate in the professional process of ship propulsion systems design.

 

Ship Propulsion Units Geometry and Function; Propulsion Shafting Design and Arrangement; Propulsion Shafting Components Design and Selection; Propellers; Thrusters; Reduction Gears and Other Transmission Systems; Electric Propulsion Motors; Ship Propulsion Shafting Vibration; Installation Procedures and Testing.

 

Prerequisites - ENSY 1202 (Introduction to Marine Engineering Systems Design): NARC 1102 (Ship Structural Geometry)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ENSY 2103 (Power & Resistance Technology)

 

This course introduces students to the concepts associated with ship movement and resistance. The course prepares students to perform calculations associated with propulsion and propeller selection.

 

Introduction to Ship Resistance; Ship Friction Resistance; Wave Making Resistance; Other Ship Resistance Components; Similarity and Model Testing; Ship Power and Propulsion; Screw Propellers; Propeller Ship Interaction; Propeller Series; Propeller Cavitation.

 

Prerequisites - Math 1101 (Introduction to Calculus); FLDS 2100 (Fluid Mechanics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week every week for 13 weeks = 26 hours - 65 hours total

 

ENSY 2200 (Auxiliary Systems I)

 

This is a technical course structured to give students the necessary knowledge of how auxiliary systems must function and the operational criteria which must be considered in order to design a given system. Various permutations are considered depending on vessels types. The end result will be the production by the student of his or her own vessel diagrams for the subject systems.

 

Tank Capacities; Bilge Systems, Ballast Systems; Fire Systems; Sea and Fresh Water Cooling Systems; Fuel Oil Systems.

 

Prerequisites - ENSY 1202 (Introduction to MESD); CMSK 1201 ( Technical Communications 2)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ENSY 2201 (Auxiliary Systems II)

 

This course completes the Auxiliary Systems aspect of the program, permitting the student to assimilate the functions and operating criteria and to apply them to the design of the systems listed below. Production of some systems in diagrammatic form will help in the assimilation of the subject matter.

 

Sanitary Supply and Discharge Systems; Lubricating Oil Systems; Compressed Air Systems; Exhaust Gases Systems and Gas Turbine Intakes; Hull Machinery Systems.

 

Prerequisite - ENSY 2200 (Auxiliary Systems I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ENSY 2202 (Ship’s Spaces Ventilation)

 

This course is designed to give the students a knowledge and understanding of how to calculate the heat accumulation from all operating equipment, size, select and produce drawings for the ventilation systems of all machinery spaces. All required components will be explained and assimilated.

 

Mechanical and Natural Ventilation; Ventilation Guidelines for Accommodations; Ventilation Guidelines for Control Rooms; Ventilation Guidelines for Machinery Spaces; Marine Ventilation Fans; Low and High Velocity Systems; Heating and Air Conditioning; Ventilation System Drafting.

 

Prerequisite - ENSY 1202 (Introduction to Marine Engineering Systems Design); ENSY 2201 (Auxiliary Systems)

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week = 36 hours

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week = 24 hours

 

ENSY 3000 (Cold Environment Design)

 

This is a technical course structured to give students comprehensive information and detailed knowledge of how the cold environment of the Arctic and Sub-Arctic impact on the design of ship operating in these regions. In addition, the students will learn how the engineer must apply the lessons learned in the past and use innovative ideas and techniques to design ice operating ship propulsion systems, auxiliary systems and equipment that are actually working in the cold environment.

 

Ice and Environmental Conditions; Propulsion of Icebreaking Ships; Selection of Propulsion Systems; Propulsion Shafting for Icebreaking Ships; Ship Service, Controls, Instrumentation and Electric Requirements; Cooling Systems for Icebreaking Ships; Icebreaking, Ice Releasing and Roll Stabilization Systems; Steering and Augmentation to Maneuverability in Ice; Protective Measures against the Cold Environment; Cold Design Special Features.

 

Prerequisites - ENSY 2102 (Propulsion Technology); ENSY 2201 (Auxiliary Systems)

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week = 36 hours total

 

ENSY 3002 (Offshore Platform Technology)

 

This is a technical course structured to give students a general idea of drilling operations and comprehensive information and details of how offshore platform are designed and how systems are designed and installed. The Auxiliary Systems, Power Plants, Controls, Production Systems, Floating Facility, Off Loading Method and Maintenance Vehicles are discussed and assimilated for functions and details.

 

Offshore Environmental Conditions; Type of Offshore Platforms and Operating Methods; Drilling Operations and Components used for Offshore Work; Platform and Auxiliary Systems Utilized both for Unit Operation or for Drilling Work; Sub-Sea Production and Remote Controls; Arctic Offshore Methods; Offshore Platform Protection from Freezing; Project.

 

Prerequisites - ENSY 2102 (Propulsion Technology); ENSY 2201 (Auxiliary Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ENSY 3102 (Propulsion Arrangement Design)

 

This course concentrates on the complete design and layout of ship propulsion systems. Students will learn to complete propulsion train drawings taking into account Shaft Diameters, Propellers, Bearings, Thrust Block, Couplings and Clutches capable of absorbing torsional and vibration forces.

 

Propulsion Shafting Design; Propeller Selection; Sterntubes and Glands Design; Bearings Selection; Reduction Gears Selection; Coupling and Clutches Selection; Brakes, Turning Gears and Chocking.

 

Prerequisites - ENSY 2102 (Propulsion Technology); ENSY 2103 (Power and Resistance Technology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ENSY 3103 (Ship Stability for MESD)

 

This course introduces the fundamentals of hydrostatics, ship stability and damage stability. It aims to develop an understanding of stability theory, criteria for stability assessment, and applicable regulations. Loadline and tonnage regulations, trim and stability books and industry software are studied. Emphasis is placed on application of the theory as related to ship systems and tanks.

 

Basic Hydrostatics; Ship Mass and Center of Mass; Longitudinal Stability and Trim; Small Angle Stability; Large Angle Stability; Tank Calibrations; Free Surface; Subdivision; Damaged Stability; Rules and Regulations, Required Submissions, and Testing; Tonnage, Freeboard, and Downflooding; Computer Applications.

 

Prerequisite - NARC 1102 (Ship Structural Geometry); PHYS 1100 (Physics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hour/week = 26 hours total

 

ENSY 3104 (Applied MESD)

 

This course will demonstrate the practical application of fundamental topics of marine engineering previously introduced in the program, including Fluids, Strength of Materials and Thermodynamics. Engineering analysis will be applied to various marine systems as emphasis is placed on application of the theory.

 

Applied Fluid Dynamics; Applied Strength of Materials; Applied Thermodynamics; Special Topics in Applied Marine Engineering Design.

 

Prerequisites - FLDS 2100 (Fluid Mechanics); MATH 2101 (Advanced Calculus); TRMO 2200 (Thermodynamics); MTPR 3100 (Strength of Materials)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 13 hours total

 

ENSY 3105 (Offshore & Subsea Systems)

 

This course provides a fundamental understanding of the technology and processes used for the design and construction of all types of offshore topside and subsea systems, including consideration of asset development, surveillance, and management. The content includes the full range of water depths from shallow water to ultra-deep-water and will also address life-cycle considerations in all phases of offshore field development and operation. All major components required for offshore developments, such as fixed and floating platforms, pipelines, and risers are discussed.

 

Overview of the Petroleum Industry; Offshore Exploration; Environmental Loadings; Drilling Vessel and Platform Types and Selection; Exploratory Drilling and Equipment; Topside Systems; Subsea Systems; Industry Agencies and Standards

 

Prerequisites - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

ENSY 3300 (Ship Engineering Project)

 

This course is structured so that the student will prepare the first phase of most documents required for a design project package. The results from other specialized courses are incorporated in the preparation of this Ship Engineering Project.

 

Machinery Arrangement; Ventilation Arrangement; Exhaust Arrangement; Sea Suction Technology; Bow Thruster Compartment; Auxiliaries.

 

Prerequisites - ENSY 2102 (Propulsion Technology); ENSY 2103 (Power and Resistance Technology); ENSY 2201 (Auxiliary Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour/week

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week

 

ENSY 3301 (Ship Engineering Project)

 

This course is structured to bring to completion, the preparation of the documents required for a design project package started with the course Systems Design Project 3100. In addition to original work the results of other specialized courses are also incorporated in the machinery arrangement of the ship engineering project.

 

Machinery Arrangement; Specification; Auxiliary Components Finishing; Calculation Book; Integration of Systems; Presentation Methods; Final All Day Exam.

 

Prerequisite - ENSY 3300 (Ship Engineering Project)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour/week

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week

 

ENSY 3302 (Marine Electrical Project)

 

This is a project course designed for advanced Marine Engineering Systems Design students. It is intended to familiarize the students with the design of the electrical system aboard ships and to enable them to complete the electrical design required for their technical project.

 

Planning; System Analysis; Project Research; System Design; Report Preparation; Report Presentation.

 

Prerequisite - ELTK 2102 (Marine Electrical Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week

 

ENSY 3303 (Auxiliary Machinery Arrangement)

 

This is a technical course that will enable students to determine the appropriate auxiliary systems, including control room equipment, to be included in their ship engineering project, and to determine their location in the design.

 

Engine Room Machinery, Equipment and Auxiliary Components; Sizing, Locating and Reducing Machinery and Auxiliary Components; Machinery Location and Engine Room Outfitting; Noise Control Strategies for Machinery; Specialized Systems.

 

Prerequisite - ENSY 2201 (Auxiliary Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

ENSY 3304 (Piping Arrangement Design)

 

This is a technical course structured to give students the required skills to produce drawings of piping arrangements to be fitted within the irregular and confined space of a ship’s machinery compartment. In addition students will learn how to select components, avoid interferences, minimize drafting time, produce a Bill of Material and perform final calculations. They will also acquire techniques to produce pipe spooling using modern methodologies.

 

Component Selection; Piping Arrangement Techniques; Piping Arrangement Layout; Development of Drawings; Pipe Spooling Technique; Bill of Material and Drawing Components Identification; Velocity and Sizing Calculations Checks.

 

Prerequisite - ENSY 2201 (Auxiliary Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week

 

ENSY 3305 (Project Presentation)

 

This course will showcase work completed on student project vessels and will demonstrate the practical application of resolving a design problem through applied research. Definition of the problem, analysis and potential technical solutions to the design problem will be established through research and presented to an audience of peers.

 

Design Problem Definition; Generation of Alternatives and Solutions; Evaluation of Solutions; Presentation Techniques.

 

Prerequisite - ENSY 3301 (Ship Engineering Project); ENSY 3302 (Marine Electrical Project); ENSY 3303 (Auxiliary Machinery Arrangement); ENSY 3304 (Piping Arrangement Design)

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 24 hours

 

Laboratories - 6 hours/week = 36 hours

 

FDTE 1100 (Introduction to Food Science & Technology)

 

An introductory course that describes the fields of food science and food technology including introductions to nutrition, food chemistry, microbiology, and food processing. Selected aspects of marketing and product development will also be introduced. Size, scope, functions and contemporary problems of the food industry will be discussed. The laboratory component will involve a study of common methods of food processing/preservation.

 

Food Science and Technology; Characteristics of the Food Industry; Food Constituents; Nutrition; Food Changes: Causes and Control; Food Processing; Marketing and Product Development; Specialty Foods; Issues.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 39 hours (3 hours/week)

 

Laboratories - 26 hours (2 hours/week)

 

FDTE 2103 (Food Engineering Principles)

 

This is an advanced level course designed to provide the student with a rudimentary understanding of food engineering principles enabling students to comprehend food engineering applications and unit operations.

 

Introduction; Energy and Mass; Liquid Food Transport/Rheology; Energy for Food Processing; Heat Transfer in Food Processing; Refrigeration; Freezing of Food; Evaporation; Psychometrics; Dehydration of Foods.

 

Prerequisites - MATH 1200 (Calculus); PHYS 1200 (Physics)

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 26 hours

 

FDTE 2104 (Seminar Series)

 

This course will present participants with selected topics of relevance to food technology.

 

Current Issues in Food Technology

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

FDTE 2105 (Nutrition)

 

This course provides the basics concepts in nutrition and introduces the nutrients of importance to human nutrition.

 

Nutrients and Nourishment; Nutrition Guidelines and Assessment; Digestion and Absorption; Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre; Lipids; Proteins; Minerals and Vitamins; Water.

 

Prerequisite - FDTE 1100 (Introduction to Food Science & Technology)

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

FDTE 2112 (Food Hygiene & Food Safety)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of sanitation and to provide students the necessary tools to design, and implement and effective sanitation program.

Sanitation Programs for Food Plants; Hazard Avoidance and Quality Management; Cleaning and Sanitizing; Micro-organisms; Personal Hygiene; Pest and Pest Control; Food Plant Design and Equipment Design; Sanitation of Incoming Materials; Water Sanitation; Allergens; Waste Treatment; Food Regulations.

 

Prerequisite - BIOL 1100 (Biology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks instruction

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

FDTE 2118 (Canned Foods & Thermal Processing)

 

This is an industry training course providing competencies relevant to thermal processing operations. Principles of HACCP require that personnel be appropriately trained for roles in food processing establishments. Acts and Regulations enforced by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency require control over food contamination. The Facilities Inspection Manual, stemming from the Fish Inspection Regulations, requires that, “The designated person in control of the retort operations has successfully completed a recognized course in thermal processing and retort operation.”

 

Introduction to Site Microbiology; Product Preparation; Processing Equipment and Procedure; Container Integrity; Post Container Handling; Incubation; Regulations and Codes of Practice.

 

Prerequisite - High School graduation OR recommended by employer

 

Duration - 5 days (35 hours)

 

FDTE 2201 (Seafood Processing Technology)

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the techniques and technology involved in the production of seafood products.

 

Fisheries Overview; Preservation Methods; Primary Processing; Secondary Processing; By-products Utilization.

 

Prerequisites - QLAS 2104 (Food Evaluation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week

 

FDTE 2202 (Food Processing I)

 

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of protein foods, their composition and their role in the food industry. Students are also provided with an overview of the role of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in the production and processing of those foods.

 

Business Aspects; Red Meat; Poultry and Eggs; Dairy Production; Seafood; Government Regulations.

 

Prerequisites - BIOL 1100 (Biology); FDTE 1100 (Introduction to Food Science and Technology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week

 

FDTE 3100 (Food Engineering - Unit Operations)

 

This is an advanced level course designed to introduce food engineering unit operations to students.

 

Introduction; Preliminary Operations; Conversion Operations; Preservation Operations; Materials Handling.

 

Prerequisite - FDTE 2103 (Food Engineering Principles)

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 26 hours

 

FDTE 3101 (Food Biotechnology)

 

This is an advanced level course designed to provide the student with an understanding of the various aspects of food biotechnology.

 

Overview: Food Biotechnology; Tools of Biotechnology; Cell Culture Technology; Plant Cell Culture; Fermentation Technology; Enzyme Technology; Immobilization Technology; Applications in Agriculture; Applications in Food; Marine Biotechnology; Safety of Foods Developed by Biotechnology; Biotechnology in Waster Management in Food Industry; Biosensors for Biological Monitoring; Safety and Regulatory Issues of Biotechnology-derived Foods.

 

Prerequisites - BIOL 2202 (Food Microbiology); CHEM 2103 (Organic Chemistry); FDTE 3107 (Food Processing II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

FDTE 3102 (Food Safety Enhancement Program/Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point)

 

This course provides participants with an understanding of the concepts, principles, terminology, and skills required for the development, implementation, maintenance, validation and reassessment, and auditing of the FSEP/HACCP system within food processing establishments.

 

Introduction to HACCP and FSEP; FSEP Prerequisite Programs; Development of a HACCP Plan; Hazard Analysis; Critical Control Point Determination; Validation and Reassessment of the HACCP Plan; Audit Principles.

 

Duration - 3 days

 

FDTE 3103 (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point)

 

This course is designed to provide participants with an understanding of requirements of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) system that exists in federally registered fish processing establishments.

 

HACCP System; HACCP Program Development; Preliminary Steps of HACCP Development; Conduct a Hazard Analysis (HACCP Principle # 1); Determine Critical Control Points (HACCP Principle # 2); Establish Critical Limits (HACCP Principle # 3); Establish Monitoring Procedures (HACCP Principle # 4); Establish Corrective Action Procedures (HACCP Principle # 5); Establish Verification Procedures (HACCP Principle # 6); Establish Documentation and Record Keeping (HACCP Principle # 7).

 

Duration - 2 days

 

FDTE 3104 (Quality Management Program)

 

This course is designed to provide participants with an understanding of requirements of the Quality Management Program (QMP) that exist in federally registered fish processing establishments.

 

QMP Reference Standard; Management Roles and Responsibilities; Background Product and Process Information; Prerequisite Plan; Regulatory Action Point (RAP) Plan; Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) Plan; Verification and Maintenance of the QMP Plan; Record Keeping; Auditing of the QMP Plan.

 

Duration - 3 days

 

FDTE 3106 (Seafood Processing Technology)

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the techniques and technology involved in the production of seafood products.

 

Fisheries Overview; Preservation Methods; Primary Processing; Secondary Processing; By-products Utilization.

 

Prerequisites - QLAS 2104 (Food Evaluation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hour total

 

FDTE 3107 (Food Processing II)

 

This course is an advanced level course designed to provide the student with an understanding of a variety of food processing techniques for foods of plant origin.

 

Introduction to Food Processing; Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Processing; Jams, Jellies and Fruit Spreads; Fruit Juice and Other Beverage Processing; Processing of Edible Fats and Oils of Plant Origin; Cereals, Grains and Starches; Soybean Technology; Sugars, Sweeteners and Confectionary Products; Food Hydrocolloids.

 

Prerequisites - BIOL 2102 (Microbiology) or BIOL 2105 (Microbiology); FDTE 2103 (Food Engineering Principles); FDTE 2112 (Food Sanitation); FDTE 2202 (Food Processing I)

 

Co-requisites - CHEM 3100 (Chemistry)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week = 39 total hours

 

FDTE 3108 (An Introduction to Food Manufacturing Food Safety Standards)

 

This course provides participants with an understanding of the concepts, requirements, terminology, and skills required for the implementation, certification and maintenance of a third-party food manufacturing food safety standard within food processing establishments.

 

Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI); Governance of the Food Safety Standards; British Retail Consortium Standard (BRC); Safe Quality Food Standard (SQF); Food Safety System Certification 22000 (FSSC 22000); Global Red Meat Standard (GRMS); International Features Standard (IFS).

 

Duration - 3 days

 

FDTE 4100 (World Food Industry Overview)

 

This introductory course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the food industry. The course covers the history of foods, preservation methods, packaging, food safety, and the other various components that make up the food industries.

 

History of World Food Production; Food and Human Consumption; Processes for Food Preservation; Packaging of Foods; Food Safety; Meat, Poultry and Fish; Fruit and Vegetables Industry; Dairy Industry.

 

Duration - 39 hours total

 

Lectures - 39 hours total

 

FDTE 4102 (Food Inspection Techniques)

 

This course is designed to provide general guidelines useful for a wide range of inspection activities for monitoring the safety and quality of foods.

 

Overview of Food Safety; General Inspection Approach; Sampling; Consumer Reactions to Food Safety Crises; Subjective and Objective Methods; Special Investigations; Evidence Development; Risk Management; Export-Import Surveillance; Foreign Bodies in Food.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week = 39 hours total

 

FDTE 4104 (Food-Borne Diseases/Toxicology)

 

This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge of the biological and chemical agents associated with foods and their effect on human health.

 

Introduction; Chemical Toxicants in Food: an Overview; Naturally Occurring Toxicants; Unnatural Chemical Agents: Accidental; Unnatural Chemical Agents: Additives; Nutritional Biohazards; Food Irradiation; Food Sensitivities; Food Processing, Nutritional Quality and Safety; Biological Agents.

 

Lectures - 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 39 hours total

 

FDTE 4105 (Food Hygiene & Food Safety)

 

This course is designed to provide students with an detailed information concerning sanitation and good hygiene practices.The course will enable students to set policies and design cost-effective programs.

 

Introduction; Regulations and Buyer Drive Programs Affecting Food Sanitation; Microbiology; The Control of Microorganisms; Cleaning and Sanitization Practices; Pest Control; Industry Specific Sanitation Considerations; Elements of an Effective Sanitation Program; Facility Design, Maintenance and Construction.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours per week = 26 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

FDTE 4110 (Introduction to Water & Wastewater Treatment)

 

This course is designed as an introduction to water and wastewater treatment systems to provide a foundation for further study in the subject.

 

Water Process Treatment Train; Wastewater Process Treatment Train.

 

Duration - 7 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

FDTE 4111 (Food Processing)

 

This introductory course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of food processing. The course covers the history of food processing and provides an overview of processing in the meat, poultry and egg, dairy, seafood, grains, and fruits and vegetables sectors of the food industry. It also covers food preservation methods and packaging considerations, two vital and integral components relevant to all sectors of the food processing industry.

 

History of Food; Meat Processing; Poultry and Egg Production/Processing; Dairy Processing; Seafood Processing; Cereals, Grains and Starches; Fruits and Vegetables; Food Preservation Methods; Packaging.

 

Prerequisites - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours per week = 52 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once every 3 weeks (during weeks 3, 6 and 9 in the schedule) = 6 total hours

 

FDTE 4203 (Water & Wastewater Processing 1)

 

This course is designed to enhance the student’s understanding of the technical skills required for water and wastewater treatment processes. It will focus on system analysis and trouble shooting.

 

Basic Fluid Mechanics; Water Treatment Operations; Wastewater Treatment Operations; Water Stabilization.

 

Prerequisite - FDTE 4110 (Introduction to Water and Wastewater Treatment)

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 26 hours

 

FDTE 4204 (Water & Wastewater Processing II)

 

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of water and wastewater systems operation and maintenance emphasizing trouble shooting, efficiency, liability and safety.

 

Instrumentation and Controls Systems for Water and Wastewater Systems; Water Distribution System Operation and Maintenance; Water Treatment Plant Operation and Maintenance; Wastewater Collection System Operation and Maintenance; Wastewater Treatment Plant Operation and Maintenance; Septic Tanks and Associated Pumps; Safety; Administration and Record Keeping.

 

Prerequisite - FDTE 4203 (Water and Wastewater Processing I)

 

Lectures - 40 Hours (8 hours per week for 5 weeks)

 

Laboratories - 24 Hours (6 hours per week for 4 weeks)

 

FIRE 0011 (Firefighter - Level 1)

 

This introductory level course is designed to provide the student with the theoretical and practical training to function as an integral member of a firefighting team. It meets and/or exceeds National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1001 Professional Standards.

 

Firefighter Orientation; Firefighter Safety and Health; Fire Behaviour; Building Construction; Firefighter Personal Protective Equipment; Portable Fire Extinguishers; Ropes and Knots; Rescue and Extrication; Forcible Entry; Ground Ladders; Ventilation; Water Supply; Fire Hose; Fire Streams; Fire Control; Fire Detection, Alarm and Suppression Systems; Loss Control; Protecting Fire Scene Evidence; Fire Department Communications.

 

Prerequisites - FIRE 0027 (Advanced Medical First Responder Level II (80 hours))

 

NOTE: Successful completion of NFPA 472 Hazardous Materials Awareness and Operations is required in order to receive Certification in NFPA 1001 – Firefighter – Level I

 

Duration - 25 days

 

Lectures - 10 days

 

Practical Exercises - 15 days

 

FIRE 0021 (Level C - CPR)

 

An approved training provider will deliver this one-day course.

 

FIRE 0026 (Marine Based Fire Fighting For Land-Based Firefighters (Awareness Level))

 

This course introduces the land-based firefighter to the many aspects of marine firefighting that require special attention due to the unique environment encountered onboard vessels.

 

Marine Terminals; Piers and Wharves; Vessel Familiarization and Basic Vessel Construction; Types of Vessels; Vessel Fire Control Plan; Interior Construction: Structural Fire Protection; Marine Environment; Authority of Emergency Responders.

 

Prerequisite - FIRE 0011 (Firefighter - Level I)

 

Duration - 3 days (21 hours)

 

FIRE 0027 (Advanced Medical First Responder Level II (80 hours)

 

An approved training provider will deliver this 10-day course.

 

FIRE 0030 (Fire Pumper Driver/Operator)

 

This course is designed to give students the knowledge to operate and to maintain a fire pumper in safe working condition.

 

The Driver/Operator; Types of Fire Apparatus Equipped with a Fire Pump; Introduction to Apparatus Inspection and Maintenance; Operating Emergency Vehicles; Positioning Apparatus; Fire Pump Theory; Operating Fire Pumps; Static Water Supply Sources; Relay Pumping Operations; Water Shuttle Operations; Foam Equipment and Systems; Apparatus Testing; What is Water and Where it Comes From; Fire Hose Nozzles and Flow Rates; Theoretical Pressure Calculations; Fire Ground Hydraulic Calculations.

 

Prerequisites - Entry into the Fire Rescue Program

 

NOTE: Successful completion of NFPA 1001 - Firefighter - Level I is required for those participants who intend to complete the NFPA 1002 testing for Fire Pumper Driver/Operator

 

Duration - 15 days

 

Lectures - 5 days

 

Practical - 8 days

 

Testing - 2 days

 

FIRE 0032 (Rescue Technician)

 

This is a basic Rescue Technician course that introduces the student to both the theoretical and practical aspects of rescue techniques. This course incorporates high angle rescue, confined space entry, and rescue and vehicle extrication techniques to meet NFPA 1006 standard.

 

Personal Protective Equipment; Rope and High Angle Rescue Equipment; Rappelling Techniques; Ascending Techniques; Rescue Techniques; Confined Spaces; Detection Equipment; Purging and Ventilating; Entry Procedures; Confined Space Rescue; Psychological Aspects of a Confined Space Rescue; Vehicle Construction; Extrication Equipment; Extrication Procedures; and Extrication Equipment Maintenance.

 

Prerequisites - Fire 0027 (Emergency Medical Responder (80 hours); FIRE 0011(Firefighter I) OR Basic Fire Fighting Certificate; Medical Clearance according to MI policy

 

Duration - 20 days

 

Theory - 7.5 days

 

Practical - 12.5 days

 

FIRE 0034 (Firefighter II)

 

This course is designed to provide the student with the theoretical and practical training to function as an integral member of a firefighting team. It meets and/or exceeds National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1001 Professional Standards.

 

Building Construction; Rescue and Extrication; Water Supply; Fire Hose; Fire Streams; Fire Control; Fire Detection, Alarm and Suppression Systems; Protecting Fire Scene Evidence; Fire Department Communications; Fire Prevention and Public Fire Education; Live-Fire Scenario Training; Aerial Ladder Climb; Physical-Fitness Testing; Professional Development.

 

Prerequisites - FIRE 0011 (Firefighter - Level I)

 

NOTE: Certification in NFPA 1001 Firefighter Level I is required only for those participants who intend to complete the NFPA 1001 Firefighter Level II certification testing.

 

Duration - 20 days

 

Lectures - 4 days

 

Practical Exercises - 4 days

 

NFPA Level II Testing - 2 days

 

Live-Fire Scenario Training - 6 days

 

Aerial Ladder Climb - 1 day

 

Physical Fitness Testing - 1 day

 

Professional Development - 2 days

 

FIRE 0035 (Hazardous Materials Operations)

 

This is an introductory level course designed to enable students to identify dangerous goods incidents and to properly respond to hazardous materials situations under the guidelines of Hazardous Materials Operations.

 

Chemical Properties and Hazardous Materials Behaviour, Incident Management; Strategic Goals and Tactical Objectives; Terrorist Attacks, Criminal Activities and Disasters; Personal Protective Equipment (PPE); Decontamination; Product Control; Air Monitoring and Sampling; Victim Rescue and Recovery; Evidence Preservation and Sampling; Illicit Laboratories.

 

Prerequisite - FIRE 0036 (Hazardous Materials Awareness)

 

NOTE: To be certified to the NFPA 472 - Hazardous Materials Operations Level, successful completion of NFPA 472 Hazardous Materials Awareness is required.

 

Duration - 7.5 days (45 hours)

 

Theory - 5.5 days (33 hours)

 

Practical Exercises - 1 day (6 hours)

 

Testing - 1 day (6 hours)

 

FIRE 0036 (Hazardous Materials Awareness)

 

This is an introductory level course designed to enable students to identify dangerous goods incidents and properly perform isolation and evacuation procedures.

 

Introduction to Hazardous Materials; Hazardous Materials Identification; Awareness-Level Actions at Hazardous Materials Incidents.

 

Prerequisite - Entry into the Fire Rescue Program

 

Duration - 2.5 days (17.5 hours)

 

Theory - 1.5 days (10.5 hours)

 

Practical Exercises - 0.5 days (3.5 hours)

 

Testing - 0.5 days (3.5 hours)

 

FIRE 0037M Technical Rescuer (Vehicle Rescue Level I & II)

 

Level I:

 

This is a Technical Rescuer Course that introduces the student to both the theoretical and practical aspects of Vehicle and Machinery Extrication Techniques. This course incorporates Vehicle and Machinery Extrication and Core Skill (Chapter 5) Techniques to meet or exceed National Fire Protection Association (NFPA 1006) Professional Standards, Level I.

 

Level II:

 

This is a Technical Rescuer Course that introduces the student to the more advanced theoretical and practical aspects of extrication focusing on Heavy Vehicle and Machinery Extrication Techniques. This course incorporates Vehicle and Machinery Extrication Level II Core Skill Techniques to meet or exceed National Fire Protection Association (NFPA 1006) Professional Standards, Level II.

 

Level I:

 

Introduction to Vehicle and Machinery Extrication; Extrication Incident Management; Vehicle Anatomy and Science; Extrication Equipment; Extrication Techniques; Passenger Vehicle Extrication; Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Rescue Considerations.

 

Level II:

 

Heavy Vehicle and Machinery Classification; Bus Extrication; Medium and Heavy Truck Extrication; Railcar Extrication; Industrial / Agricultural Vehicle and Machinery Extrication; Specialized Heavy Vehicle and Machinery Extrication; Heavy Vehicle and Machinery Incident Assessment; Hazards Associated with Heavy Vehicles and Machinery; Extrication Tools and Equipment for Heavy Vehicles and Machinery; Heavy Vehicle and Machinery Stabilization; Victim Removal from Heavy Vehicles and Machinery.

 

Prerequisites - FIRE 0038M - Technical Rescuer (Rope Rescue Level I and II)

 

NOTE: For successful completion of NFPA 1006 Technical Rescuer - Vehicle Extrication Certification, students must have successfully completed certification in NFPA 1006 for CORE and also certification will not be received for Level II until successful completion of Vehicle and Machinery Extrication Level I.

 

Duration - Classroom - 5 days

 

Practical - 5 days

 

Total - 10 days

 

Please note that in addition to the 10 days duration above there will be a Complete Skills Review and NFPA Testing component to be shared among the three Technical Rescuer Courses (Rope Rescue, Confined Space and Vehicle Extrication) that will amount to another 10 days.

 

FIRE 0038M Technical Rescuer (Rope Rescue Level I & II)

 

Level I and II:

 

This is a Technical Rescuer Course that introduces the student to the theoretical, practical, and advanced aspects of Rope Rescue Techniques. This course incorporates the High Angle and Core Skill (Chapter 5) techniques to meet or exceed National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1006 professional standards, Levels I and II.

 

Level I:

 

Introduction to Rope Rescue; Incident Planning and Scene Management; Safety; Equipment and System Components; Knots; Anchor Systems; Belaying; Rappelling; Lowering Systems; Mechanical Advantages, Raising, and Ascending Systems.

 

Level II:

 

Rappelling Operations; Lowering Systems; Mechanical Advantages; Raising, and Ascending Systems; Tensioned Rope Systems.

 

Prerequisites - FIRE 0011 (Firefighter - Level I)

 

NOTE: For successful completion of NFPA 1006 Technical Rescuer - Rope Rescue students must have successfully completed certification in NFPA 1006 for CORE and also certification will not be received for Level II until successful completion of Rope Rescue Level

 

Duration - Classroom - 5 days

 

Practical - 5 days

 

Total - 10 days

 

Please note that in addition to the 10 days duration above there will be a Complete Skills Review and NFPA Testing component to be shared among the three Technical Rescuer Courses (Rope Rescue, Confined Space and Vehicle Extrication) that will amount to another 10 days.

 

FIRE 0039M Technical Rescuer (Confined Space Rescue Level I & II)

 

Level I and II:

 

This is a Technical Rescuer Course that introduces the student to both the theoretical and practical aspects of Confined Space Rescue Techniques. This course meets or exceeds National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1006, Level I professional standards.

 

Level I:

 

Introduction to Confined Spaces; Confined Space Entry Requirements; Using the Incident Command System; Strategic Rescue Factors; Safety; Rescue Operations and Considerations; Air Monitoring; Ventilation and Inerting; Rescue Equipment; Team Evaluation.

 

Level II:

 

Confined Spaces and Their Hazards; Confined Space Entry Requirements; Using the Incident Command System; Strategic Rescue Factors; Rescue Operations and Considerations; Air Monitoring; Ventilation and Inerting; Lockout / Tagout; Team Evaluation.

 

Prerequisites - FIRE 0038M (Technical Rescuer (Rope Rescue Level I and Ii)

 

NOTE: Certification in NFPA 1006 Confined Space Entry Level I must be successfully completed before receiving certification in NFPA 1006 Confined Space Entry Level II

 

Duration - 5 days

 

Practical - 5 days

 

Total - 10 days

 

Please note that in addition to the 10 days duration above there will be a Complete Skills Review and NFPA Testing component to be shared among the three Technical Rescuer Courses (Rope Rescue, Confined Space and Vehicle Extrication) that will amount to another 10 days.

 

FIRE 0040 (Flashover Recognition)

 

This course provides theoretical and practical skills to enable students to recognize the signs of a flashover situation and be able to react accordingly for their personal safety.

 

Fire Development in a Compartment; Fire Control Theory; Flashover Safety.

 

Prerequisites - FIRE0011 (Firefighter - Level 1)

 

Duration - 7 hours

 

Theory - 4 hours

 

Practical - 3 hours

 

FIRE 0041 (Advanced Medical First Responder Level I (40 hours))

 

An approved training provider will deliver this 5-day course.

 

FIRE 0042 (Air Brake Class 3 Driver's License)

 

An approved training provider will deliver this course.

 

FITE 0001 (Introduction to Fishing Gear Construction & Repair)

 

This course introduces participants to fishing gear construction and repair.

 

Introduction to Trawls; Basic Net Making Knowledge; Basic Net Repair; Application of Conservation Technologies; Mobile Gear Construction and Repair Techniques; Trawl Operations and Further Equipment; Net Making for Fixed Gears; Principles and Uses of Rope and Wire.

 

Duration -10 days

 

FITE 0002 (Introduction to Construction & Stability for Fishing Vessels)

 

Fishing vessel construction and stability are important, interconnected areas of study to ensure the safe operation and handling of fishing vessels. It is essential that vessel operators have a good understanding of the relationships that exist between the vessels shape, builder’s plans and how a completed hull operates in a marine environment. This course is specifically directed towards fishing vessel operators and deals with the basic theory and application of construction and stability as it applies to fishing vessels in various conditions of load.

 

Basic Ship Measurement and Design Terminology; Hull Shapes and Structural Terminology; Vessel Seaworthiness and Regulatory Requirements; Essential Vessel Systems and Inspection Protocol; Basic Ship Stability Terminology; Basic Transverse Stability Principles; Interpreting Righting Lever Curves; Basic Longitudinal Stability Principles; Principles of Free Surface Effect, Freeboard and Reserve Buoyancy; Anti Roll Devices and Vessel Stability; Vessel Modifications and Its Effect on Stability; Interpreting Stability Booklet Data; Effect of Fishing Operations on Vessel Stability; Environmental Effects on Stability - The Dynamics.

 

Duration - 10 Days (70 Hours)

 

FITE 0004 (Information Systems in Fisheries)

 

This course has been developed to enable the fish harvester to maximize the use of the computer at sea. This course includes distinct components of electronic navigation, managing fishing data, collision avoidance and communication.

 

The Windows® Operating System Environment; Electronic Navigational Chart ~ Definitions, Concepts and Related Authorities; Legal Aspects and Requirements for Fishing Vessels; Sensors and Interfaces; Electronic Chart Data; Navigating with the Electronic Charting System; Passage Planning with the Electronic Chart; Executing and Monitoring the Passage Plan; System Status Alarms and Indicators; Risk of Over-reliance; Fishing Data Management; Back-up Arrangements; Collision Avoidance Information Management; Bottom Mapping; Communications.

 

Prerequisites - Chartwork and Pilotage - Level 1 (C/P 1) ) or equivalent

 

Duration - 70 hours = 10 days

 

FITE 0005 (Ropework)

 

This course is designed to develop the participant’s ability to understand the design and construction of various types of rope, maintenance and inspection of ropes, and regulations governing rope usage. It will include rope safety, rope use and maintenance for small vessels, and moorings and anchoring.

 

Ropes; Knots, Bends and Hitches; Ropework/Working with Ropes; Rope Safety; Mooring and Anchoring.

 

Duration - 2.5 days

 

FLDS 1200 (Introduction to Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulics)

 

This course is designed as an introduction to the laws and principles that govern Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics. Students will be able to apply these principles to relevant Electro-Mechanical applications.

 

Introduction to Fluid Mechanics: Work and Energy of Fluids in Motion, , Steady Flow of Ideal Fluids, Hydraulic Principles, Hydraulic System and Schematics, Hydraulic Fluids, Hydraulic Hoses and Pipes, Seals and Packing, Reservoir Design and Function, Contamination Control and Filtration, Linear Activators, Pumps and Motors, Directional Control Valves, Pressure Control Valves, Flow Control Valves, Hydraulic System Accessories, Troubleshooting.

 

Prerequisites - PHYS 1100 (Physics) or PHYS 1101 (Physics) or PHYS 1102 (Physics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week every second week for 6 labs = 12 hours

 

FLDS 2100 (Fluid Mechanics)

 

This is an introductory Fluid Mechanics course designed to develop both the knowledge of the laws and principles governing Fluid Mechanics and the ability to apply this knowledge in analyzing related engineering applications. The course also provides a base for advanced courses in piping design, ducting design, and fluid power systems.

 

Introduction to Fluid Mechanics; Forces on Submerged Surfaces; Work and Energy of Fluids in Motion; Steady Flow of Incompressible Fluids; Flow Measurement.

 

Prerequisites - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus) or MATH 1102 (Pre-Calculus); PHYS 1100 (Physics) or PHYS 1101 (Physics) or PHYS 1103 (Physics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks instruction, exclusive of final examination

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week every second week for 6 labs = 12 hours

 

FLDS 2105 (Fluid Mechanics)

 

This is an introductory Fluid Mechanics course designed to develop both the knowledge of the laws and principles governing Fluid Mechanics and the ability to apply this knowledge in analyzing related engineering applications. The course also provides a base for advanced courses in piping design, ducting design, and fluid power systems.

 

Introduction to Fluid Mechanics; Forces on Submerged Surfaces; Work and Energy of Fluids in Motion; Steady Flow of Incompressible Fluids; Flow Measurement.

 

Prerequisites - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus); PHYS 1103 (Physics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks instruction, exclusive of final examination

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week every second week for 6 labs = 12 hours

 

FLDS 2106 (Introduction to Fluid Statics & Dynamics)

 

This course is designed as an introduction to the laws and principles that govern Fluid Mechanics. Students will be able to apply these principles to relevant ROV applications.

 

Introduction to Fluid Mechanics; Forces on Submerged Surfaces; Buoyancy, Forces due to Fluids in Motion, Drag.

 

Duration - 3 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week = 18 hours total

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 3 hours total

 

FLDS 2107 (Hydraulic Controls)

 

This is an intermediate level course designed for students in the Remotely Operated Vehicles Operator Program.

 

Hydraulic Principles; Hydraulic Systems and Schematics; Hydraulic Fluids; Hydraulic Hoses and Pipes; Seals and Packing; Reservoir, Design and Function; Contamination Control and Filtration; Linear Activators; Pumps and Motors; Directional Control Valves; Pressure Control; Flow Control; Hydraulic System Accessories.

 

Duration - 10 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

FLDS 2108 (Introduction to Fluid Statics, Dynamics & Hydraulics)

 

This course is designed as an introduction to the laws and principles that govern Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics. Students will be able to apply these principles to relevant ROV applications.

 

Introduction to Fluid Mechanics; Forces on Submerged Surfaces; Buoyancy and Stability; Work and Energy of Fluids in Motion; Steady Flow of Ideal Fluids; Drag; Hydraulic Principles; Hydraulic System and Schematics; Hydraulic Fluids; Hydraulic Hoses and Pipes; Seals and Packing; Reservoir Design and Function; Contamination Control and Filtration; Flow Control Valves; Directional Control Valves; Pressure Control; Hydraulic System Accessories.

 

Co-requisite - PHYS 1100 (Physics) or PHYS 1101 (Physics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours every second week for a total of 5 labs = 10 hours total

 

FLDS 2109 (Advanced Hydraulics)

 

This course exposes students to more advanced fluid power components and applications by focusing on advanced pump controls, accumulators, intensifiers, servo and proportional electrohydraulics and electrohydraulic troubleshooting.

 

Hydraulic Principles; Advanced Pump Controls; Accumulators and Intensifiers; Electrohydraulic Components and Systems; Electrohydraulic Servo and Proportional Systems; Electrohydraulic Troubleshooting.

 

Prerequisite - Either: FLDS 1200 (Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics); FLDS 2108 (Introduction to Fluid Statics, Dynamics & Hydraulics); FLDS 2201 (Marine Hydraulics); FLDS 3100 (Hydraulics and Pneumatics); or FLDS 3105 (Hydraulics and Pneumatics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours every second week for a total of 5 labs = 10 hours total

 

FLDS 2201 (Marine Hydraulics)

 

This intermediate course is designed to provide Marine Engineering Systems Design students with the engineering knowledge needed to analyze hydraulic installations, specify components, and design shipboard hydraulic systems.

 

Principles of Power Hydraulics, Hydraulic Fluids and Reservoirs, Hydraulic Piping and Fittings, Seals and Packing, Components of Hydraulic Systems, Hydraulic Pumps and Motors (Rotary Actuators), Marine Applications of Hydraulics.

 

Prerequisite - ENSY 1202 (Introduction to Marine Engineering Systems Design); PHYS 1200 (Physics), FLDS 2100 (Fluid Mechanics)

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week = 36 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week for 6 labs = 12 hours

 

FLDS 3100 (Hydraulics & Pneumatics)

 

This is an intermediate level course designed primarily for students in the Marine Engineering Technology program.

 

Hydraulic Principles; Hydraulic System and Schematics; Hydraulic Fluids; Hydraulic Hoses and Pipes; Seals and Packing; Reservoir, Design and Function; Contamination Control and Filtration; Linear Activators; Pumps and Motors; Directional Control Valves; Pressure Control; Flow Control; Hydraulic System Accessories; Pneumatic Principles; Air Compressors and Receivers; Air Distribution and Auxiliary Equipment.

 

Prerequisite - PHYS 1100 (Physics) or PHYS 1101 (Physics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

FLDS 3105 (Hydraulics & Pneumatics)

 

This is an intermediate level course designed primarily for students in the Marine Engineering Technology program.

 

Hydraulic Principles; Hydraulic System and Schematics; Hydraulic Fluids; Hydraulic Hoses and Pipes; Seals and Packing; Reservoir, Design and Function; Contamination Control and Filtration; Linear Activators; Pumps and Motors; Directional Control Valves; Pressure Control; Flow Control; Hydraulic System Accessories; Pneumatic Principles; Air Compressors and Receiver; Air Distribution and Auxiliary Equipment.

 

Prerequisite - PHYS 1103 (Physics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

FLDS 3106 (Introduction to Fluid Statics & Dynamics)

 

This course is designed as an introduction to the laws and principles that govern Fluid Mechanics. Students will be able to apply these principles to relevant ROV applications.

 

Introduction to Fluid Mechanics; Forces on Submerged Surfaces; Buoyancy, Forces due to Fluids in Motion, Drag.

 

Duration - 3 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week = 18 hours total

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 3 hours total

 

FLDS 3107 (Hydraulic Controls)

 

This is an intermediate level course designed for students in the Remotely Operated Vehicles Operator Program.

 

Hydraulic Principles; Hydraulic Systems and Schematics; Hydraulic Fluids; Hydraulic Hoses and Pipes; Seals and Packing; Reservoir, Design and Function; Contamination Control and Filtration; Linear Activators; Pumps and Motors; Directional Control Valves; Pressure Control; Flow Control; Hydraulic System Accessories.

 

Duration - 10 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

FRMG 0001 (Fisheries Resource Management)

 

This course is designed to familiarize fishers with the principles and techniques involved in fisheries management.

 

The Fishery Resource; Why Manage? Understanding the Goals of Fisheries Management; The Methods Employed in Fisheries Management; Managing Our Resources; Agencies and Organizations Involved in Research and Decision-making in Fisheries Resource Management; Sharing Our Resources; Foreign Fishing in the Northwest Atlantic; Responsible Fishing; Owner Operation/Fleet Separation; Stewardship.

 

Duration - 5 days

 

GEOG 1300 (Surveying & GPS)

 

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of survey techniques. It will introduce students to measurement techniques associated with distance, direction and leveling. It will review traditional survey tools as well as electronic devices including total stations and global positioning systems. Also, students operate surveying equipment that is commonly used for coastal and marine applications.

 

Introduction to Surveying; Distance Measurements and Corrections; Leveling; Angles and Directions; Global Positioning; System (GPS); Electronic Distance Measurement Instruments (EDMs).

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

GEOG 1301 (Surveying & GPS)

 

This course is designed to enable students to develop an understanding of survey techniques. It will introduce students to measurement techniques associated with distance, direction and leveling. It will review traditional survey tools as well as electronic devices including total stations and global positioning systems. Also, students operate surveying equipment that is commonly used for coastal and marine applications.

 

Introduction to Surveying; Distance Measurements and Corrections; Leveling; Angles and Directions; Global Positioning System (GPS); Electronic Distance Measurement Instruments (EDMs).

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 18 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours twice per week = 24 total hours

 

GEOG 2100 (Geography)

 

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the types and uses of maps for use by marine environmental technologists. It also introduces students to calculations from maps and provides them with an introduction to digital mapping techniques, namely Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing.

 

Introduction to Map Use; Projections and Coordinates; Map Scale and Calculations; Spatial Analysis and GIS; Remote Sensing and Aerial Photography.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours /week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

GEOG 2101 (Intermediate Surveying Practices)

 

This course will expose the student to geodesy and map projection concepts and techniques as they are used in Hydrographic Surveying. In addition, there will be hands-on exercises in computing coordinates and calculating transformations between coordinate systems using proprietary software.

 

Geodesy; Satellite Positioning; Hydrographic Survey Reporting and Deliverables.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 1301 (Surveying and GPS)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

GEOG 2102 (Mapping & GIS)

 

This course introduces students to the application of maps within environmental problem-solving scenarios through computer-based applications such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and its applications.

 

Background to Digital Maps; Digital Mapping Data Models; Extraction and Application of Data from Maps; Geographic Information Systems; Recent Trends in Geographic Information Systems.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 1301 (Surveying and GPS) OR GEOG 2100 (Geography)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

GEOG 2103 (Introduction to Geographic Information Systems)

 

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical elements associated with Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students will have the opportunity to develop and demonstrate the comprehensive application of GIS technology through the performance of fundamental mapping and visualization tasks, GIS workflow editing, analytical processes and methods as well as basic geodata management best practices.

 

Digital Mapping and GIS Fundamentals; Geospatial Data Management; Geospatial Data Creation, Visualization and Sharing; Geospatial Data Editing and Manipulation; Geoprocessing, Automation and Data Analysis.

 

Prerequisites - OMAP 1302 (Ocean Mapping Field Camp I) or GEOG 2100 (Geography)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

GEOG 2104 (Introduction to Geodesy)

 

This course introduces students to the science of geodesy - the theoretical foundation of surveying and mapping. Students will study the dynamic behaviour of the Earth, precise positioning in a well-defined coordinate system, and the Earth’s gravity.

 

Importance of Geodesy; Earth and its Motions; Earth’s Gravity; Earth’s Size and Shape; Datum; Coordinate Systems; Map Projections

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

GEOG 2200 (Remote Sensing)

 

This course will provide an introduction to remote sensing technologies, examining the electro-magnetic spectrum, acoustic remote sensing, multi-spectral remote sensing, and image analysis. It will review the principles of data processing and the use of remote sensing in the coastal and marine environmental areas.

 

Introduction to Remote Sensing (RS); Electro-Magnetic (EM) Radiation; Multi-spectral Remote Sensing; Image Processing and Data Validation; Acoustic Remote Sensing in Water; Microwave and LiDAR Sensing.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 2102 (Mapping and GIS) or GEOG 2103 (Introduction to Geographic Information Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

GEOG 2201 (Intermediate Surveying Practices)

 

This course exposes the student to geodesy and map projection concepts and techniques as they are used in hydrographic surveying. The student will also gain practical experience in computing coordinates and calculating transformations between coordinate systems using proprietary software.

 

Techniques in Surveying; Positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS); Hydrographic Survey Reporting and Deliverables

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 2104 (Introduction to Geodesy)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

GEOG 3101 (Mapping & GIS)

 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the application of maps in environmental problems. Computer based applications such as Geographic Information Systems and their use are emphasized.

 

Background to Maps; Digital Mapping Data Models; Extraction and Application of Data from Maps; Geographic Information Systems; and Recent Trends in Geographic Information Systems.

Prerequisite - GEOG 1300 (Surveying and GPS) OR GEOG 2100 (Geography)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week = 39 total hours

 

GEOG 3102 (Geographic Database Design & Management)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the theoretical, technical, and practical application of geographic databases through the design, implementation, generation, dissemination and management of geospatial data in tabular format. The course will be taught using modern equipment and methodologies, allowing the student to better understand the benefits and limitations associated with the utilization, evaluation and optimization of geographic database design and management techniques and workflows.

 

Introduction to Databases; Introduction to Geodatabases; Database Management System Environments; Geographic Database Design; Database Design Tools; Database Models; Database Integration; Geodatabase Application Development; Geographic Database Management; Recent Trends in Geographic Database Design and Management.

 

Prerequisite - CPSK 1102 (Introduction to Applied Programming) and GEOG 2102 (Mapping and GIS) OR GEOG 3101 (Mapping and GIS)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 hours

 

GEOG 3103 (Advanced Remote Sensing)

 

This course provides the student with a background in advanced remote sensing practises in relation to operational satellite oceanography. The course will be taught using modern equipment and methodologies, allowing the student to better understand the uses of remote sensing in the extraction of oceanographic parameters. It will combine both theoretical and practical methods to reach the major objectives of both course and Program.

 

Multispectral Remote Sensing; Ocean Surface Phenomena; Atmospheric Properties and Radiative Transfer; The Atmosphere/Ocean Interface; Ocean Color; Sea Surface Temperature (SST); Microwave Remote Sensing; Introduction to Radars; Scatterometer Observations; The Altimeter; Imaging Radars.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 3200 (Remote Sensing)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratory - 2 hours/week = 26 hours

 

GEOG 3104 (Advanced Remote Sensing)

 

This course provides the student with a background in advanced remote sensing practises in relation to operational satellite oceanography. The course will be taught using modern equipment and methodologies, allowing the student to better understand the uses of remote sensing in the extraction of oceanographic parameters. It will combine both theoretical and practical methods to reach the major objectives of both course and Program.

 

Multispectral Remote Sensing; Bathymetric Remote Sensing; Photogrammetry; Ocean Surface Phenomena; Atmospheric Properties and Radiative Transfer; The Atmosphere/Ocean Interface; Ocean Colour; Sea Surface Temperature (SST); Microwave Remote Sensing; Introduction to Radars; Scatterometer Observations; The Altimeter; Imaging Radars.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 2200 (Remote Sensing)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

GEOG 3105 (Advanced Geospatial Data Management)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the theoretical, technical, and practical applications of advanced geographic database design, implementation, dissemination and management techniques and best practices. Taught using modern software and methods, it will enable the student to better understand the architecture of a geodatabase, the complex workflows associated with multi-user geodatabases within an enterprise environment as well as the spatial database administration from an installation, configuration, versioning, performance and replication perspective.

 

Introduction to Databases; Introduction to Geodatabases; Database Management System Environments; RDBMS Installation and Configuration; Geodatabase Design; Data Storage and Architecture; Data Loading, Transferring, Sharing and Editing; Geodatabase Maintenance, Performance and Troubleshooting

 

Prerequisites - CPSK 1102 (Introduction to Applied Programming); and GEOG 2103 (Introduction to Geographic Information Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 hours

 

GEOG 3200 (Remote Sensing)

 

This course will provide an introduction to remote sensing technologies, examining the electro-magnetic spectrum, acoustic remote sensing, multi-spectral remote sensing, and image analysis. It will review the principles of data processing and the use of remote sensing in the coastal and marine environmental areas.

 

Introduction to Remote Sensing (RS); Electro-Magnetic Radiation; Multi-spectral Remote Sensing; Acoustic Remote Sensing in Water; Image Processing and Data Validation.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 3101 (Mapping and GIS)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratory - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

GEOG 3201 (Advanced Surveying Practices)

 

This course will introduce the student to advanced survey methods and specialized hydrographic techniques. Building on knowledge of standard survey practices the student will learn the principles and practical applications of advanced GPS techniques, acoustic and alternative positioning methods, laser scanning and optical laser hydrographic surveys.

 

Review of Positioning Concepts; Advanced GPS Positioning Techniques; Review of Acoustic Principles; Acoustic Positioning Applications; Least Squares Adjustments; Alternative Positioning Methods; Future Positioning Methods.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 1301 (Surveying and GPS) or equivalent; OMAP 2000 (Underwater Acoustic Applications) or equivalent.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

GEOG 3202 (Web-based Mapping)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the theoretical, technical, and practical application of web-based mapping through the design, implementation, generation and dissemination of geospatial data on the World Wide Web. The course will be taught using modern equipment and methodologies, allowing the student to better understand the benefits and limitations associated with the utilization, evaluation and optimization of web-based mapping techniques and workflows.

 

Introduction to Web-based Mapping; Technical Aspects of Web-based Mapping; Web-based Mapping Development Environments; Web Programming; Geospatial Web Services; Geospatial Mashups; Mobile GIS; Geoportals; Spatial Data Infrastructure and the Web 2.0; Recent Trends in Web-based Mapping.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 3102 (Geographic Database Design and Management)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

GEOG 3203 (Marine GIS & Nautical Cartography)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the theoretical, technical and practical application of marine GIS and nautical cartography techniques from an ocean mapping perspective. These practices will focus on specific marine and nautical applications associated with marine data management and nautical charting symbology utilized in the formal production of a marine product. The course will employ modern equipment and methodologies, allowing the student to better understand the benefits and limitations associated with this technology, from system deployment and data acquisition to data processing, analysis and dissemination.

 

Marine GIS and Nautical Cartography; Fundamentals of Marine GIS; Fundamentals of Nautical Cartography; Applications in Industrial Engineering for Survey Chart Production; Applications and Future Trends in Marine GIS and Nautical Cartography.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 2102 (Mapping and GIS)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

GEOG 3204 (Web-Based Mapping & Application Development)

 

This course provides the student with an opportunity to apply and develop web-based mapping and application development techniques through the design, implementation and dissemination of geospatial data through the World Wide Web. Taught using modern software and methods, this course enables the student to effectively configure and deploy desktop applications, build web applications with object-oriented programming, and perform application documentation as well as conduct maintenance and implementation of client-side and server-side security from an enterprise administration perspective.

 

Introduction to Web-based Mapping; Web-based Mapping Development Environments; Web Programming; Application Development; System Design; System Administration.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 3105 (Advanced Geospatial Data Management)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

GEOG 3205 (Paper Chart Production)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the theoretical, technical and practical application, production and management of paper nautical charts from a hydrographic perspective. These practices will focus on specific marine and nautical applications associated with marine data management and nautical charting symbology utilized in the formal production of a marine product. Employing a variety of modern software and development methods, this course enables the student to better understand the benefits and limitations associated with this technology along with developing an in-depth understanding of how these marine products are utilized and implemented within an ocean mapping environment.

 

Introduction to Nautical Charts; Fundamentals of Nautical Cartography; Raster and Vector Charts; Paper Nautical Chart Production.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 2103 (Introduction to Geographic Information Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

GEOG 3401 (Nautical Chart Production)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the theoretical, technical and practical application of paper and electronic navigational chart production techniques and best practices. The course will be taught using high-level equipment and methodologies, allowing the student to better understand the benefits and limitations associated with this technology from a compilation, production, dissemination and management perspective.

 

Introduction to Nautical Charts; Fundamentals of Nautical Charts; Paper Nautical Chart Production; Electronic Navigational Chart Production; Nautical Chart Corrections; Nautical Chart Data Management; Future Trends in Nautical Chart Production.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 3102 (Geographic Database Design and Management)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week for 10 weeks (starting in week 2) = 30 total hours

 

GEOG 3402 (Nautical Chart Production)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the theoretical, technical and practical application of paper and electronic navigational chart production techniques and best practices. The course is delivered using high-level equipment and methodologies, allowing the student to better understand the benefits and limitations associated with this technology from a compilation, production, dissemination and management perspective.

 

Introduction to Nautical Charts; Fundamentals of Nautical Charts; Paper Nautical Chart Production; Electronic Navigational Chart Production; Nautical Chart Corrections; Nautical Chart Data Management; Future Trends in Nautical Chart Production.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 3102 (Geographic Database Design and Management)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week for 10 weeks (starting in week 2) = 20 total hours

 

GEOG 3403 (Electronic Navigational Chart Production)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the theoretical, technical and practical application, production and management of electronic navigational charts (ENCs) from a hydrographic perspective. These practices will focus on specific marine and nautical applications associated with marine data management and nautical chart creation utilized in the formal production of a marine product. Employing a variety of modern software and development methods, this course enables the student to develop a better understanding of the benefits and limitations associated with this technology along with an in-depth understanding of how these marine products are utilized and implemented within an ocean mapping environment.

 

Nautical Charts Fundamentals; Nautical Chart Ancillary Data and Nautical Publications; Electronic Navigational Charts; Electronic Navigational Chart Production; Application of Nautical Chart Production (Engineering Survey Chart Production).

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 2103 (Introduction to Geographic Information Systems)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

GEOG 4100 (Remote Sensing)

 

This course will provide an introduction to remote sensing technologies, examining data collection and processing methodologies. It will review the principles of data processing and the use of remote sensing in coastal zone and water quality problems.

 

Introduction to Remote Sensing (RS); Airborne Systems; Space Based Platforms; RADARs; Data Acquisition and Analysis; Underwater Acoustic Technologies; Applications.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week

 

GEOG 4103 (Aquatic Systems)

 

This course is an introductory course covering the fundamentals of hydrology, oceanography and limnology and will provide the student with an understanding of the processes and applications of each discipline.

 

Introduction to Water Resources; Runoff; Groundwater; Evaporation and Transpiration; Streamflow; Anthropogenic Case Studies.

 

Lectures - 39 hours (3 hours per week)

 

Laboratories - 26 hours (2 hour lab per week)

 

GEOG 4200 (Geographic Information Systems)

 

This course is designed to provide the participants with an introduction to general map use and application as well as outline of the opportunities and limitations of the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in the fields of Water Quality and Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management.

 

Background to Maps, Digital Mapping Data Models, Geographic Information System; Basic Functions of GIS; Data Quality Evaluation; Recent Trends in GIS.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Practical Exercises/Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

GEOG 4300 (Applied GIS & Remote Sensing)

 

This course is designed to provide the participants with hands on application of data collection and analysis of remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data in various projects directly related to integrated coastal and ocean management.

 

Coastal and Ocean Management Case Studies; Data Requirements of Problem Resolution; Flow Charting Existing Problems and Development of Applicable Work Flow Models.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 4100 (Remote Sensing); GEOG 4200 (Geographic Information Systems)

 

Duration - 5 weeks (20 hours)

 

Practical Exercises/Lab - 4 hours/week

 

GEOG 4301 (Applied GIS & Remote Sensing for Water Quality)

 

This course is designed to provide the participants with the hands-on application of data collection, processing, analysis and dissemination of remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data as it relates to current issues and trends in water quality and wastewater management.

 

Spatial and Temporal Patterns in Water Resources; Data Requirements for Problem Resolution; Practical Application in Resource Management.

 

Prerequisite - GEOG 4100 (Remote Sensing); GEOG 4200 (Geographic Information Systems)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - None

 

Laboratory - 4 hours/week (Two 2-hour labs/week)

 

GEOG 4302 (GIS & Remote Sensing for Integrated Coastal & Ocean Management)

 

This course is designed to provide the participants with the hands-on application of data collection, processing, analysis and dissemination of remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data as it relates to current issues and trends in integrated coastal and ocean management.

 

Spatial and Temporal Patterns in Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management; Data Requirements for Problem Resolution; Practical Application in Resource Management.

 

Prerequisite - Geography 4100 (Remote Sensing); Geography 4200 (Geographic Information Systems)

 

Duration - 5 weeks (20 hours)

 

Lectures - None

 

Laboratory - 4 hours/week (Two 2-hour labs/week)

 

MARP 0001(Fishing Vessel Hull Repair & Maintenance - Fibreglass)

 

This course is designed to provide harvesters with knowledge and basic skills in the proper maintenance of the hull of their vessels. It focuses on the use of fibreglass material for the repair and maintenance of the hull of fibreglass fishing vessels.

 

Hull Maintenance; What is Fibreglass?; The Fibreglass Process; Safety; Fibreglass Sheathing of Wooden Boats; Applying the Laminate; Fibreglass Boat Repairs; Modifications.

 

Pre-requisites - SFTY 1104 (WHMIS)

 

Duration - 1 Week (35 hrs)

 

MARP 0002 (General Fishing Vessel Maintenance)

 

This course is designed to give students basic knowledge and necessary skills to maintain their fishing vessel.

 

Vessel Lay-up; Deck Equipment Maintenance Procedures; Engine Room Maintenance; Wheelhouse, Galley, and Accommodations Maintenance; Outboard Motor and Battery Maintenance; Engine / Shaft Alignment; Basic Hydraulic Systems and Maintenance; General Maintenance for Fishing Methods; General Maintenance Log Book.

 

Pre-requisite - None

 

Duration - 2 weeks (10 days)

 

MATH 0102 (Mathematics)

 

This basic course is designed to help alleviate specific weaknesses in the student’s basic mathematical skills.

 

Whole Numbers and Decimal Numbers; Fractions; Scientific Notation; Percentage; Linear Equations and Formula Manipulations; SI Units and Imperial Units.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 one-hour classes/week

 

MATH 0103 (Mathematics)

 

This course is designed to ensure students have a solid foundation in basic mathematics and related concepts. Topics covered will assist students in better understanding concepts encountered in other courses.

 

Whole Numbers; Decimal Fractions; Common Fractions; Percentages; Angular Measurement; Introduction to SI Units; Perimeters; Areas; Volumes; Practical Applications.

 

Duration - 10 weeks (30 hours)

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MATH 0112 (Mathematics)

 

This is a course designed to ensure that students have a solid foundation in basic mathematics and related concepts. The topics covered will assist students to understand the technical material encountered in other courses.

 

Whole Numbers; Common Fractions; Decimal Fractions; Percents; Ratio and Proportion; Angle Measure.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2/0 hours per week

 

MATH 0200 (Mathematics)

 

This introductory course is designed to strengthen the student’s technical and mathematical skills and to enhance their problem solving ability; therefore, providing them with a solid foundation for a career as a marine mechanic.

 

Applied Linear Measure; Applied Area Measure; Applied Volume and Surface Area; Ratio and Proportion; and Shop Formulas.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 0102 (Mathematics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MATH 0201 (Mathematics II)

 

This course is designed to strengthen technical and mathematical skills and to enhance problem-solving ability, thereby providing students with a solid foundation for a career in offshore steel fabrication.

 

Linear Equations and Formula Manipulation; SI Units; Applied Linear Measure; Applied Angle Measure; Applied Volume and Surface Area Measure; Volume, Mass and Capacity Equivalencies; Bending Metals.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 0112 (Mathematics I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3/0 hours per week

 

MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus)

 

This is a course in pre-calculus mathematics designed to help alleviate specific weaknesses in students’ mathematical skills and thereby increase their chances for success in other technical courses.

 

Review of Fundamental Algebra; Trigonometry; Operations Involving Algebraic Expressions; Quadratic Equations; Exponents and Radicals; Logarithms; Systems of Linear Equations.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week for a total of 78 hours

 

MATH 1101 (Introduction to Calculus)

 

This is a course designed to prepare students for the study of calculus as well as to introduce them and give them a facility with the concepts of differentiation necessary for a better understanding of a variety of technology courses.

 

Functions; Analytic Geometry; Trigonometry; Algebraic Operations and Complex Numbers; The Derivative.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus) or Acceptable score on Mathematics Placement Test

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

OR

 

Duration - 8 weeks

 

Lectures - 8 hours/week for a total of 64 hours

 

MATH 1102 (Pre-Calculus)

 

This is a course in pre-calculus mathematics designed to improve students’ mathematical skills and thereby increase their chances for success in other technical courses.

 

Review of Fundamental Algebra; Trigonometric Functions; Operations Involving Algebraic Expressions; Operations Involving Fractional Algebraic Expressions; Exponents and Radicals; The Quadratic Formula; Logarithms; Systems of Linear Equations, Determinants and Matrices.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Class Hours - 6 hours/week

 

MATH 1103 (Introduction to Calculus)

 

This is a course designed to prepare students for the study of calculus and give them a facility with the concepts of differentiation and integration necessary for a better understanding of a variety of technology courses.

 

Functions; Algebraic Operations and Complex Numbers; Trigonometry; The Derivative; Introduction to Integration.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1102 (Pre-Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week

 

MATH 1105 (Introduction to Calculus)

 

This is a course designed to prepare students for the study of calculus as well as to introduce them and give them a facility with the concepts of differentiation necessary for a better understanding of a variety of technology courses.

 

Functions; Analytic Geometry; Trigonometry; Algebraic Operations and Complex Numbers; The Derivative.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus) or Acceptable score on Mathematics Placement Test

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

MATH 1112 (NASC Mathematics I)

 

This is a course in pre-calculus mathematics designed to help alleviate specific weaknesses in students’ fundamental mathematical skills and thereby increase their chances for success in the Nautical Science technology program.

 

Review of Fundamental Algebra; Trigonometry; Vectors; Operations Involving Algebraic Expressions; Quadratic Equations; Exponents and Radicals; Systems of Linear Equations; Analytical Geometry.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week for a total of 78 hours

 

MATH 1200 (Calculus)

 

In this course students will study topics in differential calculus and will also be introduced to integral calculus. Topics covered will assist students to better understand concepts encountered in other courses.

 

Curve Sketching; Transcendental Functions and Their Derivatives; Applications of the Derivative; Differentials; Introduction to Integration; The Definite Integral; Further Applications of Indefinite and Definite Integrals.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1101 (Introduction to Calculus) or MATH 1105 (Introduction to Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

OR

 

Duration - 8 weeks

 

Lectures - 8 hours/week for a total of 64 hours

 

MATH 1201 (Calculus)

 

In this course students will study topics in differential calculus and will also be introduced to integral calculus. Topics covered will assist students to better understand concepts encountered in other courses.

 

Curve Sketching; Transcendental Functions and Their Derivatives; Applications of the Derivative; Differentials; Introduction to Integration; The Definite Integral; Further Applications of Indefinite and Definite Integrals.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1101 (Introduction to Calculus) with a mark >=60%; or MATH 1105 (Introduction to Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

MATH 1212 (NASC Mathematics)

 

This is a course comprised of a variety of topics designed to meet specific needs of the Nautical Science Diploma Program.

 

Mensuration; Ratio, Proportion, and Linear Interpolation; Geometry; Analytic Geometry; Moments and Centre of Gravity; Simpson’s Rules; Trigonometric Graphs and Identities; Spherical Trigonometry; Statistics.

 

Prerequisite - Successful completion of MATH 1100, MATH 1111 or MATH 1112 (NASC Mathematics I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week for a total of 78 hours

 

MATH 2101 (Advanced Calculus)

 

This is primarily an applied calculus course designed to meet the specific requirements of various technology and degree programs.

 

Integration Techniques; Applications of Integration; Double Integration; Differential Equations.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1200 (Calculus) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

MATH 2102 (Mathematics)

 

This is a course comprised of a variety of topics designed to meet specific needs of the Nautical Science Diploma program.

 

Formula Manipulation; Mensuration; Geometric Construction; Interpolation; Moments; Trapezoidal Rule; Simpson’s Rule; Spherical Trigonometry.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MATH 2203 (Linear Algebra)

 

This is an introductory linear algebra course covering basic concepts including matrices, determinants, Euclidean and general vector spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

 

Systems of Linear Equations and Matrices; Determinants; Euclidean Vector Spaces; General Vector Spaces; Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors.

 

Co-requisite - Math 1200 (Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

MATH 2204 (Spherical Trigonometry)

 

This is a course in pre-calculus mathematics comprised of topics of spherical trigonometry which relate to navigation.

 

Terminology and Properties of Spherical Triangles; Oblique Spherical Triangles; Great Circle Sailing; Right Spherical Triangles and Quadrantal Spherical Triangles.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus) or equivalent

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Class Hours - 4 hours per week = 24 total hours

 

MECH 1100 (Mechanics)

 

This course provides the fundamental concepts required for the analysis of basic engineering problems and builds on the principles introduced in previous physics courses. Students are introduced to elements of statics and dynamics appropriate for a first course for technicians studying marine engineering.

 

Analysis of Force Systems; Principal of Moments; Equilibrium; Analysis of Trusses and Machines; Friction; Centroids, Moments of Area, and Moments of Inertia; Kinematics of Rigid Bodies; Plane Motion; Kinetics of Rigid Bodies; Work, Power, and Energy; and Simple Machines.

 

Prerequisites - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus) or MATH 1102; PHYS 1100 (Physics) or PHYS 1101 (Physics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

Labs - 2 hours/week every second week for 6 labs = 12 hours

 

MECH 1101 (Mechanics)

 

This course provides the fundamental concepts required for the analysis of basic engineering problems and builds on the principles introduced in previous physics courses. Students are introduced to elements of statics and dynamics appropriate for a first course for electro-mechanical technicians.

 

(Statics) - Analysis of Force Systems; Principal of Moments; Equilibrium; Friction; (Dynamics) - Kinematics of Rigid Bodies; Plane Motion; Kinetics of Rigid Bodies; Work, Power, and Energy; Simple Machines.

 

Prerequisites - MATH 1102 (Pre-Calculus) or MATH 1101 (Introduction to Calculus); PHYS 1100 (Physics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/2 week period

 

MECH 2100 (Machine Design)

 

This course is an introduction to the primary considerations in the design of machines as they relate to each other, to their operators and to the environment. Machines will be seen as converters of energy and as the extension of human power.

 

The composition and characteristics of machines will be presented and the underlying principles of mechanics of machines and strength of materials demonstrated, thus enabling the student to design machinery supplemented by practical manufacturing exposure and experience.

 

Nature and Composition of Machines; The Many Aspects of Machine Design; Design for Strength; Belt Drives and Band Brakes; Friction Clutches; Gear Trains; Cam Design; Detachable Fasteners; Springs.

 

Prerequisites - MECH 1101 (Mechanics) or MECH 1100 (Mechanics); MTPR 2101 (Strength of Materials)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

MECH 2102 (Mechanics)

 

This is a foundation course that provides the fundamental concepts required for the understanding and development of basic engineering sciences, and builds on the principles developed in Physics 1100. This first course in mechanics concentrates on the all important concepts of statics.

 

Statics of Particles, Force Systems and Their Equivalents; Statics of Rigid Bodies; Rigid Bodies in Space; Centroids and Centres of Gravity; Analysis of Frames and Machines; Friction; Second Moments of Area and Moments of Inertia.

 

Prerequisite - PHYS 1100 (Physics); MATH 1100 (Mathematics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

MECH 2110 (Mechanics)

 

This is a foundation course that provides the fundamental concepts required for the understanding and development of basic engineering sciences, and builds on the principles developed in PHYS 1100 (Physics). This first course in mechanics concentrates on the all important concepts of statics.

 

Statics of Particles, Force Systems and Their Equivalents; Statics of Rigid Bodies; Rigid Bodies in Space; Centroids and Centres of Gravity; Analysis of Frames and Machines; Friction; Second Moments of Area and Moments of Inertia.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus); PHYS 1100 (Physics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 13 hours

 

MECH 2111 (Statics & Dynamics)

 

This course provides the fundamental concepts required for the analysis of basic engineering problems and builds on the principles introduced in previous physics courses. Students are introduced to elements of statics and dynamics appropriate for a first course for technicians studying marine engineering.

 

Analysis of Force Systems; Principle of Moments; Equilibrium; Friction; Centroids, Moments of Area, and Moments of Inertia; Kinematics of Rigid Bodies; Plane Motion; Kinetics of Rigid Bodies; Work, Power, and Energy.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1105 (Introduction to Calculus); PHYS 1103 (Physics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week every second week for a total of 6 labs = 12 hours

 

MECH 2201 (Mechanics)

 

This second course in mechanics introduces the fundamental concepts of dynamics and builds on the basic principles of statics presented in Mechanics 2102. The two course sequence is a basic requirement for the analysis of engineering problems, and for understanding the design principles of various machines and mechanisms.

 

Dynamics of Particles; Dynamics of Rigid Bodies; Mechanical Vibrations.

 

Prerequisite for students prior to September 2004 - MECH 2102

 

Prerequisite for students as of September 2004 - MECH 2110

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 6 experiments

 

MECH 2207 (Theory of Machines)

 

This course develops and expands the principles and theories of basic engineering mechanics and looks at the application of these principles to specific machine elements.

 

Velocity and Acceleration Diagrams; Balancing of Rotating Masses; Gear Trains; Vibrations; Special Topics in Machines.

 

Prerequisite - MECH 2111 (Statics and Dynamics); MTPR 1300 (Materials and Processes); MATH 1201 (Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week every second week for a total of 6 labs = 12 hours

 

Total - 51 hours

 

MECH 3100 (Theory of Machines)

 

This course develops and expands the principles and theories of basic engineering mechanics which are necessary for the design and understanding of various common mechanisms for standard mechanical engineering applications.

 

Velocity and Acceleration Diagrams; Crank and Effort Diagrams and Flywheel Design; Governors; Balancing of Rotating Masses; Gyroscopes; Belt Drives and Band Brakes; Friction Clutches; Gear Trains; Cam Design; Transverse Vibration of Beams; Whirling of Shafts.

 

Prerequisite for students prior to September 2004 - MECH 2201 (Mechanics)

 

Co-requisite for students prior to September 2004 - MATH 2101 (Mathematics)

 

Prerequisite for students as of September 2004 - MECH 2201 (Mechanics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 6 experiments

 

MENV 1100 (Sampling I)

 

This course will provide students with basic sampling skills to conduct oceanographic and intertidal sampling programs. Students will conduct practical laboratory and field exercises designed to complement the theoretical course content.

 

Importance of Ocean and Coastal Processes; Skill Sets of Marine Researchers; Introduction to Sampling ; Physical Oceanography; Chemical Oceanography; Biological Sampling.

 

Duration - 5 days (35 hours)

 

MENV 1101 (Industry Visitation)

 

This course will provide an overview of the environmental industry on a local, national, and global scale. Academic and professional standards will be discussed for the environmental sector and local visitation to industry will occur.

 

Production Industries; Service Industries; Environmental Regulations; Professional Associations; Industry Visitation.

 

Duration - 35 hours

 

MENV 2100 (Marine Environment)

 

This is an introductory course to environmental science and some of the major environmental issues. Emphasis is placed on causes and effects of marine pollutants.

 

Environmental Citizenship; Major Environmental Issues; Ocean Users and Uses; Marine Pollution; and Case Studies.

 

Prerequisite - CHEM 1100 (Chemistry) or CHEM 1101 (General Chemistry I)

 

Co-requisite - BIOL 1100 (Biology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 39 hours (3 hours/week)

 

MENV 2101 (Dynamics of Marine Pollution)

 

This is an introductory course of the mechanisms involved in the movement of pollutants in the marine environment. This includes oil and chemical spills and also the spread of pollution from land based sources.

 

Properties; Priority Pollutants; Spill Behaviour in the Marine Environment; Environmental Factors; Introduction to Pollution Response; Effluent Plume Dispersion; Limnology; Open Channel Flow; Offshore Exploration and Production (Oil and Gas).

 

Prerequisite - CHEM 1100 (Chemistry) or CHEM 1101 (General Chemistry I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MENV 2102 (Marine Sampling)

 

This course will provide the students with the practical skills necessary to plan and conduct a basic marine sampling program. The course is one week in duration and will be delivered through a series of laboratories and practical exercises. Students will spend 1.5 days going through sampling procedures at sea, 1.5 days performing biological analysis of specimens and two days looking at cruise planning and equipment care and maintenance. Students will document all field work in a journal which will be submitted for evaluation.

 

Introduction to Marine Sampling; Basic Sampling Tools; Cruise Planning; Oceanographic Sampling; Environmental Observations; and Biological Sampling.

 

Prerequisites - BIOL 1100 (Biology); CHEM 1200 (Chemistry) or CHEM 1201 (General Chemistry I)

 

Duration - 5 days

 

MENV 2103 (BASIC OIL SPILL RESPONDER)

 

This is an entry-level course that will provide participants with basic knowledge and skills in oil spill response.

 

Canada Shipping Act: Marine Oil Spill Response Capability; Basic Properties of Petroleum & its Hazards; Personal, Site & Equipment Safety; Oil Spill Containment and Protection Techniques; Introduction to Spill Behavior; Introduction to Spill Assessment; Sampling; Recovery Techniques & Systems; Sorbents; Transfer, Storage & Disposal; Shoreline Cleanup Techniques; Oiled Wildlife Recovery & Treatment; Public Relations.

 

Duration - 35 hours

 

Theory - 20 hours

 

Practical - 15 hours

 

MENV 2300 (Environmental Applications of Industrial Hygiene)

 

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the principles and techniques involved in industrial hygiene practices.

 

Defining Industrial Hygiene; Indoor Environmental Investigation; Ventilation; Defining Workplace Hazards; Source Control; Defining Workplace Ambiance; Legislative Authorities Controls; Investigating Workplace Complaints.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours per week = 26 total hours

 

MENV 2301 (Fisheries Conservation Technologies)

 

An introduction to global marine fisheries, fisheries management and conservation measures in fisheries.

 

Global Fisheries; Managing Fisheries; Domestic Regulatory Framework; Fisheries Impacts; Fisheries Conservation.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

MENV 2303 (Marine Sampling)

 

This course will provide students with the practical skills necessary to plan and conduct a basic marine sampling program. The course is delivered through a series of laboratories and practical exercises that include going through sampling procedures at sea, performing biological analysis of specimens and looking at cruise planning and equipment care and maintenance.

 

Introduction to Marine Sampling; Basic Sampling Tools; Cruise Planning; Oceanographic Sampling; Environmental Observations; Biological Sampling (Plankton)

 

Prerequisites - BIOL 1100 (Biology); CHEM 1200 (Chemistry) or CHEM 1201 (General Chemistry II)

 

Duration - 10 days (70 hours)

 

MENV 3101 (Marine Environmental Seminar)

 

This course will present selected topics of relevance to the marine environment as well as land based pollution sources. The format will consist of presentations by faculty and invited speakers.

 

Air Pollution; Solid Waste Management; Pollution Control; Marine Protected Areas; Pollution Cleanup Technology; Environmental Policy; Environmental Biology; Environmental Assessment and Audit; and Bioremediation.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MENV 3102 (Fundamentals of Coastal Zone Management)

 

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the multidisciplinary nature of the elements involved in Coastal Zone Management and the complexity of their interactions. It will also provide an overall review of the program rational, particularly the three phases: description, analysis and synthesis that constitute the basis for the Coastal Zone Management Program.

 

Land/Ocean/Atmosphere Interface; Coastal Ecosystems; Production Economy; Social Ecology; Coastal Technologies; Environmental Hazards; Multiple User Conflicts; Legal Issues; and Integrated Coastal Zone Management.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MENV 4100 (Introduction to Coastal Zone Management)

 

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the multidisciplinary nature of the elements involved in CZM and the complexity of their interactions. It will also provide an overview of the program rational, particularly the three phases: description, analysis and synthesis that constitute the basis for CZM.

 

Introduction to the Coastal Zone; The Coastal Systems; Coastal Zone Protection; Development in Coastal Zone; Environmental Hazards; Multiple User Conflict; Integrated Coastal Zone Management; Conceptual Framework for Integrated Coastal Zone Management; Coastal Zone Management Programs.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MENV 4103 (Human Ecology)

 

This course provides the conceptual backgrounds on social aspects that will be utilized in the foregoing Conflict Resolution Skills course. It is designed for coastal zone managers involved with problems related to present development issues of coastal communities.

 

The course will review the historical background of human settlement in the coastal zones and the influence of the marine environment and the ocean in the social structure of coastal communities. It will also examine and discuss the impact of human activities in the use and further deterioration of the coastal environment.

 

Historical Review of the Human Colonization of the Coastal Zones; The Influence of Industrial Society on Coastal Zone; Present and Future uses of the Coastal Zones; The Role of Coastal Communities in the Management of the Coastal Zone.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MENV 4105 (Coastal Resources)

 

This course will introduce participants to the concept of Coastal Ecosystem, Natural Resource, Ecological balance and Ecosystem dynamics. It describes the various types of coastal ecosystems and its main components. The main objective will be to provide participants with a multi-sectoral perspective of the different types of resources available in the coastal zones.

 

Basic Ecological Principles; Classification of Marine Environments; Adaptive Strategies of Intertidal Organisms; Diversity of the Intertidal Zone; Concept of Marine Resources; Living Resources; Mineral and Energetic Resources; Coastal Space as Resource; Resource Valuation and Decision Making.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MENV 4106 (Human Ecology)

 

This course provides the conceptual background on social aspects that will be utilized in the Conflict Resolution and Resource Management courses. It is designed for coastal managers who are involved in community resource development. The course will provide an overview of human interactions from the individual, the family and the community. Historic and cultural resource exploitation in the coastal area is examined.

 

The Individual; Group Dynamics; Societal Structures; Institutions and Governance; Ethics and Culture; Managing Coastal Areas.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 39 hours (3 hours/week)

 

MENV 4107 (Introduction to Integrated Coastal & Ocean Management)

 

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the multidisciplinary nature of the elements involved in Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management (ICOM) and the complexity of their interactions. It will also provide an overview of the program rationale, particularly the three phases: description, analysis and synthesis, which constitute the basis for ICOM.

 

Introduction to the Coastal Zone; The Basic Principles of Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management; The Global Growth and Evolution of Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management; Development in the Coastal Zone; Conceptual Framework for Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management; Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management and Planning Methods; Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management Programs.

 

Duration - 39 hours

 

Lecture - 3 hours per week

 

MENV 4200 (Environmental Management)

 

This course will elaborate on the conceptual elements described in the basic course Coastal Resources and Coastal Resource Management to provide the participants with an overall view of the methods used to assess the status of the coastal environment and the impact of Man activities on the natural environment. It will also review examples of environmental legislation and protective measures.

 

Environmental Carrying Capacity; Environmental Impact Assessment; UNCED- Agenda 21 Framework; Contemporary Acknowledge and Trends in Environmental Quality; Effectiveness and Adequacy of Environmental Protection Measures; The Role of GESAMP.

 

Prerequisites - MENV 4105 (Coastal Resources)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MENV 4201 (Coastal Resource Management)

 

This is an intermediate level course designed to introduce participants to the conceptual elements involved in Resource Management. The course discusses the types of resources available in the CZ, the different levels of management, private and public use of resources and difficulties involved in establishing management policies in a multi-sectoral environment. It will also review the methodology for resource surveys and assessment, resource value and management options through review of practical examples.

 

Type of Coastal Resources; Elements of Coastal Resources Management; Historical Overview of Managing Coastal Resources; Protecting the Coastal Environment; Development and Coastal Resources Management; Legal Aspect of Managing Coastal Resources; Interdisciplinary Tools for Resolving Coastal Conflicts; Managing Coastal Resources.

 

Prerequisites - ONGR 4101 (Coastal Oceanography and Geomorphology); MENV 4105 (Coastal Resources)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MENV 4202 (Coastal Resources Management)

 

This intermediate level course is designed to provide students with the conceptual elements of resource management of coastal resources. The course discusses the tenets of sustainability and the human impact on the environmental through use and extraction. Stakeholder concerns and management approaches are examined through case studies of management approaches and plans.

 

Defining Coastal Areas; Coastal Management Use and Issues; Sustainability Tenets; Concepts of Coastal Planning and Management; Management Fundamentals; Technical Issues; Interdisciplinary Tools for Resolving Coastal Conflicts; Case Studies.

 

Prerequisites - MENV 4105 (Coastal Resources)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

MENV 4203 (Marine Ecotourism)

 

This course is designed to give students an overview of the demand for coastal ecotourism products, the implications of this demand on the marine environment and the effects on coastal communities.

 

The Tourism Industry; Ethics and Sustainability; Ecotourism Development; Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) and Strategic Planning.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

MENV 4301 (Ocean Research Technology)

 

This course will provide an overview of some of the technologies currently being employed in the field of ocean research by the Centre of Sustainable Aquatic Resources (C-SAR) at the Marine Institute. Researchers will discuss how these technologies can be employed in relation to course material covered in the Advanced Diploma in Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management Program.

Research Technologies at C-SAR; Industry Needs and Research Technology Development; Current Topics in Ocean Research.

 

Prerequisites - Successful completion of Term 1 and Term 2

 

TERM 1 - BSMG 4109 (Coastal Economics); GEOG 4100 (Remote Sensing); MENV 4105 (Coastal Resources); MENV 4106 (Human Ecology); MENV 4107 (Introduction to Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management); ONGR 4104 (Coastal Oceanography and Climatology)

 

TERM 2 - BSMG 4106 (Legal Aspects of Coastal Zone Management); BSMG 4107 (Conflict Resolution Skills); GEOG 4101 (Geographic Information Systems); MENV 4200 (Environmental Management); MENV 4202 (Coastal Resources Management); STAT 4102 (Statistics for Coastal Zone Management)

 

Duration - 1 week

 

MENV 4302 (Fisheries Management & Development)

 

This course will provide students with general knowledge of fishing methods and harvesting techniques. It has been developed to enhance students’ understanding of the impact that fishing has on both the resource and the ocean environment and help them gain insight into future trends in fisheries management and development.

 

Introduction and Harvesting Overview; Fishing Methods; Fish Biology and Behaviour; Fishing Gear Technology; Scientific Methodology and Harvesting; Allocations and Regulations; Future Trends.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MENV 4303 (Current Topics in Ocean Research Technology)

 

This course will provide an overview of a variety of technologies currently being employed in the field of ocean research.

 

Flume Tank Applications; Current Research in Sustainable Fisheries Technologies; Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs); Trawl Monitoring Systems; Acoustic Research Applications.

 

Prerequisite - Successful completion of Terms 1 and 2

 

Duration - 1 week

 

MIPG 4103 (Technical Problem Solving)

 

The course is designed to provide participants with various creative problem-solving techniques that are used to analyze and solve technical problems that occur in industry. It fosters both the use of creativity and technical knowledge to increase an individual’s problem solving skills.

 

Problem Solving and People; Problem Definition; Generating Ideas and Solutions; Decision Making; Implementation; Evaluation; Crisis Management and Crisis Leadership.

 

Schedule - Web-based instruction (39 hrs total)

 

MIPG 4104 (Quality Assurance in the Food Industry)

 

This course is designed to provide participants with an understanding of the various elements necessary in the design and implementation of a quality assurance program for the food industry.

 

Quality and the Food Industry; Quality Assurance Program; Specifications; Raw Material/Ingredient Supplier Certification; Process Control; Product Quality Audits; Third-party Audit Standards and Certification; Quality Assurance Documentation System.

 

Schedule - Web-based instruction 39 hours (3 hours per week)

 

MIPG 4113 (Introduction to Food Safety)

 

This course will introduce students to the fundamental control measures required to produce safe food as well as an overview of food safety regulation, food microbiology, food toxicology and an introduction to the safety of genetically modified foods.

 

Fundamentals of Food Safety; Food Microbiology and Food Safety; Food Toxicology and Food Safety; Genetically Engineered Foods and Food Safety.

 

Prerequisites - None

 

Schedule - Web-based Instruction: 39 hours

 

MIPG 4114 (Fundamentals of Canadian Food Laws and Regulations)

 

This course is designed to introduce the major topics in Canadian food laws and regulations that are fundamental in the manufacturing and trade of safe and compliant food commodities. While Canadian food laws and regulations are the primary focus of this course, some international food laws and regulations will also be introduced.

 

Introduction to Canadian Legal System; Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Federal Food Acts and Regulations; Additional Federal Departments and Agencies; Provincial Food Laws and Regulations; International Food Laws and Regulations; Genetically Engineered (GE) Food.

 

Schedule - Web-based instruction (39 hrs total)

 

MIPG 4115 (Foodborne Illness and Food Toxicology)

 

This course is designed to enable the student to gain knowledge of the biological and chemical hazards present in foods and their effect on human health.

 

Principles of Food Toxicology; Biotransformations; Chemical Carcinogenesis; Natural Toxicants in Animal Foodstuffs; Toxic Photochemicals; Environmental Toxicants; Animal Drug Residues; Food Additives; Toxicants formed during Food Processing; Important facts of Foodborne Diseases; Foodborne Intoxications; Foodborne Infections; Foodborne Toxicoinfections; Parasites and Algal Toxins; Food Insensitivities.

 

Schedule - Web-based instruction (39 hrs total)

 

MIPG 4116 (Food Hygiene and Food Safety)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of food sanitation and to provide students the necessary tools to design, and implement an effective sanitation program.

Introduction; Regulations and Buyer Drive Program Affecting Food Sanitation; Microbiology; The Control of Microorganisms; Cleaning and Sanitization Practices; Pest Control; Industry Specific Sanitation Considerations; Elements of an Effective Sanitation Program; Facility Design, Maintenance and Construction.

 

Prerequisites - None

 

Schedule - Web-based Instruction: 39 hours

 

MREK 0100 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This introductory course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skill to gain employment in a marine related/mechanically oriented field, and through continued studies, to obtain a marine engineer’s certificate.

 

Safety; Introduction to Basic Hand Tools; Introduction to Combustion Engines (Gasoline); Engine Systems; Introduction to Diesel Engines; Diesel Engine Fuel Injection Systems; Governors; and Supercharging.

 

Duration - 16 weeks

 

Lectures - 12 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 10 hours/week

 

MREK 0101 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This introductory course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skill to gain employment in a marine related/mechanically oriented field, and through continued studies, to obtain a marine engineer’s certificate.

 

Safety; Introduction to Combustion Engines; Engine Systems; Diesel Engine Fuel Supply, Fuel Injection and Governing Systems; Vessel Applications

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 10 hours/week = 130 hours

 

Labs - 6 hours/week = 78 hours

 

MREK 0200 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This advanced course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to gain employment in a marine related/mechanically oriented field, and through continued studies, to obtain a marine engineer’s certificate.

 

Marine Diesel Engine Systems; Pumps and Pumping Systems; Boilers; Air Compressors; Purifiers; Bilge, Ballast Systems and Oil Pollution; Shafting, Propellers and Propulsion; Alignment; Steering Gear; Hydraulics; Refrigeration; Watchkeeping.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 0101 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 8 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 6 hours/week

 

MREK 0201 (Ship Stability and Construction)

 

This introductory course will provide students with a basic knowledge with the principles of ship stability and construction.

 

Ship Stability; Ship Construction

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hrs/week

 

MREK 1101 (Marine Engineering Knowledge I)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the design, operation, and application of marine diesel engines.

 

Marine Diesel Engine Terminology; Diesel Engine Stationary Parts; Diesel Engine Moving Parts; Lubrication; Fuel Systems; Cooling Systems; Starting Systems; Charge Air and Exhaust Systems; Marine Propulsion Plants.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

MREK 1201 (Marine Engineering Knowledge II)

 

This second course in Marine Engineering knowledge is designed to provide the student with knowledge of ship auxiliary equipment and shipboard systems.

 

Pumps and Pumping Systems; Ballast Systems; Seawater Cooling Systems; Fuel Handling System; Bilge Water Handling System; Compressed Air System; Steering Gear; Steam Boilers and Steam Plant.

 

Prerequisites - MREK 1101 (Marine Engineering Knowledge I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

MREK 2101 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This is an introductory course designed to give students in the Naval Architecture program knowledge of marine engineering systems and their components.

 

Fasteners; Piping Material, Specifications, Connections and Hangers; Valves and Cocks; Fuels and Properties; Pumps; Compressors; Bilge System; Ballast System; Fuel Oil System; Seawater Systems; Freshwater System; Compressed Air System. Lubricating Oil System.

 

Prerequisites - CHEM 1100 (Chemistry)

 

Co-requisites - NARC 1104 (Steel Ship Structure); MECH 2102 (Mechanics); MATH 1101(Introduction to Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories/Projects - 2 hours/week every other week = 12 hours total

 

MREK 2102 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This is a marine engineering course designed to give the students knowledge and understanding of the basic operational principles of ships’ machinery.

 

Fuels; Instrumentation and Controls; Valves; Pumps and Pumping Stations; Steam Boilers.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 1204 (Seamanship II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MREK 2103 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

The course is designed to give students in Marine Engineering a working knowledge of internal combustion engines which can be applied to their operation and maintenance.

 

Fuels; Power Plants; Diesel Engine Classification and Stationary Parts; Diesel Engine Moving Parts; Tribology and Engine Lubricating; Engine Power and Fuel Consumption; Intake and Exhaust Systems; Fuel Burning Systems; Cooling Systems; Governing.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

MREK 2107 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This is the first course in marine engineering knowledge designed to give the student an understanding of marine terminology, propulsion equipment, shipboard systems, marine pollution and an engineer’s duties.

 

Marine Living; Marine Terminology; Main Propulsion Machinery (Diesel Engines); Marine Auxiliary Machinery; Steam Boilers and Steam Plants; Power Plants; Bilge, Ballast Systems, and Oil Pollution; Engineer’s Duties.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week

 

MREK 2110 (Marine Engineering Knowledge I)

 

This is the first course in marine engineering knowledge, designed to prepare students for their first workterm by providing knowledge of propulsion equipment and shipboard systems.

 

Marine Diesel Engines; Steam Boilers and Steam Plants; Marine Propulsion Plants.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

MREK 2111 (Marine Engineering Knowledge III)

 

This is the third of seven courses in marine engineering knowledge. It is designed to provide the student with knowledge of ship auxiliary equipment and shipboard systems.

 

 

Heat Exchangers; Freshwater Systems, Evaporators and Reverse Osmosis; Sewage Systems and Incinerators; Deck Machinery; Fire Prevention Systems, Regulations, and Safety; Watertight Doors; Propulsion Systems; Vibration.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 1201 (Marine Engineering Knowledge II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 13 hours total

 

MREK 2112 (Marine Engineeing Knowledge I)

 

This marine engineering course is designed to give students knowledge and understanding of the basic operational principles of ship machinery.

 

Fuels; Instrumentation and Controls; Valves; Pumps and Pumping Systems; Sewage Treatment Plants; Steam Boilers; Fresh Water Production; Materials and Corrosion Prevention.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 1204 (Seamanship II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

MREK 2201 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

The course is designed to give Naval Architecture students more knowledge of Marine Engineering Systems and basic knowledge of Power Plant components.

 

Shafting Arrangements; Steam Generation and Systems; Bilge System; Ballast System; Engine Room Ventilation; Fire Fighting Systems; Domestic Sanitary Systems; Steering Gear.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2101 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lecture - 6 hours/week = 30 hours total

 

Laboratory - 4 hours/week = 20 hours total

 

MREK 2202 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This is a marine engineering course designed to give the student’s knowledge and understanding of the basic operational principles of ship’s machinery.

 

Internal Combustion Engines; Steam Turbines; Propulsion Systems; Steering Gears; Tank Level and Draft Measurement; and Deck Machinery Layout.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2102 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MREK 2203 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This course is designed to give Marine Engineering students a knowledge of auxiliary systems and equipment that can be applied to their operation and maintenance.

 

Steam Boilers and Steam Plants; Pumps; Air Compressors and Systems; Coolers and Cooling Systems; Windlass; Bilge, Ballast Systems and Oil Pollution; Sewage Plant and Pollution; Steering Gears; and Fuel Oil Pretreatment and Burning Systems.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2103 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

MREK 2207 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This course is designed for the marine engineering student who has complete the first work term. This course will provide the student with the concepts of internal combustion engines and associated subsystems. It is offered using the Propulsion Plant Simulator (PPS) and Diesel/Fitting Shops for the application of theory as well as providing the student with the requirements for the Level 1 PPS course.

 

Diesel Engine Cooling Water Systems; Diesel Engine Liner and Jacket Water-cooled Systems; Piston and Piston Cooling; Intake and Exhaust Systems; Air Compressors and Systems; Diesel Engine Starting Systems; Diesel Engine Lubrication, Crankcase Explosions, and Scavenge Fires; Pumps; Fuels; Fuel Burning Systems; Waste Heat Recovery Systems; Fresh Water Generation and Treatment.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2107 (Marine Engineering); WKTM 1103 (Work Term 1- Marine Engineering)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 8 hours/week

 

MREK 2208 (Marine Engineering Knowledge II)

 

This is the second course in marine engineering knowledge designed to prepare students for their first workterm by providing knowledge of ship auxiliary equipment and shipboard systems.

 

Marine Auxiliary Equipment; Bilge, Ballast and Fuel Handling Systems.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2110 (Marine Engineering Knowledge I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

MREK 2209 (Marine Engineering Knowledge IV)

 

This course will provide the student with an in-depth understanding of internal combustion engine concepts and associated systems.

 

Diesel Engine Cooling Water Systems; Diesel Engine Liner and Jacket Water-cooled Systems; Piston and Piston Cooling; Intake and Exhaust Systems; Diesel Engine Starting Systems; Diesel Engine Lubrication, Crankcase Explosions, and Scavenge Fires; Fuels; Governors; Diesel Plant Control.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2111 (Marine Engineering Knowledge III)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

MREK 2212 (Marine Engineering Knowledge II)

 

This marine engineering course is designed to give students knowledge and understanding of the basic operational principles of ship’s machinery.

 

Internal Combustion Engines; Steam Turbines; Gas Turbines; Propulsion Systems; Steering Gears and Stabilizers; Hydraulic Systems; Deck Machinery; Shipboard Electrical Production and Distribution.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2112 (Marine Engineering Knowledge I); ELTK 1203 (Basic Electrical Technology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

MREK 3102 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This is a marine engineering course designed to give students a knowledge and understanding of the basic operational principles of ship’s machinery.

 

Cargo Piping and Pumps; Refrigeration; Vibration; Venturi Systems; Engine Power, Propeller Pitch, and Power.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2202 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

MREK 3103 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This course is designed to give the student the knowledge of design considerations for internal combustion engines suitable for marine applications whereby the student will be able to diagnose machinery problems.

 

Fuel Treatment; Valve Timing and Gas Exchange Processes; Fuel Injection Systems; Diesel Engine Liner and Jacket Water-Cooled Systems; Piston and Piston Cooling Systems; Diesel Engine Lubrication, Crankcase Explosions, and Scavenge Fires; Diesel Engine Starting Systems; Bearing Design; Reduction Gears and Couplings; Intermediate Shafting and Thrust Block.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2203 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

MREK 3104 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This course is designed to develop students’ ability to understand an internal combustion engine’s fuel/governing system and to determine power developed. It will also lead students in a study of reduction gearing, main shafting, controllable pitch propellers and steering gears.

 

Fuel Treatment; Valve Timing and Gas Exchange Process; Fuel Injection Systems; Engine Power and Fuel Consumption; Governors; Bearing Design; Reduction Gears and Couplings; Intermediate Shafting and Thrust Block; Stern Tubes and CP Propellers; Steering Gears.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2207 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

MREK 3106 (Marine Engineering Knowledge III)

 

This course will provide the student with more in-depth understanding of internal combustion engine concepts and associated systems.

 

Diesel Engine Cooling Water Systems; Diesel Engine Liner and Jacket Water-cooled Systems; Piston and Piston Cooling; Intake and Exhaust Systems; Air Compressors and Systems; Diesel Engine Starting Systems; Diesel Engine Lubrication, Crankcase Explosions, and Scavenge Fires; Fuels; Fuel Handling & Storage; Fuel Burning Systems; Governors.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2208 (Marine Engineering Knowledge II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

MREK 3107 (Marine Engineering Knowledge V)

 

This course is designed to provide the student with the fundamentals of refrigeration and air conditioning relative to shipboard systems.

 

Refrigeration Cycles; Refrigerants and Refrigerant Properties; Component Analysis; System Operation and Maintenance; Refrigeration Processes; System Analysis; Psychrometry; Air Conditioning and Ventilation; Carriage of Refrigerated Cargo by Ships; Safety.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2209 (Marine Engineering Knowledge IV); TRMO 2105 (Thermodynamics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 5 hours/week = 65 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours

 

MREK 3112 (Marine Engineering Knowledge III)

 

This marine engineering course gives students knowledge and understanding of the basic operational principles of ship’s machinery.

 

Fire Detection and Extinguishing Systems; Refrigeration; Vibration; Systems on Vessels Operating in Ice; Engine Power, Propeller Pitch, and Power; Engineering Watch and Safety Practices; Tank Level and Draft Measurement.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2212 (Marine Engineering Knowledge II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

MREK 3201 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This is an intermediate level course designed to give students in Marine Engineering a working knowledge of gas turbines which can be applied to their operation and maintenance.

 

Gas Turbine Types and Classification; Principle of Operation; Structure of Gas Turbines; Gas Turbine Systems; Reduction Gearing for Gas Turbine Installations; Operation and Monitoring; Overview of Naval Gas Turbines.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2203 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

MREK 3202 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This is the final marine engineering course and it is designed to deal with steam/gas propulsion, vibration pollution, and maintenance requirements.

 

Water Tube Boilers; Steam Turbines and Steam Plants; Boiler Water Treatment and Testing; Gas Turbines; Introduction to Vibration; Sewage Plant and Pollution; Maintenance; Tanker Operations; Deck Machinery.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 3104 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 8 hours/week

 

MREK 3203 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

This course is designed to give the students the knowledge of systems, regulations and safety so they can apply this knowledge in their profession.

 

Water Tube Boilers; Steam Turbines and Steam Plants; Boiler Water Treatment and Testing; Waste Heat Recovery Systems; Fresh Water Generation and Treatment; Tanker Safety and Inert Gas Systems; Stern Tubes and CP Propellers; Fire Prevention Systems, Regulations, and Safety; Introduction to Vibrations; Crank Shaft Alignment and Deflection; Maintenance Procedures; Engineer’s Duties.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 3103 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

MREK 3204 (Marine Engineering Knowledge IV)

 

This course is designed to expand on engineering concepts with respect to steam engineering knowledge, gas turbines and maintenance procedures.

 

Water Tube Boilers; Steam Turbines and Steam Plants; Boiler Water Treatment and Testing; Gas Turbines; Waste Heat Recovery Systems.

 

Prerequisites - MREK 3106 (Marine Engineering Knowledge III)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

MREK 3205 (Marine Engineering Knowledge V)

 

This course consists of Level 1 Propulsion Plant Propulsion Simulator course content and general engineering knowledge.

 

Introduction to Vibration; Sewage Plant and Pollution; Maintenance; Confined Space Entry; Deck Machinery; Exhaust Emissions; Oil Pollution Prevention Regulations; Propulsion Plant Simulator Course, Level 1.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 3204 (Marine Engineering Knowledge IV)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week for 13 weeks = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week for 13 weeks = 52 hours total

 

MREK 3206 (Marine Engineering Knowledge VI)

 

This course is designed to expand on engineering knowledge with respect to steam engineering, gas turbines and maintenance procedures.

 

Water Tube Boilers; Steam Boiler Control; Steam Turbines and Steam Plants; Steam Turbine Control; Boiler Water Treatment and Testing; Waste Heat Recovery Systems; Thermal Oil Systems; Gas Turbines.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 1201 (Marine Engineering Knowledge II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

MREK 3207 (Industrial Chemistry)

 

This course will provide an introduction to the composition and analysis of marine fuels and lubricants; the safety precautions required with fuels, lubricants and chemicals during storage, transfer and handling; and outline the damaging effects of corrosion with pipework, equipment and hulls as well as methods to reduce such corrosion.

 

Fundamentals of Chemistry; Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline Conditions; Corrosion; Salt and Freshwater systems; Fuels and Lubricants; Marine Chemicals; Marine Growth Protection Systems; Ballast Water Management; Safety.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week for a total of 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week for a total of 26 hours

 

MREK 3400 (Marine Engineering Knowledge VII)

 

This course addresses advanced marine engineering knowledge subjects.

 

Preventative Maintenance System; Unmanned Machinery Space (UMS); Governor Control System Fault Diagnosis; Automatic and Manually Operated Control Systems; Control Equipment; Surveys and Dry-Docking.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 3206 (Marine Engineering Knowledge VI)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

MREK 3401 (Propulsion Plant Simulation)

This course is designed to provide skills and knowledge regarding the safe and efficient operation of the ship’s machinery utilizing a propulsion plant simulator.

 

Course Introduction; Instrumentation and Controls; Operational Procedures; Auxiliary Units and Systems; Diesel and Shaft Generators; Steam Systems; Main Propulsion Diesel Engine; Troubleshooting; Watchkeeping

 

Prerequisite - MREK 2209 (Marine Engineering Knowledge IV), MREK 3206 (Marine Engineering Knowledge VI), WKTM 2103 (Work Term 2)

 


Duration
- 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 0 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

MREK 340AM (Propulsion Plant Simulator Training)

 

This course is designed to provide skills and knowledge regarding the safe and efficient operation of the ship's machinery utilizing a propulsion plant simulator.

 

Course Introduction; Instrumentation and Controls; Operational Procedures; Auxiliary Units and Systems; Diesel and Shaft Generators; Steam Systems; Main Propulsion Diesel Engine; Troubleshooting; Watchkeeping

 

Prerequisites - MREK 2209 (Marine Engineering Knowledge IV); MREK 3206 (Marine Engineering Knowledge VI); WKTM 2103 (Work Term 2)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 0 hours a week

 

Laboratory - 4 hours a week = 52 hours total

 

MREK 340BM (Propulsion Plant Simulator Training)

 

This course is designed to provide skills and knowledge regarding the safe and efficient operation of the ship's machinery utilizing a propulsion plant simulator.

 

Course Introduction; Instrumentation and Controls; Operational Procedures; Auxiliary Units and Systems; Diesel and Shaft Generators; Steam Systems; Main Propulsion Diesel Engine; Troubleshooting; Watchkeeping

 

Prerequisites - Successful completion of MREK 340AM

 

Duration - 30 hours

 

Laboratory - 30 hours

 

MTPR 1200 (Materials and Processes)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge of the behavior and characteristics of common engineering materials and give them an understanding of basic industrial processes. This will enable the students to select suitable materials and fabrication methods for the design and manufacture of parts to ensure successful service. The course also introduces the analysis of stress in load-bearing structural members. The concepts of stress, strain and elasticity are applied to elementary systems of normal, shear, and torsional stress in order to give students an understanding of one of the fundamental building blocks upon which all engineering designs are based.

 

Structure of Materials; Physical and Mechanical Properties of Materials; Phase Diagrams; Non-ferrous Metals; Heat Treating Steels; Corrosion; Plastics; Ceramics; Basic Stress Systems; Torsional Shearing Stress.

 

Prerequisite - PHYS 1102 (Physics); MATH 1102 (Pre-Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours per week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours every second week = 12 hours total

 

MTPR 1300 (Materials and Processes)

 

This course provides students with basic knowledge about the behaviour and characteristics of common engineering materials and gives them an introduction to basic refining processes. This is important for understanding materials and fabrication methods for the design and manufacture of parts for durable service in the marine environment.

 

Production of Steel and Other Metals; Identification of Metals; Physical and Mechanical Properties of Metals; Structure of Metals; Phase Diagrams; Heat Treating; Non-Metal Materials; Adhesives, Ceramics, and Wood.

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours per week = 30 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours per week = 10 hours total

 

MTPR 2100 (Strength of Materials)

 

This course is an introduction to the analysis of stresses in load bearing structural members. Concepts of stress, strain and elasticity are applied to elementary systems of normal, shear and bending stress in order to give students an understanding of one of the fundamental building blocks upon which all engineering designs are based.

 

Basic Stress Systems; Strain and Elasticity; Mechanical Properties of Materials; Shear Force and Bending Moments; Stress Due to Bending; Torsional Shearing Stress; Statically Indeterminate Systems.

 

Prerequisites - MATH 1101 (Introduction to Calculus); MECH 2102 (Mechanics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

MTPR 2101 (Strength of Materials)

 

This course is an introduction to the analysis of stresses in load bearing structural members. Concepts of stress, strain and elasticity are applied to elementary systems of normal, shear and bending stress in order to give students an understanding of one of the fundamental building blocks upon which all engineering designs are based.

 

Basic Stress Systems; Strain and Elasticity; Mechanical Properties of Materials; Shear Force and Bending Moments; Stress Due to Bending; Torsional Shearing Stress; Combined Bending and Direct Stress; Deflection of Beams.

 

Co-requisites - MATH 1103 (Introduction to Calculus) or MATH 1200 (Calculus); MECH 1100 (Mechanics) or MECH 1101 (Mechanics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

MTPR 2103 (Materials and Processes)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge of the behaviour and characteristics of common engineering materials and give them an understanding of basic industrial processes. This will enable students to select suitable materials and fabrication methods for the design and manufacture of parts to ensure successful service.

 

Production of Steel and Other Metals; Identification of Metals; Physical and Mechanical Properties of Metals; Structure of Metals; Phase Diagrams; Heat Treating; Plastics; Adhesives, Ceramics and Wood.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hour/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

MTPR 2104 (Materials and Processes)

 

This course provides students with knowledge about the behaviour and characteristics of common engineering materials and gives them an understanding of basic industrial processes. This background will enable students to select suitable materials and fabrication methods for the design and manufacture of parts to ensure successful service.

 

Production of Steel and Other Metals; Identification of Metals; Physical and Mechanical Properties of Metals; Structure of Metals; Phase Diagrams; Heat Treating; Plastics; Adhesive, Ceramics, and Wood.

 

Prerequisite - CHEM 1100 (Chemistry)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week = 30 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 10 hours total

 

OR

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week for 5 weeks = 10 hours total

 

MTPR 2108 (Strength of Materials)

 

This course is an introduction to the analysis of stresses in load bearing structural members. Concepts of stress, strain and elasticity are applied to elementary systems of normal, shear and bending stress in order to give students an understanding of one of the fundamental building blocks upon which all engineering designs are based.

 

Basic Stress Systems; Strain and Elasticity; Mechanical Properties of Materials; Shear Force and Bending Moments; Stress due to Bending; Torsional Shearing Stress; Statically Indeterminate Systems.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1105 (Introduction to Calculus); MECH2111 (Statics and Dynamics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks total, excluding final examination

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/ week = 13 hours total

 

MTPR 2208 (Materials and Processes)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge of the behaviour and characteristics of common engineering materials and give them an understanding of basic industrial processes. This will enable students to select suitable materials and fabrication methods for the design and manufacture of parts to ensure successful service.

 

Production of Steel and other Metals; Identification of Metals; Physical and Mechanical Properties of Metals; Structure of Metals; Phase Diagrams; Heat Treating; Inspection and Testing of Materials; Corrosion; Plastics; Adhesives, Ceramics, and Composites.

 

Prerequisites - CHEM 1200 (Chemistry); WKPR 2115 (Mechanical Workshop)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once every second week = 12 hours total

 

MTPR 3100 (Strength of Materials)

 

This second Strength of Materials course expands on previously studied concepts of simple stress, strain and elasticity, and provides a basis for elementary calculations in engineering design.

 

Strain Energy, Impact Loads; Combined Bending and Direct Stresses; Bolted, Riveted and Welded Joints; Deflection of Beams; Columns; Complex Stress and Strain Systems.

 

Prerequisite - MTPR 2100 (Strength of Materials) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

MTPR 3104 (Strength of Materials)

 

This second Strength of Materials course expands on previously studied concepts of simple stress, strain and elasticity, and provides a basis for elementary calculations in engineering design.

 

Strain Energy, Impact Loads; Combined Bending and Direct Stresses; Bolted, Riveted and Welded Joints; Deflection of Beams; Columns; Complex Stress and Strain Systems.

 

Prerequisite - MTPR 2108 (Strength of Materials)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hour/week = 26 hours

 

MTPR 3201 (Strength of Materials)

 

This advanced course in Strength of Materials extends on the application of fundamental principles presented in Strength of Materials 2100 and Strength of Materials 3100. This course is intended to familiarize students with elements of structural design and machine component design often observed aboard ships.

 

Calculation Sheets; Design Morphology; Evaluation of Criteria and Constraints; Problem Analysis; Design Considerations; Codes and Standards; Precision and Rounding of Dimensions.

 

Prerequisite - MTPR 3100 (Strength of Materials)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week

 

NARC 1101 (Ship Hull Geometry)

 

This course will develop an ability to define the complex geometry of a ship’s hull form with emphasis on practical draughting skills required to attain a fair and accurate form.

 

Lines Plan Interpretation; Terminology and Form Coefficients; Hull Forms; Draughting Techniques; Lifting Hull Lines.

 

Prerequisites - PHYS 1200 (Physics); MATH 1101 (Introduction to Calculus); ENGR 1103 (Engineering Graphics); NARC 1103 (Ships & Shipping)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 20 hours total

 

Laboratories - 6 hours/week = 30 hours total

 

NARC 1102 (Ship Structural Geometry)

 

This is an introductory course to ship structures designed to familiarize students with structural arrangements and nomenclature and to improve their computer aided drafting ability.

 

Framing Systems; Bottom Structure; Side Structure; Deck Structure; Bulkhead Structure; Shell Structure; Fore End Structure; Aft End Structure.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus); ENGR 1103 (Engineering Graphics); ENSY 1202 (Introduction to MESD)

 

Co-requisite - ENGR 1201 (Introduction to AutoCAD)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

NARC 1103 (Ships and Shipping)

 

This is a first level course designed to introduce the basic elements of ship design. Ships’ missions are related to vessel dimensions, general layout, hull form, structure and stability characteristics. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of ships’ drawings including the lines plan, general arrangement and profile and decks.

 

Purpose of Ships; Primary Design Criteria; The Ship Design Process; Loads On A Ship; Structural Framing Systems; Ships Types and Structure; Engineering Fundamentals; Buoyancy and Weight; Transverse Stability; Ship Types and Stability.

 

Co-requisite - ENGR 1103

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week - 65 hours total

 

NARC 1104 (Steel Ship Structure)

 

This is an introductory course to ship structures designed to familiarize students with structural arrangements and nomenclature and to improve their computer aided drafting ability.

 

Bottom Structure; Side Structure; Deck Structure; Bulkhead Structure; Shell Structure.

 

Prerequisites - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus); PHYS 1100 (Physics); ENGR 1103 (Engineering Graphics); NARC 1103 (Ships & Shipping)

 

Co-requisite - ENGR 1201 (Introduction to AutoCAD)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

NARC 2100 (Naval Architecture)

 

This is a course designed to develop students’ ability to perform ship area and volume calculations with emphasis on practical skills to read lines plan and extract data to create cross-section drawings in way of machinery spaces.

 

Lines Plan; Draft and Trim; Coefficients of Hull Form; Integrating Rules and Methods; Tonnes per Centimetre of Immersion (TPC); Centre of Flotation; Volume and Displacement; Buoyancy and the Centre of Buoyancy(VCB, LCD); Centre of Gravity; Hydrostatic Curves.

 

Prerequisites - ENSY 1201 (Ship Types and Systems); NARC 1102 (Ship Structural Geometry)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

NARC 2101 (Naval Architecture)

 

This is an intermediate year course designed for students in the Marine Engineering Diploma of Technology program to prepare them for Transport Canada examinations as Second and Chief Engineers.

 

Ship Arrangements and Configurations; Ship Terms and Definitions; Stresses in Ships’ Structures; Steel Sections used in Shipbuilding; Aluminum used in Shipbuilding; Classification Societies and Regulatory Agencies; Keels; Framing Systems; Single-bottom Construction; Double-bottom Construction; Shell Plating; Strengthening for Navigation in Ice; Bulkheads; Deck Structures; Hatch Covers; Forward End Structural Arrangements and Details; Anchoring and Mooring Arrangements; Testing of Anchors and Cables; Aft End Structural Arrangements and Details; Shafting and Stern Tube Alignment.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

NARC 2102 (Shipbuilding)

 

This is the first of two courses to develop the students’ understanding of ship structures and the rules and regulations which affect the design, construction, and repair of ships.

The Ship’s Environment; Stresses on a Ship; Ship Construction Terminology; Plates and Sections; The Hull Girder; Construction Materials; Framing Systems; Construction Details; Interpretation of Ships’ Drawings; Construction of Typical Ship Types; Fore End Structures; and Aft End Structures; Superstructures and Deckhouses; Ice Strengthening.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 1204 (Seamanship II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 13 hours

 

NARC 2103 (Ship Stability)

 

This course develops an understanding of statical stability theory, criteria for stability assessment and rules and regulations impacting on vessel stability. Emphasis is placed on practical application of the theory to generate a complete Trim and Stability Booklet to Transport Canada standards.

 

Large Angle Stability; Free Surface; Inclining Test; Tank Calibrations; Condition Sheets; Rules and Regulations - Stability; Trim and Stability Booklet; Computer Software Application.

 

Prerequisite - NARC 2109 (Hydrostatics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week

 

NARC 2107 (Shipbuilding)

 

This is the first of two intermediate level courses designed to give the students a working knowledge of the methods and practices of modern steel ship construction.

 

Fore End Structure; Aft End Structure; Rudders and Nozzles; Main Machinery, Auxiliary Machinery and Deck Machinery Seatings; Shell; Casings Superstructures and Deckhouses.

 

Prerequisites - MTPR 2104 (Materials & Processes); NARC 1101 (Ship Hull Geometry); NARC 1104 (Steel Ship Structure); MECH 2102 (Mechanics); MATH 1101 (Introduction to Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

NARC 2108 (Outfitting)

 

This intermediate-level course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of the materials, methods and regulations used in the outfitting of steel ships.

 

Crew Accommodation Regulations; Joiner Bhds, Linings, and Ceilings; Deck Coverings; Insulation; HVAC; Furniture and Fittings; Ladders and Stairs; Anchoring and Mooring Equipment; Life Saving Equipment; Cargo Handling Equipment, Masts and Derricks; Hatches, Man Holes, and Doors; Painting and Preservation.

 

Prerequisites - MTPR 2104 (Materials and Processes); NARC 1101 (Ship Hull Geometry); NARC 1104 (Steel Ship Structure); MECH 2102 (Mechanics); MATH 1101 (Introduction to Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

NARC 2109 (Hydrostatics)

 

This is an intermediate level course designed to introduce students to the principles of hydrostatics in preparation for further courses in ship stability.

 

Basic Hydrostatics; Numerical Calculations; Hydrostatics Calculations; Hydrostatic Curves; Ship Mass and Center of Mass; Small Angle Stability; Longitudinal Stability and Trim.

 

Prerequisites - Marine Engineering Systems Design Prerequisites: NARC 1102 (Ship Structural Geometry); MATH 1101 (Introduction to Calculus); MECH 2102 (Mechanics)

 

Naval Architecture Prerequisites: NARC 1101 (Ship Hull Geometry); NARC 1104 (Steel Ship Structure); MATH 1101 (Introduction to Calculus); MECH 2102 (Mechanics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

NARC 2110 (Ship Operations Management)

 

This course will develop a students understanding of the basics of engineering economic analysis and the economic environment in which ships operate.

 

Ship Owners; Income and Expenses; The Time Value of Money; Methods of Economic Analysis; Sensitivity Analysis; Mission Profiles.

 

Prerequisites - NARC 2103 (Ship Stability); NARC 2207 (Ship Building); NARC 2208 (Ship Building)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures/Instruction - 7 hours/week = 35 hours total

 

NARC 2200 (Naval Architecture)

 

This course is designed to develop the student’s understanding of ship’s stability as well as national and international regulations and standards related to stability criteria.

 

Stability at Small Angles of Heel; Longitudinal Stability; Stability at Large Angles of Heel; Effect on Stability by Lifting Weight; Angle of List Caused by Transverse Shift of Items of Deadweight.

 

Prerequisite - NARC 2100 (Naval Architecture)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

NARC 2201 (Resistance and Propulsion)

 

This is an intermediate level course intended to introduce students in the Naval Architecture program to the concepts associated with the resistance associated with ship movement. The course will develop students’ ability to perform calculations associated with propulsion and propeller selection.

 

Ship Resistance; Ship Friction and Viscous Resistance; Wave Making Resistance; Similarity and Model Testing; Other Resistance Components; Propulsion; Preliminary Propeller and Powering Calculation; Screw Propeller; Propeller Ship Interaction; Propeller Cavitation.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 2101 (Advanced Calculus); NARC 2103 (Ship Stability); MREK 2101 (Marine Engineering Knowledge)

 

Co-requisite - NARC 3203 (Hull Form Development Project)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures/Laboratories - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

NARC 2207 (Ship Building)

 

This is the second of two intermediate level courses designed to give the student a working knowledge of the methods and practices of modern steel ship yards.

 

Development of Unit Construction; Unit Breakdown; Unit Drawing; Methods of Joining Structural Parts; Weights and Centroids; Material List and Coding; Lofting; Cutting and Erecting Steel; Forming of Steel Plate; Structural Repair Work; Non-Destructive Examination Techniques.

 

Prerequisites - MREK 2101 (Marine Engineering Knowledge); NARC 2107 (Ship Building); NARC 2108 (Ship Building)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

NARC 2208 (Ship Building)

 

This is the first of two courses designed to give the student a working knowledge of the structural calculations involved in the design of a ship.

 

Ship Building Materials; Simple Ship Stresses; Ship Hull Girder; Longitudinal Strength Calculation; Transverse Strength; Sea Loads; Fatigue/Brittle Fracture; Classification Societies; Midship Section Scantlings and Sections Drawing.

 

Prerequisites - NARC 2109 (Hydrostatics); NARC 2107 (Ship Building); NARC 2108 (Ship Building): MTPR 2100 (Strength of Materials)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

NARC 2209 (Navigation Safety)

 

This course in navigation safety covers the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea with Canadian modifications as contained in Transport Canada’s Collision Regulations TP 10739. It includes IMO’s basic watchkeeping principles and recommendations as stated in the STCW’95 Code sections A-VIII/2 and B-VIII/2.

 

General; Steering and Sailing Rules; Lights and Shapes; Sound and Light Signals; Exemptions and Additional Canadian Provisions; Positioning and Technical Details of Lights and Shapes; Additional Signals for Fishing Vessels in Close Proximity; Technical Details of Sound Signal Appliances; Distress Signals; STCW’95 Standard Watchkeeping Procedures and Practices.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 1204 (Seamanship II), WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week for 13 weeks = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week for 13 weeks = 26 hours total

 

NARC 2228 (Shipbuilding)

 

This is the first of two courses to develop student understanding of ship structures and the rules and regulations which affect the design, construction and repair of ships.

 

Stresses on a Ship; Ship Construction Terminology; Construction of Typical Ship Types; Construction Materials; Framing Systems; Keels and Bottom Structure; Shell Plating; Bulkheads and Pillars; Fore End Structures; Aft End Structures; Decks and Hatches; Superstructures and Deckhouses; Bulwarks and Freeing Ports; Ice Strengthening.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

NARC 2318 (Shipbuilding - Mechanical)

 

This is the second of three courses to develop student understanding of ship structures and the rules and regulations which affect the design, construction and rep of ships.

 

Classification Societies and Regulatory Agencies; Tonnage, Freeboard and Hull Markings; Shipyard Practices; Engine and Boiler Rooms; Casings; Testing of Compartments and Tanks; Ventilators, Sounding, and Filling Pipes; Insulations; Safety Related Issues; Anchoring and Mooring Arrangements and Testing Anchors and Chains.

 

Prerequisites - NARC 2228 (Shipbuilding)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week = 30 hours total

 

NARC 3100 (Naval Architecture)

 

This is an intermediate year course designed for students in the Marine Engineering Diploma of Technology program to prepare them for Transport Canada examinations as Second and Chief Engineers.

 

Rudder Construction; Rudder Theory; Resistance, Powering, and Fuel Consumption; Propellers; Tailshafts and Propeller Mountings; Kort Nozzles or Ducted Propellers; Voith Schneider Propulsion Units; Engine and Boiler Rooms; Casings; Superstructures and Deckhouses; Bulwarks and Freeing Ports; Testing of Compartments and Tanks; Shipyard Practices; Safety Related Issues; Insulations; Ventilators, Air Sounding Pipes, and Filling Pipes; Tonnage, Freeboard, and Hull Markings.

 

Prerequisite - NARC 2101 (Naval Architecture)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

NARC 3102 (Ship Design)

 

This lecture-based course is designed to provide Naval Architecture students with rational design theory and standard tools.

 

Mission Profile; State of the Art; Proportions; Lines; Hull Shape Calculations; Preliminary Structural Calculations; General Arrangement; Powering; Weight Estimate; Electrical Considerations; Machinery Considerations; Capacities; Trim and Stability; Damaged Stability; Regulations; Economic Considerations.

 

Prerequisites - MTPR 3201 (Strength of Materials); ELTK 2104 (Electrotechnology); MREK 2201 (Marine Engineering Knowledge); NARC 2110 (Ship Operations Management); MATH 2101 (Advanced Calculus); NARC 2207 (Ship Building): NARC 2208 (Ship Building)

 

Co-requisite - NARC 3104 (Preliminary Design Project)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 0 hours/week = 0 hours total

 

NARC 3103 (Ship Structural Design)

 

This the second of two courses designed to give the student a working knowledge of the structural calculations involved in the design of a ship.

 

Structural Design Considerations; Survey and Inspection; Testing of Compartments and Tanks; Drydocking Facilities and Docking Procedures; Launching.

 

Prerequisites - MTPR 3201 (Strength of Materials); NARC 2207 (Ship Building); NARC 2208 (Ship Building)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

NARC 3104 (Preliminary Design Project)

 

This practical lab course is designed to give Naval Architecture students the opportunity to apply skills learned in preceding program courses and in the concurrent NARC 3102 (Ship Design) course.

 

Mission Profile; State of the Art; Proportions; Lines; Hull Shape Calculations; Preliminary Structural Calculations; General Arrangement; Powering;; Weight Estimate; Electrical Considerations; Machinery Considerations; Capacities; Trim and Stability; Damaged Stability; Regulations; Economic Considerations.

 

Prerequisites - MTPR 3201 (Strength of Materials); ELTK 2104 (Electrotechnology); MREK 2201 (Marine Engineering Knowledge); NARC 2110 (Ship Operations Management); MATH 2101 (Advanced Calculus); NARC 2207 (Ship Building); NARC 2208 (Ship Building)

 

Co-requisite - NARC 3102 (Ship Design)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 0 hours/week = 0 hours total

 

Laboratories - 6 hours/week = 78 hours total

 

NARC 3106 (Stability)

 

This course develops an understanding of the effect of dynamic forces on stability and studies in detail methods of assessing damaged ship stability including computer software applications. Methods of launching are described and end launch calculations performed. The student becomes familiar with Loadline and Tonnage regulations and their application. Throughout, emphasis is placed on calculations and presentation required by regulatory agencies.

 

Dynamic Stability; Subdivision; Damaged Stability; Docking and Grounding; Launching; Freeboard; Tonnage.

 

Prerequisite - NARC 2103 (Ship Stability)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hour/week

 

NARC 3108 (Boat Design - Composite Structure)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a basic knowledge of the materials, processes and structural details involved with the construction of composite boats,. This will enable the selection of suitable materials and fabrication methods for the design and production of Fibre Reinforced Plastic boat hulls and decks. The student will be able to determine structural scantlings and create the appropriate drawings required for approval by internationally recognized classification societies.

 

Introduction; Materials; Processes; Composite Boat Structure; Design Rules and Regulations; Drawing Standards.

 

Prerequisites - NARC 1101 (Ship Hull Geometry); MTPR 2100 (Strength of Materials)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours per week

 

NARC 3110 (Rudders and Propulsion)

 

This course is designed for Marine Engineering Diploma of Technology students to gain a firm understanding of ship propulsion and resulting fuel consumption. Focus will be directed on various propulsion system characteristics and design. Rudder design and theory is also covered in the course.

 

Resistance, Powering and Fuel Consumption; Propulsion Types; Propellers; Tailshafts and Propeller Mountings; Rudder Construction; Rudder Theory.

 

Prerequisites - NARC 2318 (Shipbuilding-Mechanical)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

NARC 3200 (Naval Architecture)

 

This is an advanced year course designed for students in the Marine Engineering Diploma of Technology program to introduce them to the fundamentals and applications of stability theory.

 

Laws of Flotation; Coefficients of Form, Areas, Volumes, and Moments; Pressures and Centres of Pressure; Centre of Gravity; Free Surface Effects; Transverse Statical Stability; Waves and Rolling; Dynamical Stability; Longitudinal Stability; Change in Draft due to Bilging; Dry-docking and Grounding.

 

Prerequisite - NARC 3100 (Naval Architecture)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

NARC 3201 (Marine Electrical Project)

 

This is a project course designed for advanced Naval Architecture students. It is intended to familiarize the students with the design of the electrical system aboard ships and to enable them to complete the electrical design required for their technical project.

 

Planning; System Analysis; Project Research; System Design; Report Preparation; Report Presentation.

 

Prerequisite - NARC 3102 (Ship Design); NARC 3104 (Preliminary Design Project); NARC 3203 (Hull Form Development Project)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week

 

NARC 3202 (Marine Engineering Project)

 

This (course) project is designed to give students the guided possibility to develop marine engineering design drawings and calculations. The exercise is closely inter-connected with the student Ship Design Project enhancing correctness of ship structure design and space division to accommodate machinery.

 

Tanks Capacity Plan; Ship Systems Single Line Diagrams and Calculations; Shafting Arrangement (sketch); Preliminary Machinery Arrangement and List of Machinery.

 

Prerequisites - NARC 3102 (Ship Design); NARC 3104 (Preliminary Design Project); NARC 3203 (Hull Form Development Project); NARC 2201 (Resistance & Propulsion)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

NARC 3203 (Hull Form Development Project)

 

This course develops an understanding of the factors influencing hull form design. Hand lines and computer generated lines are developed by the student to satisfy particular design criteria. Throughout, emphasis is placed on practical application.

 

Defining the Hull; Factors Influencing Hull Form; Coefficients of Form; Development from Basis Hull Form; First Principle Approach; Preliminary Lines; Computer Generated Lines; Developable Hull Forms.

 

Prerequisite - MTPR 3201 (Strength of Materials); ELTK 2104 (Electrotechnology); MREK 2201 (Marine Engineering Knowledge; NARC 2110 (Ship Operations Management); MATH 2101 (Advanced Calculus)

 

Co-requisites - NARC 3102 (Ship Design); NARC 3104 (Preliminary Design Project); NARC 2201 (Resistance and Propulsion)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

NARC 3204 (Ship Structural Design Project)

 

This course is intended to expand and reinforce the knowledge gained in previous Ship Structure courses.

 

Structural Logic; Scantling Approximations; Scantling Calculations; Detailing; Weight Estimate.

 

Prerequisite - NARC 3102 (Ship Design); NARC 3104 (Preliminary Design Project); NARC 3203 (Hull Form Development Project)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

NARC 3206 (Ship Arrangement Project)

 

This course is designed to give students of Naval Architecture the opportunity to apply skills learned in preceding courses.

 

Proportions; Freeboard; General Arrangement

 

Prerequisite - NARC 3102 (Ship Design); NARC 3104 (Preliminary Design Project); NARC 3203 (Hull Form Development Project); NARC 2201 (Resistance & Propulsion)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 24 hours total

 

NARC 3208 (Boat Design-Fabrication)

 

This is a project based course designed to lead the student through the practical steps involved in the construction of a moulded hull from a designer’s initial lines plan to the first moulded product.

 

Project Management; Quantity Surveying; Plug Design and Construction; Mould Design and Construction; Hull Construction; High Speed Boat Design.

 

Prerequisite - NARC3108 (Boat Design - Composite Structure)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours per week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours per week

 

NARC 3209 (Offshore Installations and Productions)

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with how oil and gas exploration is carried out offshore, provide an introduction to drilling equipment and operations and describe offshore field development options and productions systems.

 

Looking For Oil and Gas Offshore; Offshore Environmental Conditions; Environmental Loads on Offshore Structures; Offshore Exploration – Drilling Vessel Types and Selection; Offshore Exploration – Drilling Equipment and Operations; Offshore Production – Platform Types and Selection; Transportation and Installation of Offshore Structures; Offshore Production Wells; Primary Processing of Oil and Gas Offshore; Classification and Certification.

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 7 hours/week = 35 hours total

 

Lab - 4 hours/week = 20 hours total

 

NARC 3300 (Ship Design Project)

 

This course is designed to give students of Naval Architecture the opportunity to apply skills learned in preceding courses.

 

Capacities; Trim and Stability; Damaged Stability; Cost Estimates; Presentation.

 

Prerequisites - NARC 3201 (Marine Electrical Project); NARC 3202 (Marine Engineering Project); NARC 3203 (Hull Form Development Project); NARC 3204 (Ship Structural Design Project); NARC 3206 (Ship Arrangement Project).

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 18 hours/week = 90 hours total

 

Laboratories - 0 hours/week = 0 hours total

 

NARC 3400 (Naval Architecture - Ship Stability)

 

This is an advanced Naval Architecture course for Marine Engineering Diploma of Technology students, developed to satisfy the learning objectives found in IMO model courses 7.02 & 7.04 related to ship stability

 

Fluid Properties for Hydrostatics; Trapezoidal & Simpson’s Rules; Pressure and Centre of Pressure; Coefficients of Form and Surface Area; Centre of Gravity; Displacement; Buoyancy; Tonnes per Centimetre Immersion, Fresh Water Allowance and Dock Water Allowance; Statical Stability I; Inclining Experiment; Statical Stability II; Free Surface Effect; Longitudinal Stability I; Waves and Rolling of Ships; Longitudinal Stability II; Dynamical Stability; Dry Docking and Grounding; Bilging (Lost Buoyancy); Stability Requirements; Shear Force, Bending Moments and Torsional Stress; Stress Tables and Stress Calculating Equipment (Loadicator); Simplified Stability Information.

 

Prerequisite - NARC 3110 (Rudders and Propulsion)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours/week = 78 hours total

 

Laboratories - 0 hours/week - 0 hours total

 

NASC 0100 (General Ship Knowledge)

 

This is an introductory course intended for new entry seapersons who intend to embark upon a marine career where they form part of the Bridge Watch Team. Its purpose is to provide awareness of the hazards, knowledge, skills, and standards of safe working procedures leading to certification as Bridge Watch Rating in compliance with International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Standards of Training, Certification, and Watchkeeping (STCW) 1978, as amended by STCW 1995 and Transport Canada Marine Safety TP10936E.

 

Organization and the Working Structures of Sea Going Vessels; Types and Classes of Vessels; Cargo Handling Gear; Cargo Operations; General Seamanship; Shipboard Operations; Safety on Board.

 

Lectures - 13 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 6 hours/week

 

NASC 0101 (General Ship Knowledge I)

 

This is an introductory course intended for new entry seafarers who intend to embark upon a marine career where they form part of the Bridge Watch Team. Its purpose is to provide awareness of the hazards, knowledge, skills, and standards of safe working procedures leading to certification as Bridge Watch Rating in compliance with International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Standards of Training, Certification, and Watchkeeping (STCW) 1978, as amended by STCW 1995 and Transport Canada Marine Safety TP10936E.

 

Organization and the Working Structures of Sea Going Vessels; Types and Classes of Vessels; General Seamanship; Shipboard Operations; Safety on Board.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 13 hours/week; 169 hours

 

Laboratories - 6 hours/week; 78 hours total

 

NASC 0201 (General Ship Knowledge II)

 

This is the second of two courses intended for new entry seafarers who intend to embark upon a marine career where they form part of the Bridge Watch Team. Its purpose is to provide awareness of the hazards, knowledge, skills, and standards of safe working procedures leading to certification as Bridge Watch Rating in compliance with International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Standards of Training, Certification, and Watchkeeping (STCW) 1978, as amended by STCW 1995 and Transport Canada Marine Safety TP10936E.

 

Cargo Handling Gear; Cargo Operations; General Seamanship.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 01XX (General Ship Knowledge I)

 

Duration - 4 weeks

 

Lectures - 13 hours/week; 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 6 hours/week; 24 hours total

 

NASC 1100 (Orientation to Cargo Operations and Navigation)

 

An introductory course designed to explore the key aspects of a deck officer’s responsibility, namely navigation and cargo operations.

 

Navigation/Chartwork; Cargo Operations.

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 12 hours/week

 

NASC 1101 (Introduction To Ships)

 

This is an introductory course designed to provide the student with an orientation to the Marine industry and the types of ships that are commonly encountered during a seagoing career. The course will provide the student with a basic vocabulary related to ships and equipment, an introduction to typical shipboard routines and an overview of lookout duties including an introduction to the Collision regulations. A detailed analysis of the requirements of the Cadet Log Book will also be undertaken.

 

Introduction/Business of Shipping; Terminology; General Arrangements/Equipment; Rules of the Road; Cadet Log Book; Shipboard Routines.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

NASC 1102 (Basic Shipboard Rules)

 

This is an entry level course which will develop linkages between theoretical and practical seamanship.

 

Practical Training for Deck Personnel; Rope, Wire, Chains, and Tackles; Confined Space Awareness.

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 9 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 14 hours/week

 

NASC 1104 (Seamanship I)

 

This is an introductory course designed to provide the student with an orientation to the marine industry and the types of ships that are commonly encountered during a seagoing career. The course will provide basic seamanship knowledge about ship terminologies, navigation publications and stability.

 

Introduction/Business of Shipping; Organizational Structure Onboard Ships; Terminology; General Arrangements; Stability; Anchor and Shackles; Cargo Handling Equipment; Mooring; Navigation; Bridge Equipment Onboard Ships; Soundings.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

NASC 1204 (Seamanship II)

 

This is course follows Seamanship I and is designed to provide the student with knowledge of basic ship operations. A detailed analysis of the requirements of the Cadet Log Book will also be undertaken.

 

Introduction to Navigation; Introduction to Collision Regulation; Watchkeeping Duties; Flags; Rope Wire and Tackle; Maintenance and Corrosion Prevention Procedures; Principles of Ship Handling; Pollution Prevention; Log Books; Cadet Log Book.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 1104 (Seamanship I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

NASC 1303 (Shipboard Skills)

 

This course will build upon the knowledge gained in Seamanship Level 1 and Seamanship Level 2 courses to support practical shipboard skill development.

 

Practical Training for Deck Personnel; Rope, Wire, Chains, and Tackles; Fall Arrest Training.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 1204 (Seamanship Level II)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 14 hours/week

 

NASC 1304 (Seamanship for Non-crew Members)

 

This introductory course will provide students who will be employed in non-crew positions with knowledge of vessels and operations as well as with basic seamanship skills.

 

Organization and Working Structure of a Merchant Vessel; Health, Safety, and Environmental Regulations and Policies; General Seamanship

 

Duration - 12 hours

 

NASC 2101 (Stability I)

 

This is a course designed to develop learners’ ability to perform basic stability calculations with emphasis on practical skills, to extract data from hydrostatic curves, and to perform calculations related to ships draft, list, trim, and centre of gravity.

 

Principal Ship Dimensions & Hull Terminology; Draft, Trim, Density & Displacement; Coefficients of Hull Form & Hydrostatic Data; TPC & FWA; Centre of Flotation; Volume and Displacement; Buoyancy and the Centre of Buoyancy; Centre of Gravity; Free Surface; Adding and Shifting Masses; List; Moment to Change Trim; Stability Data Booklet.

 

Prerequisites - MATH 1212 (NASC Mathematics II); PHYS 1104 (Physics); NASC 1104 (Seamanship I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

NASC 2102 (Navigation Systems - SEN 1A1)*

 

NASC 2102 is the first of three SEN courses which the student must complete to obtain a credit in the Nautical Science Diploma of Technology Program and a Canadian Watchkeeping Mate Certificate. The purpose of NASC 2102 is to provide the student with the knowledge and the skill required for the correct operation of navigational equipment and radar to avoid collision or close quarter situations.

 

*Successful completion required as partial requirement for SEN I (Transport Canada) credit.

 

Radar; Automatic Radar Plotting Aid (ARPA); Radar Plotting.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 1303

 

Co-requisite - NASC 2108 (Navigation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week for 13 weeks = 65 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week for 13 labs = 26 hours total

 

NASC 2103 (Seamanship)*

 

This course is designed to give students and in-depth knowledge and practical understanding of work aboard a ship, thus enabling them to become an efficient and effective cadet. The concepts taught here will form the basis for further studies in seamanship.

 

*In order to get a credit for NASC 2103 (Seamanship) a pass must be obtained in the Morse Light section of the course.

 

Ships; Deck Appliances; Lifting Gear; Rope, Wire and Chain; Advanced Rigging; International Code of Signals; Morse Code.

 

Prerequisites - WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase I - Nautical Science)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

NASC 2104 (Principles of Cargo Operations)

 

This course is designed to build on the basic knowledge acquired in NASC 2112 (Introduction to Cargo Operations) and to give the student an advanced understanding of the principles and practices of cargo operations.

 

IMDG Code; Ro-Ro Vessels; Self-unloading Bulk Carriers; Passenger Vessels; Bulk Carriers; Oil Tankers; Container Ships; International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes Code (IMSBC); Refrigerated Cargoes; Palletization of Cargo; Bulk Grain; Grain Loading Regulations; Coal Cargoes.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 2112 (Introduction to Cargo Operations)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week - 52 hours total

 

NASC 2107 (Radio Operator’s Certificate - Maritime Commercial)

 

This course provides participants with the knowledge and practical skills to effectively operate and communicate using the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System, as outlined in the International Maritime Organization’s Resolution A 769 (18).

 

Restricted Operators Certificate - Maritime Commercial; Radiotelephony Communications Procedures; Radiotelephony Operating/Voice Procedures; Digital Selective Calling (DSC); Navigational Telex (NAVTEX); Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) and Search and Rescue Radar Transponder (SART); Power Supplies and Maintenance.

 

Prerequisites - None

 

Duration - 3 days - 21 hours

 

Lectures - 12 lecture /9 practical

 

NASC 2108 (Navigation)

 

This is an introductory course in the fundamentals of the theory and practice of navigation. It is essential to have a sound knowledge of the basic skills of navigation and the ability to apply this knowledge, despite the many technological advances in marine navigation.

 

Navigation; The Terrestrial Sphere; The Nautical Chart; Nautical Chart Symbols and Abbreviations; The Compass; Direction; Navigational Aids,;Obtaining a Position Line; Position Fixing; Current and Leeway; Tides and Tidal Streams; Publications; Electronic Charts.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 1204 (Seamanship II); MATH 1112 (NASC Mathematics I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 6 hours/week = 78 hours

 

NASC 2112 (Introduction to Cargo Operations)

 

This course is designed to build knowledge about cargo operations onboard merchant vessels.

 

Ventilation, Ventilation Systems and Cargo Care; Cargo Stowage, Space Occupied, and Prevention of Damage; Securing Cargoes; Procedures for Receiving, Tallying and Delivering Cargo; Cargo Officer; Care of Cargo during Carriage; Loading Stowage and Discharge of Heavy Weights; Requirements Applicable to Cargo-handling Gear; The use of Vector Diagrams to Calculate Stresses on Cargo Gear; Cargo Calculations.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 1204 (Seamanship II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = a total of 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 0 hours/week = a total of 0 hours

 

NASC 2113 (Electronic Positioning Systems 1 (EPS 1)

 

NASC 2113 is the first of three Simulated Electronic Navigation (SEN) courses which Nautical Science students must complete in order to obtain credit for Transport Canada’s EPS and SEN (O) training requirements. NASC 2113 provides students with the knowledge and the skills required for the correct operation of navigational equipment and radar to avoid collision or close quarter situations.

 

Basic Theory and Operation of a Marine Radar System; Automatic Radar Plotting Aid (ARPA) Systems; Radar Plotting.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 1204 (Seamanship II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week for 13 labs = 26 hours total

 

NASC 2200 (Navigation)

 

Celestial Navigation may be defined as the art and science of determining a ship’s position through observation of the celestial bodies - the sun, moon, planets, and stars. The instrument used to observe the heavenly bodies, the sextant, is symbolic of the history and tradition of the navigator. Although presently somewhat overshadowed by electronic systems, celestial navigation remains a basic and widely used procedure for determining position at sea.

 

This is an introductory course in celestial navigation. The emphasis will be on developing an in depth knowledge of the theory and terminology associated with nautical astronomy.

 

Sailings; Nautical Astronomy; The Celestial Sphere; The Sextant; Altitude Correction; Time; Nautical Almanac; Figure Drawings; Amplitudes, Azimuths, and Twilight; Body Identification.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 2108 (Navigation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 7 hours/week = 91 hours total

 

 

 

NASC 2201 (Basic Tanker Safety)

 

This is an introductory level course designed for non-certified ratings so that they may understand the hazards associated with working in a tanker environment. It also provides them with the knowledge required to work safely in this environment. This course meets and/or exceeds the standards set down in Transport Canada TP 8129E.

 

Petroleum Tanker Design and Construction; Applied Science; Cargo Handling Systems; Operating Procedures; Inert Gas Systems; Crude Oil Washing; Safety in Tank Cleaning and Gas Freeing; Oil Pollution (Sea and Air); Fire Fighting; Emergency Procedures; Regulations and Codes of Practice; Safety Practices and Equipment; Health Issues; Safety in Terminal Operations; Environmental Response.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 2104 (Principles of Cargo Operations & Navigation); WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase I - Nautical Science)

 

Duration - 28 hours (4 days)

 

Theory - 24 hours

 

Practical - 4 hours

 

NASC 2202 (Navigation Systems - SEN 1A2)*

 

NASC 2202 is the second of three SEN courses which the student must complete to obtain a credit in the Nautical Science Diploma of Technology Program and a Canadian Watchkeeping Mate Certificate. The purpose of NASC 2202 is to provide the student with the knowledge and the skill required for the correct operation of navigational equipment.

 

*Successful completion required as partial requirement for SEN I (Transport Canada) credit.

 

Satellite Positioning Systems; Loran-C; Gyro Compass; Auto Pilot and Course Recorders; Echo Sounder; Logs; Voyage Data Recorders (VDR); Automatic Identification System (AIS).

 

Prerequisite -NASC 2102 ( Navigation Systems-SEN 1A1)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week for 13 weeks = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week for 13 labs = 26 hours total

 

NASC 2203 (Seamanship)

 

This course is designed to further a cadet’s knowledge and practical understanding of work aboard a ship in preparation for becoming an efficient, effective junior officer. The concepts taught here will form the basis for further studies in seamanship.

 

Principles of Ship Handling; Anchoring; Mooring; Towing; Offshore Supply Vessel Operations; Navigating in Locks.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 1102 (Basic Shipboard Rules); WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase I – Nautical Science)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

NASC 2207 (Navigation Safety and Communications)

 

This course in Navigation Safety and Communications covers the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea with Canadian modifications as contained in Transport Canada’s TP 10739. It includes IMO’s basic watchkeeping principles and recommendations as stated in the STCW Code sections A-VIII/2 and B-VIII/2. The course includes the International Code of Signals with Morse Code and emphasizes the importance of the proper use of IMO’s Standard Marine Communication Phrases. Also covered in the course is the use of Radio Aids to Marine Navigation and Annual Edition of Notices to Mariners.

 

General; Steering and Sailing Rules; Lights and Shapes; Sound and Light Signals; Distress Signals; Exemptions and Canadian Provisions; Positioning and Technical Details of Lights, Shapes and Sound Signal Appliances; Additional Signals for Fishing Vessels Fishing in Close Proximity; Standard Watchkeeping Procedures and Practices; International Code of Signals; Morse Code; IMO’s Standard Marine Communication Phrases; Radio Aids to Marine Navigation; Annual Edition of Notices to Mariners.

 

Prerequisite - WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5/0 hours per week

 

NASC 2210 (ECDIS)

 

This theory and simulation-based course provides the student with knowledge, skills and understanding of ECDIS and electronic charts to the extent needed to safely navigate vessels whose primary means of navigation is ECDIS.

 

Purpose and Value of ECDIS to Navigation; Correct and Incorrect Use; Workstation Start, Stop, Layout and Basic Navigation; Vessel Position and Position Source; Heading and Drift Vectors; The ECDIS Chart; Ports and Data Feeds; Changing the Settings; Information Layers and Alarms; Vessel Manoeuvring Characteristics; Sensors; Route Planning by Table and Chart; Track Limits and Checking Plan for Safety; Additional Navigational Information; Route Schedule; User Charts In Route Planning; ARPA / Radar Overlay and AIS Function; Procuring and Installing Chart Data/Corrections; System Reset and Backup; Archiving ECDIS Data and Data Logging; Responsibility and Effective Navigation with ECDIS.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 2108 (Navigation)

 

Duration - 5 days for a total of 40 hours

 

Theory - 28 hours

 

Practical - 12 hours (Maximum of 1 participant per ECDIS unit)

 

NASC 2213 (Electronic Positioning Systems 2 (EPS 2))

 

NASC 2213 is the second of three SEN courses required to obtain the Nautical Science Diploma of Technology and Canadian Watchkeeping Mate Certificate. The purpose of NASC 2213 is to provide the student with the knowledge and the skill required for the correct operation of navigational equipment.

 

Electronic Systems of Position Fixing; Echo Sounder System; Speed and Distance Logs; Automatic Information System (AIS); Voyage Data Recorder(VDR); Ship’s Compass and Steering System.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 2113 (Electronic Positioning Systems 1)

 


Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

 

 

NASC 2300 (Navigation Systems - SEN)*

 

NASC 2300 is the third part of three-part mandatory safety related course credit which the student must complete to obtain a credit in the Nautical Science Diploma of Technology Program and the Canadian Watchkeeping Mate Certificate. Students experience proper bridge watchkeeping practices and procedures on a blind pilotage simulator. A simulated course designed for ship’s officers in order to execute proper bridge watchkeeping on board ships.

 

* Successful completion will satisfy the requirements for SEN I (Transport Canada) credit.

 

Radar Simulator’s Ownship’s Controls and Characteristics (IMO); Review of Plotting Skills (Basic Radar); Bridge Navigational Watch; Open Water Navigation (IMO); Operational use of ARPA; Coastal Water Navigation; and Navigate in or near Traffic Separation Schemes.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 2202 (Navigation Systems - Sen)

 

Simulation - 70 hours (minimum of 10 days)

 

NASC 2305 (Radio Communication Protocols)

 

This course provides participants with the knowledge and practical skills to effectively operate and communicate using Radio/Inmarsat Communication System(s) in accordance with the fundamental recommendations for training of maritime radio personnel as outlined in the International Maritime Organization’s Resolution A.703(17).

 

Radio/Inmarsat Communication System Theory; Practical Radio Communication Operations on MF/HF; Practical Inmarsat Communication Procedures on Inmarsat B, C, and Fleet 77.

 

Co-requisite - NASC 2107 (Restricted Operator’s Certificate - Maritime Commercial)

 

Duration - 2 days

 

Lectures/Practical Exercises - 7 hours/day = 14 hours

 

NASC 2306 (Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems) (ECDIS)

 

The purpose of this course is to provide training for students in the sea operation of Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS).

 

ECDIS Definitions, Concepts and Related Authorities; Legal Aspects and Requirements; Principle Types of Electronic Charts; ECDIS Data; Presentation of ECDIS Data; Sensors; Basic Navigational Functions and Settings; Specific Functions for Route Planning; Specific Functions for Route Monitoring; Updating; Display and Function of Other Navigational Information; Errors of Displayed Data; Errors of Interpretation; Status Indications, Indicators and Alarms; Documentation; Integrity Monitoring; Back-Up; Risk of Over-Reliance on ECDIS; Proficiency Demonstration.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 2108 (Navigation) or Pass or Completion of Chartwork and Pilotage (C&P2)

 

Duration - 5 days (30 hours);

 

Theory - 10 hours

 

Practical - 20 hours*

 

* Maximum of 1 participant per ECDIS unit

 

NASC 2307 (Communications)

 

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to use the International Code of Signals, extract a variety of necessary information from the Canadian publications Radio Aids to Marine Navigation and Notices to Mariners – Annual Edition, send and receive signals by Morse light, and use IMO’s Standard Marine Communication Phrases.

 

International Code of Signals; Publications; Morse Code; Standard Marine Communication Phrases.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 1204 (Seamanship II)

 

Duration - 30 hours

 

Lectures - 3 hours/day for 5 days =15 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/day for 5 days =15 hours total

 

NASC 3100 (Navigation)

 

This advanced course in navigation develops the student’s ability to analyze and to solve problems connected with the safe and economic conduct of a passage. The aim of this course is to develop an understanding of chartwork and pilotage up to and beyond that required for the Watchkeeping Mate Certificate of Competency.

 

Navigation Procedures; Advanced Chartwork; The Magnetic Compass; Pilotage; GPS; and Navigation Passage Making/Planning.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 2108 (Navigation); WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase I - Nautical Science)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week

 

NASC 3101 (Navigation Safety - Collision Regulations)

 

This course in Navigation Safety covers the Collision Regulations TP 10739 and the Recommended Code of Nautical Procedures and Practices. (It includes the IMOs Basic Watchkeeping Principles).

 

General; Steering and Sailing Rules; Lights and Shapes; Sound and Light Signals; Distress Signals; Exemptions and Canadian Provisions; Details of Sound and Light Signals; Code of Nautical Procedures and Practices.

 

Prerequisite - WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase I - Nautical Science)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 15 hours/week

 

NASC 3102 (Cargo Operations)

 

This course is designed to build on previous courses to increase the student’s knowledge and understanding of cargo and cargo operations in a practical sense.

 

Ro-Ro Vessels; Self-unloading Bulk Carriers; Liquified Gas Carriers; Chemical Tankers; Passenger Vessels; Timber Deck Cargoes; Timber Deck Cargo Code; Timber Deck Cargo Regulations; Livestock; Voyage Planning and Loadlines; Port Wardens; Cargo Surveys; Cargo Liner Trade; Future Trends; Tank and Hold Inspection.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 2104 (Principles of Cargo Operations & Navigation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

NASC 3103 (Seamanship)

 

This course deals with advanced topics in seamanship and is designed to build on both the sea phase experience of the student as well as other courses in this series covering seafaring skills. Like the other courses in the series, it is meant to prepare the student to become a professional seafarer and an officer.

 

Shipboard Emergencies (At Sea and In Port); Search and Rescue Operations; Ice Navigation; SOLAS 1974 as amended (The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea).

 

Prerequisite - NASC 2203 (Seamanship)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hour/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

NASC 3108 (Stability II)

 

This course builds on the basic theory offered in Stability I (NASC 2101) to develop students’ ability to understand the principles governing small and large angles and intact stability. Practical skills to solve onboard ship stability problems are developed. The elements of Dynamic Stability are discussed and the IMOs Intact Stability Requirements are covered.

 

The Metacentre and Metacentre Height; Small Angle Stability; Cross Curves; Large Angle Stability; Trim and Stability Assessment; Dynamical Stability; Special Criteria for Certain Ships; Considerations for Watertight Integrity; Practical Calculations Using M/V Atlantic Vision and M/V Gypsum Centennial.

 

Prerequisite - NASC 2101 (Stability)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 13 hours total

 

NASC 3200 (Navigation)

 

The aim of this course is to develop an understanding of practical navigation to a level required for all ocean and offshore navigation on board ship. Navigation principles are briefly revisited to ensure the student is fully conversant with the theoretical knowledge covered in other courses.

 

Navigation Principles; Latitude and Time of Meridian Passage; Latitude by Polaris; Position Lines and Position Circles; Sight Reduction Tables and Sight Planning.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 2200 (Navigation); WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II - Nautical Science)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week = 52 hours

 

NASC 3201 (GMDSS)

 

This is a comprehensive course which enables radio station personnel, ashore and afloat, operating in accordance with the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) to utilize efficiently all aspects of the GMDSS communications matrix. In addition, this course adheres to the fundamental recommendations for training of maritime radio personnel as outlined in the International Maritime Organization’s Resolution A. 703(17).

 

The Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS); Regulations and Publications Pertaining to the GMDSS; Radio Theory; Practical Radio Communication Operations on VHF/MF/HF; Digital Selective Calling (DSC); Practical DSC Procedures on VHF/MF/HF; Inmarsat; Practical Inmarsat Communication Procedures on Inmarsat A and C; Enhanced Group Calling (EGC) Telex Over Radio (TOR); NAVTEX; Power Supplies & Maintenance; Emergency Position Indicating Radio-Beacon (EPIRB); Search and Rescue Radar Transponder (SART).

 

Prerequisite - NASC 2107 (Restricted Operator’s Certificate -Maritime Commercial)

 

Duration - 10 days

 

Lectures/Practical Exercises - 6.5 hours/day = 65 hours total

 

NASC 3208 (Stability III)

 

This advanced level course links stability theory with practical applications. Drawing on the student’s knowledge of cargo operations and vessel stability criteria, this course will, through calculations, enhance the student’s ability to optimize cargo distribution and to provide adequate statical and dynamical stability for a vessel’s safe passage.

 

Damage Stability; Grounding and Docking; Pressure Exerted by a Liquid; Vessel Stresses; Longitudinal Strength; M. V. Atlantic Vision and M.V. Gypsum Centennial; Ship Motions; Cargo Loading and Stress Measuring Instruments and Software.

 

Prerequisites - WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II - Nautical Science); NASC 3108 (Stability)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures/Work Periods - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

NASC 3209 (Advanced Navigation Safety)

 

This is an advanced course designed to examine the application of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (Collision Regulations) by building on the knowledge acquired in NASC 2209 (Navigation Safety) and the seagoing experience gained during WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II). Court judgments will be analyzed to illustrate how various rules are applied, particularly when dealing with concepts such as proper look-out, full appraisal, safe speed and positive action in ample time.

 

Collision Regulations Part A – General; Collision Regulations Part B – Steering and Sailing Rules; Collision Regulations Part C – Lights and Shapes; Collision Regulations Part D – Sound and Light Signals.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 2209 (Navigation Safety); WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

NASC 3210 (Navigation Systems and Instruments)

 

This course will enable the student to recognize the fallibility of all electronic aids. The student will recognize the importance of combining different methods of marine navigation while possessing technical skills and a preparedness to fall back on basic, non-electronic navigation methods at any time.

 

Navigation Systems and Instruments; Integrated Bridge Systems (IBS); High Precision Positioning Systems; Dynamic Positioning (DP) Systems; Time; Electricity; Marine Compasses; Heading Control Systems and Auto Pilots; Bridge Equipment and Systems; Marine Radio Communications.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 2202 (Navigation Systems-SEN IA2); WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week for a total of 52 hours

 

NASC 3211 (Seamanship III)

 

This course deals with advanced topics in seamanship and is designed to build on both the student’s sea phase experience as well as other seafaring skills courses. Like the other courses in the series, it is meant to prepare the student to become a professional seafaring officer.

 

Principles of Ship Handling; Steering Control Systems; Anchoring; Mooring; Navigating in Locks; Shipboard Emergencies at Sea and in Port; Search and Rescue (SAR) Operations; Ice Navigation; SOLAS 1974 as amended (The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea).

 

Prerequisites - NASC 1204 (Seamanship II), WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 5 hours/week = 65 hours total

 

NASC 3212 (Navigation Systems and Instruments)

 

This course is a continuation of NASC 3210 Navigation (Systems and Instruments I). The focus is on non-electronic navigation instruments, particularly the marine magnetic compass. It will enable the student to gain knowledge of the principles of magnetic compasses, electromagnetic compasses and marine transmitting magnetic heading devices. It will also enable the student to develop the ability to determine and allow for errors of the magnetic compass.

 

Magnetic Compass; Errors of the Magnetic Compass and their Correction; Compass Adjustment.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 2202 (Navigation Systems-SEN IA2); WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week for a total of 39 hours

 

NASC 3300 (Seamanship)

 

This course is designed to give students an advanced knowledge and understanding of the techniques required to be an efficient and responsible ship handler, and to prepare students to be observant cargo officers who are prepared to make cargo lashing adjustments if and when necessary.

 

Ship Handling; Heavy Lifts and Cargo Lashing; On Board Practical Training.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 3103 (Seamanship); WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II - Nautical Science)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures/Laboratories - 9 hours/week

 

NASC 3303 (Bridge Watchkeeping)

 

Bridge watchkeeping is the most important activity conducted at sea. The Officer of the Watch (OOW) is the Master’s representative and is responsible for the security of the ship and all those aboard. The OOW needs to be proficient in navigation, have a fluent understanding of the Collision Regulations, know how to use the radar/ARPA, be familiar with the bridge instruments, know the ship and its routines, be able to respond to emergencies, handle communications, maintain records correctly and be able to work as a member of the bridge team. This course provides students with an opportunity to build on previous knowledge and training and to practice watchkeeping skills in a simulated environment.

 

Introduction; Manoeuvring Data; Bridge Organization; Voyage Preparation; Officer of the Watch (OOW); Emergencies; Simulation.

 

Prerequisites - WKTM 2102

 

Duration - 8 days (56 hours)

 

NASC 3310 (Transport Canada OOW Exam Preparation)

This course is intended to prepare the student to sit for Transport Canada’s OOW – Orals examination. The oral examination is administered by a Transport Canada Marine Safety and Security Examiner at a Transport Canada Marine Safety and Security examination center. Candidates must be able to demonstrate the ability to apply the knowledge outlined in the oral examination syllabus by appropriate responses, anticipations and reactions to a range of routine, non-routine and contingency scenarios as presented by the examiner, from the perspective of the duties and responsibilities associated with the Officer of the Watch certificate.

Watchkeeping Principles; Marine Sextant; Meteorology; Ship Handling Principles; Steering Control Systems; Anchoring and Mooring Procedures; St-Lawrence Seaway Transit; Cargo Operations; Emergency Response; IMO Conventions; Search and Rescue (SAR) Operations; Normal and Emergency Communications; Damage Inspection and Reporting; Preparation for Adverse Conditions; Canadian Legislation, Regulations and Vessel Documentation; Deck Machinery; Knots and Splices; Rigging.

Prerequisites - NASC 3211 (Seamanship III); WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II)

Duration - 30 hours over a two-week period

OMAP 1302 (Ocean Mapping Field Camp I)

 

This course is designed to provide the students with an opportunity to discover and apply the theoretical and practical elements associated with ocean mapping within a real-world environment. Students will develop a hands-on appreciation and working knowledge of terrestrial and hydrographic surveying techniques and practices, implementation and analysis of oceanographic instrumentation as well as the adoption and appreciation for general ship knowledge, regulations and fundamental seamanship skills for non-crew personnel.

This course will be delivered using modern equipment and methods from a wide variety of sectors and will aid in the development and understanding of the multi-dimensional nature of a typical ocean mapping field camp practicum.

 

Terrestrial Surveying; Hydrographic Surveying; Instrumentation Oceanography; General Ship Knowledge, Regulations and Basic Seamanship.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 154 total hours over the six-week technical session

 

OMAP 2000 (Underwater Acoustic Applications)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and applications of acoustic remote sensing with specific emphasis on its utilization in the marine environment.

 

Introduction; Principles; Applications.

 

Prerequisites - None

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week x 10 weeks = 20 hours total

 

Sea Time - One 3 hours session

 

OMAP 2100 (Advanced Tides and Water Levels)

 

This course provides the student with the opportunity to build upon introductory knowledge previously acquired and become familiar with advanced tides and water level theory. The student will become familiar with and be able to utilize the concepts of surface water levels and their controls including tides, waves and swells and vertical reference surfaces. The design of vertical measurement systems using advanced GPS techniques will also be covered as well as an introduction to coastal hydrodynamic modelling as it relates to vertical surfaces.

 

Vertical Datums and Reference Surfaces; Tide Generation Forces; Signal Processing Primer; Introduction to Fourier Theory; Tidal Spatial Phase and Amplitude Variations; Tidal Constituents; Development of Tidal Predictions; Non Tidal Sea Level Variation; Tidal Zoning

 

Prerequisites: MATH 1200 (Calculus); ONGR 1302 (Hydrography and Tides) or OMAP 1302 (Ocean Mapping Field Camp I)

 

Duration: 13 weeks

 

Lectures: 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories: 2 hours once per week = 26 hours total

 

OMAP 2200 (Side Scan Sonar and Geophysical Remote Sensing)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the theoretical, technical and practical application of Side Scan Sonar and Geophysical Remote Sensing systems and techniques. The course will be taught using modern equipment and methodologies, allowing the student to better understand the benefits and limitations associated with this technology, from data acquisition to data dissemination.

 

Introduction to Side Scan Sonar; Fundamentals of Underwater Acoustics; Side Scan Sonar Fundamentals; Side Scan Sonar Survey Techniques; Trends in Side Scan Sonar Technology; Introduction to Sub Bottom Profiling; The Sub Bottom Record; Return Signal Amplification; Sub Bottom Profiler Design Characteristics; Underwater Acoustic Environments; Sub Bottom Profiler Data Interpretation; Trends in Sub Bottom Profiler Technology; Introduction to Magnetometers; Principles of Magnetometer Surveys; Magnetic Survey Data; Magnetic Survey Problems; Combined Side Scan Sonar and Magnetometer Surveys; Side Scan Sonar and Magnetometer Towing Best Practices; Introduction to Marine Gravimetry.

 

Prerequisites - OMAP 2000 (Underwater Acoustics Applications)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours

 

OMAP 2201 (Multibeam Sonar)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the theoretical, technical and practical application of multibeam sonar systems and techniques. The course will be taught using modern equipment and methodologies, allowing the student to better understand the benefits and limitations associated with this technology, from data acquisition to data dissemination.

 

Introduction to Multibeam Sonar; Fundamentals of Multibeam Echosounding; Seabed Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter; Multibeam Echosounding Process; Multibeam Echosounding Methods; Multibeam Echosounder System Installation; Multibeam Echosounding Survey Design; Future Trends in Multibeam Echosounding Technology.

 

Prerequisites - OMAP 2000 (Underwater Acoustics Applications)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours

 

OMAP 2300 (Field Deployment and Data Collection)

 

This is a practical field course on-board a hydrographic survey vessel. It is designed to give students the experience of safely deploying and operating hydrographic data collection systems. Students will collect, evaluate, and format hydrographic data for the post-processing delivery stage.

 

Marine Safety and Vessel Orientation; Vessel Navigation; Calibration of Data Collection Systems; Single Beam Sonar Data Collection; Sub Bottom Data Collection; Side Scan Sonar Data Collection; Multibeam Sonar Data Collection; Data Delivery.

 

Prerequisites - OMAP 2200 (Side Scan Sonar and Geophysical Remote Sensing); OMAP 2201 (Multibeam Sonar)

 

Co-requisites - OMAP 2301 (Data Processing and Visualization)

 

Duration - 7 days

 

OMAP 2301 (Data Processing and Visualization)

 

This course provides the student with the practical application of the technical capabilities associated with hydrographic data processing and visualization. It will be taught within a variety of analysis environments, offering an avenue for the student to become exposed to the elements required to process, analyze, visualize and disseminate a professional product.

 

Single Beam Echosounder Data Processing; Sub Bottom Profiler Data Processing; Side Scan Sonar Data Processing; Uncertainty Surface Production; Metadata Attribution; Statistical Analysis; Data Visualization and Dissemination.

 

Prerequisites - OMAP 2200 (Side Scan Sonar and Geophysical Remote Sensing); OMAP 2201 (Multibeam Sonar); GEOG 2102 (Mapping and GIS) or equivalent

 

Co-requisites - OMAP 2300 (Field Deployment and Data Collection)

 

Duration - 10 days

 

OMAP 2302 (Ocean Mapping Field Camp II)

 

This course provides the student with the opportunity for practical application of the technical capabilities associated with system deployment, hydrographic data acquisition, ROV survey operations, data processing, and data visualization. This course is taught within a variety of analysis environments, offering an avenue for the student to become exposed to the elements required to collect, evaluate and format hydrographic data for the post-processing delivery stage through to the analysis, visualization and dissemination stages of a professional product.

 

Marine Safety and Vessel Orientation; Vessel Navigation; Single Beam Sonar; Sub Bottom Profiler; Side Scan Sonar; Multibeam Sonar; ROV Survey Operations; Data Delivery, Visualization and Dissemination.

 

Prerequisites - GEOG 2102 (Mapping and GIS) or GEOG 2103 (Introduction to Geographic Information Systems); OMAP 2200 (Side Scan Sonar and Geophysical Remote Sensing); OMAP 2201 (Multibeam Sonar); OMAP 2000 (Underwater Acoustics Applications); and OMAP 1302 (Ocean Mapping Field Camp I)

 

Duration - 20 Days (7 hours per day = 140 total hours)

 

OMAP 3100 (Shipboard System Integration)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to typical mobilization practices necessary to integrate offshore surveying equipment and systems on board a marine survey vessel. The course will be taught with reference to proper installation practices used for many of the surveying systems required to conduct a typical offshore oceanographic/hydrographic survey. This will serve as a framework that students can use to ensure proper system function and integration necessary for safe and efficient conduct of field operations.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 1200 (Electrotechnology); ELTR 2118 (Introduction to Computer Networking)

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - hours/week = 26 hours

 

OMAP 3101 (System Performance)

 

This course provides the student with the ability to understand and quantify the capabilities and limitations of hydrographic data collection systems.

 

Principles of Measurements and Associated Errors; Fundamentals of Total Propagated Uncertainty; Review of Acoustic Principles; System Parameter Definitions; Positioning and Attitude System Performance; Water Level Measurement System Performance; Oceanographic Measurement System Performance; Mechanical Depth Measurement System Performance; Single Beam Sonar System Performance; Sub Bottom Profiling System Performance; Sidescan Sonar System Performance; Bathymetric Sidescan Sonar System Performance; Multibeam Sonar System Performance; Optical Depth Measurement System Performance; Future Performance of Hydrographic Data Collection.

 

Prerequisites - OMAP 2000 (Underwater Acoustics Applications); OMAP 2200 (Sidescan Sonar and Geophysical Remote Sensing); OMAP 2201 (Multibeam Sonar)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - hours/week = 26 hours

 

OMAP 3200 (International Law of the Sea: Geomatics Perspective)

 

This course will familiarize students with the technical aspects of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). Students will apply Geomatics principles in definitions of baselines, territorial seas, the EEZ, and the definition of the continental margin as defined in UNCLOS.

 

Introduction to United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS); Baselines; Outer Limits; Bilateral Boundaries; The Area; Hydrography and Law

 

Prerequisites - GEOG 1301 (Surveying and GPS) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 Weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

OMAP 3201 (Applications of Underwater Acoustic Data)

 

This course will provide the student with a basic knowledge of the scientific, engineering, military, and resources management-related uses of underwater acoustic data. Students will be exposed to the terminology, concepts and background related to the various disciplines that are currently using underwater acoustic data. Students will develop a general understanding of the needs of various consumers of underwater acoustic data and will be informed on current research trends and engineering applications of the technology. Students will also learn to independently carry a small research project using acoustic data.

 

The Development of Underwater Acoustics; Scientific Applications of Underwater Acoustic Data; Engineering Applications of Underwater Acoustic Data; Resource Management Applications of Underwater Acoustic Data; Military Applications of Underwater Acoustic Data; Future Directions in Underwater Acoustic Data Application.

 

Prerequisites - ONGR 1200 (Descriptive Oceanography); or equivalent; ONGR 2107 (Marine Geology and Geophysics); or equivalent; OMAP 2200 (Sidescan Sonar and Seismic Remote Sensing); or equivalent; OMAP 2201 (Multibeam Sonar); or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

OMAP 3202 (Specialized Hydrography)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the theoretical, technical and practical application of specialized industry-related hydrographic practices. These practices will focus on hydrographic support for port management and coastal engineering, offshore geophysical surveying and offshore construction hydrography. The course will be taught using modern equipment and methodologies, allowing the student to better understand the benefits and limitations associated with this technology, from system deployment and data acquisition to data processing, analysis and dissemination.

 

Specialized Hydrography (Fundamentals); Hydrographic Practices for Port Management and Coastal Engineering; Hydrographic Practices for Offshore Geophysical Surveying; Hydrographic Practices for Offshore Construction Hydrography; Future Trends in Specialized Hydrography.

 

Prerequisites - OMAP 2200 (Side Scan Sonar and Geophysical Remote Sensing); OMAP 2201 (Multibeam Sonar); and ONGR 2107 (Marine Geology and Geophysics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

OMAP 3300 (Advanced Survey Design and Implementation)

 

This is a practical field course on-board a hydrographic survey vessel. Students will experience planning and managing a hydrographic survey. Students will build upon the skills gained in OMAP 2300 through further experience in safely deploying and operating hydrographic data collection systems. Students will collect, evaluate, and format hydrographic data for the post-processing delivery stage.

 

Marine Safety and Vessel Orientation; Hydrographic Survey Planning; Vessel Navigation; Calibration of Data Collection Systems; Single Beam Sonar Data Collection; Sub Bottom Profiler Data Collection; Side Scan Sonar Data Collection; Multibeam Sonar Data Collection; Shoreline Feature Positioning; Data Delivery.

 

Prerequisites - OMAP 2300 (Field Deployment and Data Collection); OMAP 2301 (Data Processing and Visualization)

 

Co-requisite - OMAP 3301 (Advanced Data Processing and Visualization)

 

Duration - 7 days

 

OMAP 3301 (Advanced Data Processing and Visualization)

 

This course builds upon knowledge and skills gained in OMAP 2301 and provides the student with opportunities for further practice and advanced application of the technical capabilities associated with acoustic data processing and visualization.

 

Single Beam Echosounder Data Processing; Sub Bottom Profiler Data Processing; Side Scan Sonar Data Processing; Multibeam Echosounder Data Processing; Uncertainty Surface Production; Positioning Data Processing; Metadata Attribution; Statistical Analysis; Data Visualization and Dissemination.

 

Prerequisites - OMAP 2300 (Field Deployment and Data Collection); OMAP 2301 (Data Processing and Visualization)

 

Co-requisite - OMAP 3300 (Advanced Survey Design and Implementation)

 

Duration - 10 days

 

OMAP 3302 (Ocean Mapping Field Camp III)

 

This is an advanced practical field course takes place on-board a hydrographic survey vessel. Students will acquire valuable experience in the overall planning and managing of a hydrographic survey from a "Plan-to-Chart" perspective. Students will build upon their skills by gaining further experience in safely deploying and operating hydrographic data collection systems, acquiring, evaluating and formatting hydrographic data. They will also practice an advanced application of the technical capabilities associated with advanced acoustic data processing and visualization. Other surveying techniques associated with shallow water system deployment, data acquisition and laser scanning operations will offer the students an additional level of expertise within the field of hydrographic surveying.

 

Marine Safety and Vessel Orientation; Hydrographic Survey Planning; Vessel Navigation; Single Beam Sonar; Sub Bottom Profiler; Side Scan Sonar; Multibeam Sonar; Shoreline Feature Positioning; Data Delivery, Visualization and Dissemination.

 

Prerequisite - OMAP 2302 (Ocean Mapping Field Camp II)

 

Duration - 29 days (7 hours per day = 203 hours)

 

OMAP 3400 (Ocean Mapping Data Management Project)

 

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of marine data collection and management. It will encompass the vast array of data pertaining to the dynamic marine environment. Students will produce metadata that is compliant with ocean mapping standards and will collect, interpret and disseminate temporal and spatial data sets pertaining to multidimensional marine data types.

 

Data Management, Marine Points, Marine Lines, Marine Surface Data, Ancillary Marine Data.

 

Prerequisites - GEOG 3101 (Mapping and GIS); GEOG 3200 (Remote Sensing); OMAP 2200 (Side Scan Sonar and Geophysical Remote Sensing); and OMAP 2201 (Multibeam Sonar)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

OMAP 3401 (Ocean Mapping Data Management Project I)

 

This course is designed to provide students with the required knowledge to conceptualize and manage an ocean mapping project. Students will also be exposed to spatial data infrastructure and metadata standards related to multidimensional marine data types. This course is structured so that, by the end, students will have completed a formal project proposal, which they will then implement in OMAP 3501.

 

Project Development; Project Data Scoping, Specifications and Management; Marine Data Types.

 

Prerequisites - GEOG 2102 (Mapping and GIS) or GEOG 2103 (Introduction to Geographic Information Systems); GEOG 2200 (Remote Sensing); OMAP 2200 (Side Scan Sonar and Geophysical Remote Sensing); and OMAP 2201 (Multibeam Sonar)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

OMAP 3500 (Advanced Tides and Water Levels)

 

This course provides the student with the opportunity to build upon introductory knowledge previously acquired and become familiar with advanced tides and water level theory. The student will become familiar with and be able to utilise the concepts of surface water levels and their controls including tides, waves and swells and vertical reference surfaces. The design of vertical measurement systems using advanced GPS techniques will also be covered as well as an introduction to coastal hydrodynamic modelling as it relates to vertical surfaces.

 

Vertical Datums and Reference Surfaces; Tide Generation Forces; Tidal Spatial Phase and Amplitude Variations; Tidal Constituents; Development of Tidal Predictions; Non Tidal Sea Level Variation; Establishment of Tidal Datums; Tidal Zoning; Water Level Measurement Systems Design and Use; GPS Water Level Measurement Systems Design and Use; Spacebased Water Level Measurement; Introduction to Coastal Hydrodynamic Modelling.

 

Prerequisites - ONGR 1302 (Hydrography and Tides)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

OMAP 3501 (Ocean Mapping Data Management Project II)

 

This course follows successful completion of OMAP 3401 where students identified an ocean mapping project and completed a proposal. In this course, students will develop skills in data compilation, conversion techniques and management. Students will produce metadata that is compliant with ocean mapping standards and will collect, interpret and disseminate temporal and spatial data sets pertaining to multidimensional marine data types culminating in a final project.

 

Project Data Scoping, Specifications and Management; Data Formats; Project Development.

 

Prerequisites - OMAP 3401*

 

*NOTE: There must be no longer than a three-semester period between completing OMAP 3401 and registering for OMAP 3501. If there is a longer period of time between these two courses, students must repeat OMAP 3401.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Laboratories - 2 hours twice per week = 52 total hours

 

ONGR 1200 (Descriptive Oceanography)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the physical principles that create oceanographic processes and to provide an integrated view of the whole field of oceanography. A theoretical introduction to the equipment used in ocean research will be provided.

 

Introduction to Oceanography; Physical Properties of the Ocean; Chemical Properties of the Ocean; Biological Properties of the Ocean; Atmospheric Effects; Currents; Waves; Tides.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Sea Time - One 3 hour session

 

ONGR 1201 (Meteorology I)

 

This is an introductory course which teaches fundamental meteorological theory and links the concepts to shipboard practice.

 

The Atmosphere; Transfer of Heat; Temperature; Atmospheric Moisture and Changes of State; Atmospheric Instability/Stability; Fog; Clouds; Precipitation; Thunderstorms; Pressure and Pressure Systems; Winds and Weather Charts.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week every other week = 12 hours total

 

ONGR 1300 (Hydrography and Tides)

 

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of hydrographic survey specifications and planning with respect to tide and water levels. It will introduce students to the principles and characteristics of tidal influence in hydrographic surveys. Also, the course will provide students with practical operation of instruments used for sea level measurement.

 

Introduction to Hydrography; Tides and Water Levels; Water Level Flow and Tidal Currents; Vertical Datums; Harmonic Analysis and Tide Prediction; Instruments for the Measurement of Sea Level.

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ONGR 1301 (Instrumentation Oceanography)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the application of oceanographic data collection including configuration and deployment of appropriate instrumentation packages, as well retrieval and analysis of the data collected.

 

Introduction to Oceanographic Measurement Instruments; Introduction to Maps and Projections; Oceanographic Data Collection; Oceanographic Data Pre-Processing; Plotting and Presenting Data on Map Projections.

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours per week = 12 total hours

 

Laboratories - 6 hours per week = 36 total hours

 

ONGR 1302 (Hydrography and Tides)

 

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of hydrographic survey specifications and planning with respect to tide and water levels. It will introduce students to the principles and characteristics of tidal influence in hydrographic surveys. Also, the course will provide students with practical operation of instruments used for sea level measurement.

 

Introduction to Hydrography; Tides and Water Levels; Water Level Flow and Tidal Currents; Datums; Inland Water Hydrography; Harmonic Analysis and Tidal Predictions; Instruments for the Measurement of Sea Level.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 18 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours twice per week = 24 total hours

 

ONGR 2100 (Hydrography)

 

An introductory course which explores the field work of the hydrographic surveyor and introduces the student to the complexities involved in producing a finished nautical chart.

 

Introduction; Plane Surveying; Geodesy; Projections.

 

Prerequisites - NASC 1204 (Seamanship II)

 

Co-requisite - NASC 2108 (Navigation)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

ONGR 2101 (Oceanography)

 

This is an introductory course which acquaints the student with fundamental physical, chemical and biological oceanographic concepts.

 

Physical Oceanography; Chemical Oceanography; and Biological Oceanography.

 

Prerequisites -WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase I - Nautical Science); Technical Session II - NASC 2107 (Restricted Operator’s Certificate - Maritime Commercial); NASC 2201 (Basic Tanker Safety); NASC 3101 (Navigation Safety - Collision Requirements)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

ONGR 2103 (Oceanography)

 

An introductory oceanography course designed to cover a variety of topics with emphasis on physical and coastal oceanography and the practical skills necessary to sample this environment.

 

Composition of the Oceans; Physical Oceanography; Coastal Processes; and Atmosphere and Climate.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week = 26 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

ONGR 2107 (Marine Geology and Geophysics)

 

This course provides the student with an introduction to the fundamentals of marine geology and geophysics. Emphasis will be placed on the geological and geophysical processes that shape the ocean basins and continental margins including the means to acquire, analyze, interpret and disseminate the data.

 

An Introduction to Geology; Marine Geology; Marine Geophysics; Geotechnical Capabilities.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

ONGR 2203 (Applied Oceanography)

 

This course provides the student with the opportunity to analyze three crucial areas of interest as it relates to the application and analysis of oceanographic principles: weather and climate, marine geology as well as geomatics perspective surrounding the International Law of the Sea. From a weather and climate perspective, the course enables the student to develop a basic understanding of meteorological and climatological concepts and processes. A special focus is put on the interactions between the ocean, the atmosphere, weather and climate at various spatial and temporal scales.

 

From a marine geology perspective, this course provides the student with an introduction to the fundamentals of marine geology as it relates to how the geological and geophysical processes have shaped the ocean basins and continental margins including the means to acquire, analyze, interpret and disseminate the data. Finally, in terms of International Law of the Sea, this course will familiarize students with the technical aspects of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) and will apply Geomatics principles in definitions of baselines, territorial seas, the EEZ, and the definition of the continental margin as defined in UNCLOS.

 

Weather and Climate; Marine Geology; International Law of the Sea

 

Prerequisite - ONGR 1200 (Descriptive Oceanography)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

ONGR 2300 (Instrumentation Oceanography)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the physical and chemical principles that create oceanographic processes with a special emphasis on the equipment used in ocean research.

 

Introduction to Oceanography; Introduction to Maps and Projections; Properties of the Ocean; Ocean Sediment; Atmospheric Effects; Currents; Waves; Tides.

 

Prerequisites - MATH 2101 (Mathematics); PHYS 1200 (Physics); FLDS 2100 (Fluids)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 8 hours/week = 40 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 10 hours total

 

ONGR 3100 (Meteorology)

 

This course provides an introduction to fundamental meteorological theory and links the concepts to shipboard practice.

 

Instruments; The Atmosphere; Pressure; Temperature; Water Vapour; Clouds; Precipitation; Visibility and Fog; Wind; Temperate and Polar Zone Circulation; Tropical and Subtropical Circulation; Organization and Operation of Meteorological Services; Forecasting.

 

Prerequisites - WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II - Nautical Science)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

ONGR 3101 (Meteorology II)

 

This course builds upon the knowledge and skills gained in ONGR 1201 (Meteorology 1).

 

Air Masses and the Planetary System of Wind and Pressure; Fronts; Families of Depressions or Extra-Tropical Cyclones; Waves and Swells; Oceanic Currents and Effect on the Climate; Tropical Revolving Storms; Ice Formation and Decay; Ice Detection and Reporting; Weather Messages and Codes; Optimum Weather Routing; Requirements; Synoptic and Prognostic Charts.

 

Prerequisite - ONGR 1201 (Meteorology I); WKTM 2102 (Work Term 2)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours

 

ONGR 3500 (Weather and Climate)

 

The Earth’s climate system has been steadily evolving since the planet’s formation 4.6 billion years ago, and the climate we experience today is a result of the joint development of the atmosphere, oceans, land surface and biology (including humans). This course provides the student with a basic understanding of meteorological and climatological concepts and processes. A special focus is put on the interactions between the ocean, the atmosphere, weather and climate at various spatial and temporal scales.

 

The Atmosphere; Heat Budget and Temperature; Humidity and Condensation; Air Pressure and Wind; Air Masses, Fronts and Weather Systems; Extreme weather; Global Climate and Earth’s Changing Climate; Forecasting.

 

Prerequisite - ONGR 1200 (Descriptive Oceanography)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

ONGR 4101 (Coastal Oceanography and Geomorphology)

 

This is an introductory course on General Oceanography and Geomorphology designed to provide the participants with an integral view of the physical-chemical, biological and geological components of the ocean and its interaction with the continent in the structuring of the coastal zones. It will also review the interactions of ocean-atmosphere in the generation of climate.

 

Physical-Chemical Oceanography; Biological Oceanography; Ocean Dynamics; Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction; Oceanographic Data Collection and Analysis; Geological Structure of the Continents and Oceans; Erosional and Depositional Shores; Man made Alterations of the Coastline.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - .3 hours/week

 

Tutorials - 1 hour/week

 

ONGR 4104 (Coastal Oceanography & Climatology)

 

This is an introductory course on general oceanography and climatology designed to provide the participants with an integral knowledge of the physical and chemical components of the ocean and its interaction with coastal areas of the continent. It will also review many aspects of climatology and the impacts they have on ocean characteristics.

 

Properties of Water and Seawater; Geological Structure of the Ocean Floor; Seafloor Sediments; Climate and Weather; Atmospheric and Ocean Circulation; Tropical Storms and Hurricanes; Ocean Waves; Tides.

 

Duration - 52 hours

 

Lectures - 39 hours (3 hours/week)

 

Tutorials - 13 hours (1 hour/week)

 

ONGR 4300 (Coastal Geomorphology)

 

This is an introductory course on Coastal Geomorphology designed to provide the participants with an integral view of the forces, both past and present, which interact with the coast and its features and are responsible for its dynamic physical appearance.

 

Introduction to Geomorphology; Coastal Geomorphology; Coastal Erosion and Deposition; Land and Sea Level Changes; Coastal Dunes; Coral Reefs; Man-Made Alterations to the Coast.

 

Prerequisite - ONGR 4104 (Coastal Oceanography and Climatology)

 

Duration - 39 hours

 

PHYS 1100 (Physics)

 

This is an introductory Physics course designed to extend the students knowledge and understanding of basic Physics principles, concepts and applications related to mechanics. The course also extends abilities in data handling, problem solving and experimentation.

 

The Nature of Physics; Describing Motion, Kinematics in one Dimension; Kinematics in two Dimensions, Vectors; Motion and Force, Dynamics; Circular Motion, Gravitation; ; Rotational Kinematics; Bodies in Equilibrium; Work and Energy; Linear Momentum.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

PHYS 1101 (Physics)

 

This is an introductory level Physics course designed to extend the student’s knowledge and understanding of basic Physics principles, concepts, and applications. A selection of practical exercises designed to augment and extend classroom instruction will complement the course.

 

The Nature of Physics; Motion and Vectors; Dynamics; Work, Energy, and Power; Properties of Matter; Wave Motion; Fluid Mechanics; Heat.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

PHYS 1102 (Physics)

 

This is an introductory Physics course designed to extend the students’ knowledge and understanding of basic Physics principles, concepts and applications related to mechanics. The course also extends abilities in data handling, problem solving and experimentation.

 

The Nature of Physics; Describing Motion: Kinematics in One and Two Dimensions; Dynamics: Motion and Force; Work and Energy; Bodies in Equilibrium; Linear Momentum; Rotational Dynamics; Simple Machines; Temperature, Thermal Expansion, and Thermodynamics.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

PHYS 1103 (Physics)

 

This is an introductory Physics course designed to extend the students’ knowledge and understanding of basic Physics principles, concepts and applications related to mechanics. The course also extends abilities in data handling, problem solving and experimentation.

 

The Nature of Physics; Describing motion; Kinematics in one Dimension; Kinematics in two Dimensions; Vectors; Motion and Force; Dynamics; Circular Motion; Gravitation; Bodies in Equilibrium; Work and Energy; Linear Momentum.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

PHYS 1104 (Physics)

 

This is an introductory Physics course designed to extend the students’ knowledge and understanding of basic Physics principles, concepts and applications related to mechanics. The course also extends abilities in data handling, problem solving and experimentation.

 

The Nature of Physics; Kinematics: Describing Motion in One Dimension; Kinematics: Describing Motion in Two Dimensions; Dynamics: Motion and Force; Dynamics: Uniform Circular Motion and Universal Gravitation; Work and Energy; Linear Momentum; Rotational Dynamics; Bodies in Equilibrium (Statics); Simple Machines.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

PHYS 1200 (Physics)

 

This is a second semester course designed to extend the students’ knowledge and understanding of basic Physics principles, concepts and applications relating to kinetic theory, heat, vibrations, sound and light. It also extends abilities in data handling, problem solving and experimentation.

 

Properties of Materials; Fluid Mechanics; Vibrations and Wave Motion; Sound; Kinetic Theory; Heat and Heat Transfer; Light.

 

Prerequisite - PHYS 1100 (Physics) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

PHYS 1204 (Physics)

 

This is a second semester course designed to extend the students’ knowledge and understanding of basic Physics principles, concepts and applications relating to kinetic theory, heat, vibrations, sound and light. It also extends abilities in data handling, problem solving and experimentation.

 

Properties of Materials; Elasticity of Materials; Vibrations; Mechanical Waves; Sound; Fluid Mechanics; Heat and Heat Transfer; Gas Laws and Kinetic Theory; Light.

 

Prerequisite - PHYS 1100 (Physics) or PHYS 1104 (Physics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

QLAS 0001 (Handling and Holding of Fish and Shellfish)

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic techniques involved in handling and holding fish and shellfish onboard a vessel.

 

Fisheries Overview (Newfoundland and Labrador); Basic Biology of Fish and Shellfish; Types of Fish and Shellfish Spoilage and Control; Maximizing Live and Fresh Chilled Grade I Quality Shelf-Life; Fish and Shellfish Handling and Holding Onboard Vessel and Onshore; Sanitation and Hygiene Onboard Vessel; Fish and Shellfish Handling and Holding Procedures.

 

Duration - One week (5 days)

 

QLAS 0300 (Quality Assurance and Control)

 

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the concepts and requirements of quality assurance and control as applied to offshore steel fabrication, such as interpreting standards, controlling the acceptance of raw materials, controlling quality variables and documenting the process. It includes information on quality concepts, codes, standards, documentation, and communications.

 

Overview of Offshore Steel Fabrication, Quality Assurance and Control, Materials, Inspection, Requirements, Inspection Methods, QA Reports, Change Orders and Plan Approvals.

 

Prerequisite - Successful completion of all courses in Term 1 and Term 2

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 6/0

 

QLAS 2104 (Food Evaluation)

 

This course is designed to provide an in-depth knowledge of the quality assessment techniques involved in the food industry.

 

Product Evaluation; Sensory Analysis; Viscosity Evaluation; Texture Evaluation; Colour Evaluation; Size, Shape, Symmetry & Style; Defects; Standards of Measurement and Calibration; Chemical Measurements.

 

Prerequisites - FDTE 1100 (Introduction to Food Science & Technology)

 

Duration - 2 weeks

 

Lectures - 13 hours per week = 26 hours total

 

Laboratories - 19.5 hours once per week = 39 hours total

 

QLAS 3101 (Quality Assurance)

 

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the design and implementation of quality programs in the food industry.

 

Quality and The Food Industry; Quality Concepts; Quality of Design: Product; Quality of Design: Production and Processes; Quality Costs; Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP); Food Safety Enhancement Program (FSEP); Quality Management Program (QMP); Total Quality Management (TQM); ISO22000:2005(E) Standard; British Retail Consortium (BRC) Standard.

 

Prerequisites - FDTE 2112 (Food Sanitation); QLAS 2104 (Food Evaluation)

 

Co-requisites - BIOL 2202 (Microbiology); FDTE 3106 (Seafood Processing Technology)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 39 hours (3 hours/week)

 

Practical - 26 hours (2 hours/week)

 

ROVO 1300 (ROV Simulator Training - Introduction)

 

This course is designed to expose the students to the facets of ROV piloting in a simulated environment.

 

Basic Flying Protocols in Simulated Environments; Simulated Flying Exercises.

 

Prerequisites - ROVO 2200 (Introduction to ROV Systems)

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week = 18 total hours

 

ROVO 1301 (ROV Tooling)

 

This practical laboratory-based course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop and practice skills that will enable them to manufacture brackets to attach additional cameras, sonar or any other ancillary equipment to an ROV.

 

Measure, Cut, Drill and Deburr; Fabricate Mounting Hardware; Fabricate Wire Whips.

 

Prerequisites - None

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Laboratories - 3 hours once per week = 18 hours total

 

ROVO 2200 (Introduction to ROV Systems)

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the various types of ROVs and their essential system elements.

 

ROV Classifications; Control Cabin/Work Van Design and Function; External Generators/MG (Motor Generator) Sets; TMS (Tether Management System)/Vehicle Components and their Operating Principles.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Sea Time - One 3 hour session

 

ROVO 2201 (ROV Operations)

 

This course is designed to instruct students in the proficient and safe operation of underwater robotic systems throughout their full range of subsea applications.

 

Basic Operations; Spheres of Operation; ROV Sub Systems Utilization.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week (13 Labs) = 26 hours total

 

ROVO 2202 (ROV Maintenance)

 

This course is designed to generate within the students the ability to troubleshoot and repair any and all malfunctions which are inherent to underwater robotics technology.

 

Troubleshooting and Maintenance of Electrical/Electronics Hardware; Troubleshooting and Maintenance of Hydraulic/Mechanical Hardware; Preventative Maintenance Regimes.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week (13 Labs) = 26 hours total

 

ROVO 2204 (Launch and Recovery Systems or LARS)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the basics types, operation and maintenance of Launch and Recovery systems.

 

Types of LARS: LARS Components and Maintenance, Lift Winches; A-frame Assembly; Control Station; Parking Platform Safety; Rigging, Slinging and Hoisting and Fasteners.

 

Prerequisites - PHYS 1100 (Physics) or PHYS 1101 (Physics); WKPR 2118 (Workshop Practice)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/2 week (6 Labs) = 12 hours total

 

ROVO 2205 (ROV Maintenance and Launch and Recovery Systems (LARS))

 

This course is designed to enable students to develop the ability to troubleshoot and repair any and all malfunctions which are inherent to underwater robotics technology as well as to introduce them to the basic types, operation and maintenance of Launch and Recovery systems.

 

Types of Launch and Recovery Systems (LARS); LARS Components and Maintenance; Lift Winches; A-frame Assembly; Control Station; Parking Platform Safety; Rigging , Slinging, and Hoisting; Fasteners; Troubleshooting and Maintenance of Electrical/Electronic Hardware; Troubleshooting and Maintenance of Hydraulic/Mechanical Hardware; Preventative Maintenance Regimes.

 

Prerequisites - ELTK 2118 (High Voltage Safety); FLDS 2108 (Introduction to Fluid Statics, Dynamics & Hydraulics); WKPR 2118 (Workshop Practices)

 

Co-requisite - ELTR 2116 (Industrial Electronics & Controls)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 4 hours per week (Two 2-hour labs per week with a total of 26 Labs) = 52 hours total

 

ROVO 2300 (ROV Ship Interaction)

 

This course gives the student an introduction to dynamic positioning (DP) operations on vessels equipped with ROVs. It enables the student to understand the operation of a DP system and to assess the operation of a DP system during ROV operations.

 

Dynamic Positioning; Dynamic Positioning Principles; Sensors; Dynamic Positioning Applications; Coordinate Systems; Position References; Thrusters and Manoeuvring Systems; Dynamic Positioning Modes; Power Management Systems; Dynamic Positioning Operations; Regulations; Dynamic Positioning Control Console.

 

Prerequisites - ROVO 2200 (Introduction to ROV); ROVO 2201 (ROV Operations); ROVO 2205 (ROV Maintenance and LARS); OMAP 2000 (Underwater Acoustic Application)

 

Duration - 3 days (21 hours)

 

ROVO 2301 (ROV Pilot Training)

 

This course is designed to instruct the students in the methods employed to pilot an eyeball class ROV under real world situations involving static and dynamic water environments.

 

Basic Piloting Protocols; Task Specific Flying Exercises; Flying in Heavy Currents Scenarios.

 

Prerequisites - ROVO 2200 (Introduction to ROV); ROVO 2201 (ROV Operations); ROVO 2205 (ROV Maintenance and LARS); OMAP 2000 (Underwater Acoustic Application)

 

Duration - 42 hours

 

ROVO 2302 (ROV Simulator Training)

 

This course is designed to instruct the students in the major facets of ROV piloting.

 

Basic Flying Protocols in Simulated Environments; Simulated Flying Exercises.

 

Prerequisites - ROVO 2200 (Introduction to ROV); ROVO 2201 (ROV Operations); ROVO 2202 (ROV Maintenance); OMAP 2000 (Underwater Acoustic Applications); ROVO 2204 (LARS)

 

Duration - 70 hours

 

ROVO 2303 (ROV Simulator Training - Advanced)

 

This course is designed to expose students in all facets of ROV piloting in a simulated environment.

 

Advanced Flying Protocols in Simulated Environments; Simulated Setup and Flying Exercises.

 

Prerequisite - ROVO 1300 (ROV Simulator Training - Introduction)

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Laboratories - A total of 52 logged hours to be completed over the six-week technical session

 

ROVO 3100 (Introduction to ROV Systems)

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the various types of ROVs and their essential system elements.

 

ROV Classifications; Control Cabin/Work Van Design and Function; External Generators/MG (Motor Generator) Sets; TMS (Tether Management System)/Vehicle Components and their Operating Principles.

 

Prerequisites - Term 1 ROV Program which include: ELTK 3104 (Electrotechnology); ELTR 3117 (Fabrication); ELTR 3118 (Industrial Electronic and Controls); ELTR 3119 (Data Communications); ENGR 3100 (Blueprint Reading); FLDS 3106 (Introduction to Fluid Statics & Dynamics); FLDS 3107 (Hydraulic Controls); WKPR 3106 (Workshop Practice)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

ROVO 3101 (ROV Operations)

 

This course is designed to instruct students in the proficient and safe operation of underwater robotic systems throughout their full range of subsea applications.

 

Basic Operations; Spheres of Operation; ROV Sub Systems Utilization

 

Prerequisites - Term 1 ROV Program which include: ELTK 3104 (Electrotechnology); ELTR 3117 (Fabrication); ELTR 3118 (Industrial Electronic and Controls); ELTR 3119 (Data Communications); ENGR 3100 (Blueprint Reading); FLDS 3106 (Introduction to Fluid Statics & Dynamics); FLDS 3107 (Hydraulic Controls); WKPR 3106 (Workshop Practice)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week (13 Labs) = 26 hours total

 

ROVO 3102 (ROV Maintenance)

 

This course is designed to generate within the students the ability to troubleshoot and repair any and all malfunctions which are inherent to underwater robotics technology.

 

Troubleshooting and Maintenance of Electrical/Electronics Hardware; Troubleshooting and Maintenance of Hydraulic/Mechanical Hardware; Preventative Maintenance Regimes.

 

Prerequisites - Term 1 ROV Program which include: ELTK 3104 (Electrotechnology); ELTR 3117 (Fabrication); ELTR 3118 (Industrial Electronic and Controls); ELTR 3119 (Data Communications); ENGR 3100 (Blueprint Reading); FLDS 3106 (Introduction to Fluid Statics & Dynamics); FLDS 3107 (Hydraulic Controls); WKPR 3106 (Workshop Practice)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week (13 Labs) = 26 hours total

 

ROVO 3103 (Underwater Acoustic Applications)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and applications of acoustic remote sensing with specific emphasis on its utilization in ROV operations.

 

Introduction; Principles; Applications.

 

Prerequisites - Term 1 ROV Program which include: ELTK 3104 (Electrotechnology); ELTR 3117 (Fabrication); ELTR 3118 (Industrial Electronic and Controls); ELTR 3119 (Data Communications); ENGR 3100 (Blueprint Reading); FLDS 3100 (Introduction to Fluid Statics & Dynamics); FLDS 3107 (Hydraulic Controls); WKPR 3106 (Workshop Practice)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours biweekly = 12 hours total

 

ROVO 3104 (Launch and Recovery Systems or LARS)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the basics types, operation and maintenance of Launch and Recovery systems.

 

Types of LARS: Dynacon A-frame, Pedestal Cranes, Miscellaneous System Elements: LARS Components, Lift Winches, Parking Platforms, A-frames and Control Stations.

 

Prerequisites - Term 1 ROV Program which include: ELTK 3104 (Electrotechnology); ELTR 3117 (Fabrication); ELTR 3118 (Industrial Electronic and Controls); ELTR 3119 (Data Communications); ENGR 3100 (Blueprint Reading); FLDS 3106 (Introduction to Fluid Statics & Dynamics); FLDS 3107 (Hydraulic Controls); WKPR 3106 (Workshop Practice)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/2 week (6 Labs) = 12 hours total

 

ROVO 3105 (ROV Ship Interaction)

 

This course gives the student an introduction to dynamic positioning (DP) operations on vessels equipped with ROVs. It enables the student to understand the operation of a DP system and to assess the operation of a DP system during ROV operations.

 

Dynamic Positioning; Dynamic Positioning Principles; Sensors; Dynamic Positioning Applications; Coordinate Systems; Position References; Thrusters and Manoeuvring Systems; Dynamic Positioning Modes; Power Management Systems; Dynamic Positioning Operations; Regulations; Dynamic Positioning Control Console.

 

Prerequisites - Term 2 ROV Program which include: ELTK 3105 (High Voltage Safety); ROVO 3100 (Introduction to ROV Systems); ROVO 3103 (Underwater Acoustic Applications); ROVO 3104 (Launch & Recovery Systems or LARS); ROVO 3101 (ROV Operations); ROVO 3102 (ROV Maintenance)

 

Duration - 4 days (28 hours)

 

ROVO 3106 (Pilot Training)

 

This course is designed to instruct the students in the methods employed to pilot an eyeball class ROV under real world situations involving static and dynamic water environments.

 

Basic Piloting Protocols; Task Specific Flying Exercises; Flying in Heavy Currents Scenarios.

 

Prerequisites - ROV Program Term 2: ELTK 3105 (High Voltage Safety); ROVO 3100 (Introduction to ROV Systems); ROVO 3101 (ROV Operations); ROVO 3102 (ROV Maintenance); ROVO 3103 (Underwater Acoustics Applications); ROVO 3104 (Launch & Recovery Systems or LARS)

 

Duration - 42 hours

 

ROVO 3107 (ROV Simulator Training)

 

This course is designed to instruct the students in the major facets of ROV piloting.

 

Basic Flying Protocols in Simulated Environments; Simulated Flying Exercises.

 

Prerequisites - ROV Program Term 2 which include: ELTK 3105 (High Voltage Safety); ROVO 3100 (Introduction to ROV Systems); ROVO 3101 (ROV Operations); ROVO 3102 (ROV Maintenance); ROVO 3103 (Underwater Acoustics Applications); ROVO 3104 (Launch & Recovery Systems or LARS)

 

Duration - 70 hours

 

ROVO 3200 (AUV Designs and Operations)

 

This course is designed to familiarise the students with the overall systems and subsystems of AUV technology including design, construction, propulsion, control and sensory hardware/software, as well as typical AUV operational tasks.

 

AUV Shells, Base Structures, and Body Types; Power Supplies, Thrusters, Control Electronics Environmental Sensors, Software Basics; Field Applications and Operations.

 

Prerequisites - (Industrial Electronic and Controls)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week (13 Labs) = 26 hours total

 

ROVO 3300 (Remotely Operated Vehicle Survey Operations)

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the piloting and operation of Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) and their associated hardware. It will provide students exposure to working with ROV operations in the supporting role of the ocean mapper.

 

Survey Data Preparation for ROV Operations; Introduction to ROV Operations; ROV Sonar Familiarization; Ultra Short Baseline (USBL) Equipment Setup and Operation; Practical ROV Piloting Skills; ROV Navigation Using USBL.

 

Prerequisite - OMAP 2000 (Underwater Acoustics Applications)

 

Duration - 21 hours

 

SFTY 0001 (Basic Boat Skills)

 

This course is designed to instill workers/participants with an increased awareness and knowledge of the small boat safety and skills related to aquaculture activities. It will include theory and practical skills components for inexperienced workers to orient them to basic navigation, proper handling, docking, loading and other fundamental boat skills.

 

Types of Hulls; Environmental Forces Acting on a Boat; Propulsion and Steering; Boat Handling Characteristics; Boat Handling Procedures; Boat Handling in Heavy Weather; Navigation; Practical Boat Handling.

 

Duration - 5 days

 

SFTY 0200 (Workplace Safety Skills)

 

This course provides participants with the knowledge and practical skills necessary to perform their duties safely within their workplace.

 

Occupational Health and Safety Act – Laws and Regulations, Workplace Health and Safety Responsibilities, Safety Committee, Employee Rights, Workplace Diversity, Duties of Safety Officers, Civil Law Implications, and Accident and Incident Reporting.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratory - 1 hour/week

 

SFTY 1100 (Marine Emergency Duties) SFTY 1108 (A1 - Basic Safety)

 

This course is designed to provide seafarers with the minimum knowledge of emergency response required to safely work aboard a vessel according to the Transport Canada course syllabus in Marine Publication TP 4957.

 

Introduction and Safety; Hazards and Emergencies; Emergency Response; Firefighting; Lifesaving Appliances and Abandonment; Survival; Rescue

 

Prerequisites - Marine Institute approved medical clearance

 

Duration - 20 hours - 3 days

 

Theory - 12 hours

 

Practical - 8 hours

 

SFTY 1100 (Marine Emergency Duties) SFTY 1110 (B1 - Survival Craft)

 

This course is intended to train individuals in personal marine survival techniques, and in the use of survival craft to an extent appropriate to the functions of crew members of ships. It complies with or exceeds the requirements of Transport Canada’s (Marine Safety Directorate), Marine Emergency Duties B1.

 

Survival Craft and Launching Systems; Small Team Leadership Techniques; Abandoning and Practical Boatwork; Survival; Distress Signals; and Rescue.

 

Duration - 35 hours

 

Lectures - 15 hours

 

Practical - 20 hours

 

SFTY 1100 (Marine Emergency Duties) SFTY 1111 (B2 - Marine Firefighting)

 

This is a basic firefighting course which introduces the student to both the theoretical and practical aspects of Marine firefighting.

 

Fire Science; Cause and Prevention; Equipment; Construction and Arrangement; Firefighting Procedures; Fixed Fire Detection and Extinguishing Systems.

 

Duration - 5 days

 

Theory - 15 hours

 

Practical - 14 hours

 

SFTY 1101 (Standard First Aid)

 

An approved training provider will deliver this two-day course.

 

SFTY 1102 (Marine Basic First Aid STCW A-VI/1-3)

 

This is a basic first aid training course for seafarers that meets IMO: STCW Regulation VI/ 4 and STCW Code Section A-V1/ 4, and requirements under TP 13008 Training Standards for Marine First Aid and Marine Medical Care. This course is designed for seafarers who would apply immediate basic first aid in the event of an accident or illness onboard a vessel.

 

General Principles, Body Structure and Functions, Positioning of Casualty, the Unconscious Casualty, Resuscitation, Control Bleeding, Management of Shock, Burns, Scalds, and Accidents caused by Electricity, Rescue and Transport of Casualty, Fractures, Dislocations, and Muscular injuries, Medical Emergencies, Head and Spine Injuries, Wounds, Heat and Cold Related Emergencies, Poison, Bites and Stings, Other Topics.

 

Prerequisites - None

 

Duration - 17 hours

 

Theory - 10 hours

 

Practical - 7 hours

 

SFTY 1103 (Transportation of Dangerous Goods Initial (Road))

 

This course is designed to provide training for all persons involved in the Handling, Offering for Transport, and/or Transporting of Dangerous Goods.

 

Introduction to TDG, Classification, Shipping Document, Safety Marks, Containers, Special Situations, Emergency Actions.

 

Duration - 6 hours

 

SFTY 1104 (WHMIS)

 

This is an introductory course designed to inform students about the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS).

 

Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System; Regulations; Chemical Hazards; Labelling; Material Safety Data Sheets; Confidential Information.

 

Duration - 4 hours

 

SFTY 1105 (MED C - Officer Certification)

 

This Marine Emergency Duties course is designed for junior officers and key personnel. It gives the student the knowledge and skills necessary to inspect, maintain, and effectively utilize their equipment to resend to any shipboard emergency. The course is approved by Transport Canada and meets the international convention on standards of training certification and watchkeeping for seafarers (STCW 1978). Deck officers and engineering officers requiring a Continued Proficiency Endorsement are required to complete this course.

 

Fixed Fire Detection and Extinguishing Systems; Inspection and Maintenance of Emergency Equipment; Response of Bridge, Deck, and Engine Room Watch to Emergencies; Emergency Response Team Leadership; Firefighting On-scene Leader Plan of Attack; Incident Reporting; Crowd Management; Search and Rescue; Internal Communications; Conduct of Training Sessions.

 

Prerequisite - Successful completion of Marine Emergency Duties Training Course SFTY 1110 (B1-Survival Craft), and Marine Emergency Duties Training SFTY 1111 (B2 - Marine Firefighting) within the past five years (Recommendation)

 

Duration - 21 hours

 

Theory - 16 hours

 

Practical - 5 hours

 

SFTY 1106 (Marine Advanced First Aid (STCW A-VI/4-1)

 

This is an advanced first aid training course for seafarers that meets IMO: STCW Regulation VI/4 and STCW Code Section A-VI/4, and requirements under TP 13008 Training Standards for Marine First Aid and Marine Medical Care. This course is designed for seafarers who would apply immediate advanced first aid in the event of an accident or illness onboard a vessel.

 

Immediate Action, First-Aid Kit, Body Structure and Functions, Toxicological Hazards onboard Ship, Examination of Patient, Spinal Injuries, Burns, Scalds and Effects of Heat and Cold, Fractures, Dislocations and Muscular Injuries, Medical Care of Rescued Persons, Including Distress, Hypothermia and Cold exposure, Radio medical Advice, Pharmacology, Sterilization, Cardiac Arrest, Drowning and Asphyxia, Psychological and Psychiatric Problems, Chest, Abdominal, and Pelvic Injuries.

 

Prerequisite - SFTY 1102 (Marine Basic First Aid) or equivalent

 

Duration - 36 hours

 

Theory - 19 hours

 

Practical - 16 hours

 

SFTY 1108 (Marine Emergency Duties - Domestic Vessel Safety (DVS))

 

This course was developed to comply with the requirements of the Marine Personnel Regulations on minimum training in personal survival techniques and fire fighting for Canadian seafarers sailing on board passenger vessels, workboats or fishing vessels engaged on a voyage in Canadian waters.

 

Hazards and Emergencies; Firefighting; Emergency Response; Lifesaving Appliances and Abandonment; Survival; Rescue; Maintenance and Inspection of Emergency Equipment; Passenger Control

 

Prerequisites - Marine Institute approved medical Clearance; A person must be at least 15 years of age to take the DVS course.

 

Duration - 4 days (28 hours)

 

Lecture - 14 hours

 

Practical - 14 hours

 

SFTY 1114 (STCW Basic Safety - Regulations VI/I & Code Section A. VI/I.2)

 

This course meets the requirements of STCW Convention Regulation VI/1 and STCW Code Tables A-VI/1-1, A- VI/1-2 and A-VI/1-4, basic safety training for seafarers as noted in TP 4957 in Marine Personnel Regulations in Basic Safety and in Marine Fire Fighting

 

Hazards and Emergencies; Emergency Response; Lifesaving Appliances and Abandonment; Damage Control and Evacuation; Survival; Rescue; Helicopter Assistance; Maintenance and Inspection of Emergency Equipment; Introduction, Safety and Survival; Concept and Application of the Fire Triangle to Fire and Explosion; Types and Sources of Ignition; Flammable Materials Commonly Found Onboard; Constant Vigilance; Fire Hazards; Organization of Shipboard Fire Fighting; Location of Fire Fighting Appliances and Emergency Escape Routes; Fire Spread in Different Parts of a Ship; Fire and Smoke Detection Measures on Ships and Automatic Alarm Systems; Classification of Fires and Appropriate Extinguishing Agents; Selection of Fire Fighting Appliances and Equipment; Precautions for and Use of Fixed Installations; Maintaining and Inspecting Fire Fighting Equipment; Observe Safe Working Practices; Comply with Emergency Procedures; Take Precautions to Prevent Pollution of the Marine Environment; Contribute to Effective Communications Onboard Ship; Contribute to Effective Human Relationships Onboard Ship; Contribute to Effective Human Relationships Onboard Ship – Social Responsibilities; Understand and Take Necessary Actions to Control Fatigue

 

Prerequisite - A person must be at least 16 years of age to take the STCW Basic Safety course; Marine Institute approved medical clearance; Marine Institute approved fit testing

 

Duration - 46 hours

 

SFTY 1115 (Basic Survival Training)

 

This is a basic course designed to provide personnel with an understanding of the hazards associated with working in an offshore environment, the knowledge and skills necessary to react effectively to offshore emergencies and to care for themselves and others in a survival situation.

 

Hazards, Emergencies and Safety; Emergency Preparedness and Response; Firefighting; Personnel Buoyancy Apparatus; Personal Transfer Devices; Evacuation; Survival Craft and Launching Systems; Survival; Signaling Devices; Search and Rescue; Helicopter Safety and Emergency Procedures.

 

Prerequisite - Medical Clearance in accordance with MI policy

 

Duration - 40.0 hours (5 days)

 

Theory - 17.5 hours

 

Practical - 22.5 hours

 

SFTY 1116 (Tanker Familiarization)

 

This is an introductory level course designed for non-certified ratings so that they may understand the hazards associated with working in a tanker environment. It also provides them with the knowledge required to work safely in this environment. This course meets and/or exceeds the standards set down in Transport Canada TP8129E and STCW 95.

 

Tankers; Cargoes; Toxicity; Hazards; Hazard Control; Personal Safety and Protective Equipment; and Pollution Prevention.

 

Duration - 28.0 hours (4 days)

 

Theory - 24.0 hours

 

Practical - 4.0 hours

 

SFTY 1117 (Survival Craft - STCW’95 V1/2)

 

This course is designed to meet IMO/STCW95 VI/2 Training in Survival Craft and Rescue Boats, other than Fast Rescue Boats, and Canadian requirements under the Marine Personnel Regulations for training of marine personnel. Participants will advance their knowledge of marine survival craft and associated equipment as well as prepare to manage crew and passengers during abandoning of a vessel, surviving at sea, and being rescued.

 

Introduction and Safety; Emergency Situations; Principles of Survival; Use of Personal Survival Equipment; Helicopter Rescue; Survival Craft and Rescue Boats; Launching Arrangements; Lifeboat Engine and Accessories; Evacuation; Signalling Equipment and Pyrotechnics; Action Aboard a Survival Craft; Launching and Recovering Lifeboats; Life Raft Launching; Launching and Handling Survival Craft in Rough Weather; Radio Equipment.

 

Prerequisites - Marine Institute approved medical clearance; SFTY 1108 (A1 – Basic Safety); SFTY 1109 (MED A2 – Small Vessel Safety), or SFTY 1114 (Basic Safety – STCW’95 VI/I)

 

Duration - 28 Hours

 

Lectures - 12 hours

 

Practical Exercises - 16 hours

 

SFTY 1118 (Advanced Firefighting & Officer Certification - STCW’95 VI/3)

 

This is an advanced Marine Fire Fighting course designed to meet STCW Regulation VI/3 Advanced Fire Fighting and requirements under the Canadian Marine Certification Regulations up to the Chief Officer/Second Engineer level.

 

Introduction, Safety and Principles; Training of Seafarers in Fire Fighting; Fire Fighting Process Hazards; Ventilation Control Including Smoke Extraction; Monitoring and Control of Stability During Fire Fighting; Response of Bridge, Deck and Engine Room Watch Officers to Emergencies; Emergency Response Team Leadership; Plan of Attack for On-scene Fire Fighting Leaders; Coordination of Shipboard Fire Fighting; Coordination with Shore-Based Fire Fighters; Management and Control of Injured Persons; Fire Detection and Extinguishing Installations; Inspection and Maintenance of Emergency Equipment; Incident Investigation and Reporting; Crowd Management; Search and Rescue; Communications.

 

Prerequisite - Medical Clearance according to Marine Institute policy; Completion of SFTY 1114 (Basic Safety - STCW’95 VI/I); Completion of SFTY 1117 (Survival Craft - STCW’95 VI/2) or SFTY 1108; SFTY 1110 & SFTY 1111; Marine Institute Approved Fit Testing

 

Duration - 36.5 hours

 

Lecture - 18.5 hours

 

Practical Exercises - 18.0 hours

 

SFTY 1119 (Small Boat Navigation for Seamanship)

 

This course is a combination of two approved short courses - MED A3 (Small Vessel Safety) and Small Vessel Operator - Commercial/Fishing Vessels Training and Certification.

 

SFTY 1120 (Confined Space Awareness)

 

This is an introductory course designed to provide students with an awareness of confined space issues and to familiarize them with self-contained breathing apparatus.

 

Confined Spaces, Detection Equipment, Purging and Ventilating, Entry Procedures, Confined Space Rescue, and Psychological Aspects of a Confined Space, Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus.

 

Duration - 8 hours

 

Theory - 6 hours

 

Practical - 2 hours

 

SFTY 1121 (Equipment and Site Safety)

 

This is an introductory course designed to provide students with an awareness of site safety and to familiarize them with basic site evaluation skills and the equipment used on remediation sites.

 

Occupational Health and Safety Act; The Work Site.

 

Duration - 7 hours

 

SFTY 1123 (Oil and Chemical Tanker Familiarization STCW’95 A-V/1))

 

This course applies to officers and ratings who will be assigned specific duties and responsibilities related to cargo and cargo equipment on oil or chemical tankers, taking into account section A-V/1 of the STCW Code to enable the participants to assume the duties and responsibilities relating to the loading, discharging or transfer of cargo and the operation of cargo equipment.

 

Oil Tanker; Chemical Tanker; Rules and Regulations; Basic Science Concepts; Oil Tanker Cargo Handling Systems; Chemical Tanker Cargo Handling Systems; Oil Tanker Operations; Chemical Tanker Operations; Health, Safety and Emergency Procedures; Pollution Prevention.

 

Prerequisite - SFTY 1114 (Basic Safety STCW ‘95 VI/I) or equivalent; Marine Institute approved Medical Clearance

 

Duration - 60 Hours

 

Theory - 55 hours

 

Practical - 5 hours

 

SFTY 1124 (Confined Space Entry Awareness) - *To be delivered after SFTY 1123

 

This is an introductory course designed to provide students with an awareness of marine confined space issues and to familiarize them with a selection of specialized equipment required for safe entry into confined spaces.

 

Confined Spaces, Atmospheric Assessment, Purging and Ventilating, Entry Procedures, Respiratory Protection, Confined Space Entry Safety Equipment.

 

Duration - 7 hours

 

Theory - 4 hours

 

Practical - 3 hours

 

SFTY 1125 (Small Vessel Operator Proficiency)

 

This course is designed to provide candidates with the skills and knowledge to act as the operator of commercial vessels up to 5 gross tonnage, other than tugs, and fishing vessels, and for fishing vessels up to 15 gross tonnage or 12 meters overall length engaged on a near coastal, class 2 or a sheltered waters voyage. This course has been developed in accordance with the Transport Canada Marine Safety TP 14692 E.

 

Introduction; Terminology; Vessel Hull Types and Configurations; Seamanship; Collision Avoidance Regulations; Stability; Safety on the Job; Marine Weather; Navigation, Positioning Equipment and Installations; Power Boat Operations; Search and Rescue (SAR) Resources; Protection of the Marine Environment; Departure Preparation; Quick Reference Checklists.

 

Duration - 28 hours

 

SFTY 1126M (Standard First Aid with Level C-CPR and AED)

 

An approved training provider will deliver this three-day course.

 

SFTY 1127 (Passenger Safety Management)

 

This course is designed to provide students with standards for familiarization and basic safety training as well as competencies to cope with such hazards and emergencies to the extent appropriate to their functions onboard passenger-carrying vessels. It will also provide seafarers with an understanding of measures to be taken in order to ensure safe operation of passenger-carrying vessels.

 

Introduction; Crowd Management Training; Safety Training for Personnel Providing Direct Service to Passengers in Passenger Space; Passenger Safety Training; Crisis Management and Human Behaviour Training.

 

Duration - 12.5 hours

 

Lectures - 9.5 hours

 

Laboratory - 3 hours

 

SFTY 1128 (Basic Survival Training)

 

This is a basic course designed to provide personnel with an understanding of the hazards associated with working in an offshore environment, the knowledge and skills necessary to react effectively to offshore emergencies and to care for themselves and assist others in a survival situation.

 

Working Offshore; Helicopter Safety & Emergency Procedures; Fire Safety; Abandonment & Survival; Survival Craft; Search & Rescue.

 

Prerequisite - Marine Institute approved medical clearance

 

Duration - 40 hours (5 days)

 

Theory - 17.5 hours

 

Practical - 22.5 hours

 

SFTY 1129 (Security Awareness Training for Seafarers with Designated Security Duties)

 

This course provides knowledge to those who may be designated to perform the duties and responsibilities of seafarers with designated security responsibilities, as defined in Table A-VI/6-2 of the STCW Code, and Section 213 of the Canadian MTSR, and in particular the duties and responsibilities with respect to assisting the Vessel Security Officer in enhancing the security of a vessel.

 

Introduction; Maritime Security Policy; Security Responsibilities; Ship Security Assessment; Security Equipment; Threat Identification, Recognition and Response; Vessel Security Actions; Emergency Preparedness, Drills, and Exercises; Security Administration.

 

Lectures - 9.5 hours

 

Practical - 2.0 hours

 

Exam - 1.0 hours

 

Total - 12.5 hours

 

SFTY 1130 (Introduction to Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG))

 

This is an introductory course designed to provide students with an awareness and understanding of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act and Regulations and the classifications, shipping requirements, safety requirements, and emergency measures and actions needed in the transportation of dangerous goods in Canada.

 

Introduction to TDG; Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act; TDG Regulations; Manual Layout; Classification; Documentation; Dangerous Goods Safety Marks; Means of Containment; Training Requirements; Emergency Actions; Transportation Modes /Inspectors.

 

Duration - 2 days (14 hours Lecture)

 

SFTY 1134 (Security Awareness Training for Seafarers without Designated Security Duties)

 

This course provides knowledge and familiarization awareness training to all persons employed or engaged on a seagoing vessel compliant with the requirements of the ISPS Code, other than passengers, as defined in Table A-VI/6-1 of the STCW Code, and section 214 of the Canadian MTSR, and in particular the duties and responsibilities with respect to assisting the Vessel Security Officer in enhancing the security of a vessel.

 

Introduction; Maritime Security Policy; Security Responsibilities; Threat Identification, Recognition, and Response; Vessel Security Actions; Emergency Preparedness, Drills, and Exercises.

 

Prerequisite - None

 

Duration - 6.0 hours

 

Lectures - 5.25 hours

 

Test - 0.75 hours

 

SFTY 1135 (Practical Boat Handling Skills)

 

This course is designed to enable students to gain practical experience in handling a small boat on the water.

 

Basic Procedures; Manoeuvering Procedures; Un-docking a Boat; Docking a Boat; Retrieving an Object from the Water; Anchoring a Boat.

 

Co-requisite - SFTY 1125 (Small Vessel Operator Proficiency)

 

NOTE: SFTY 1125 is listed as a co-requisite to allow for students to resister for both courses in the same semester, however, SFTY 1125 must be completed prior to starting this course.

 

Duration - Two 3.5 hour sessions (7 hours total)

 

SFTY 1137 (Fall Protection (Offshore))

 

This course will enable the participant to identify and safely use the proper equipment for fall protection in the workplace. This course has been designed to meet the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) Guidelines for Fall Protection Training.

 

Fall Protection Regulations and Standards; Fall Protection and Fall Arrest Systems; Components of a Fall Arrest System; Inspection and Maintenance of a Fall Arrest System; Donning of a Fall Arrest Harness; Ladders and Rescue Considerations

 

Duration: 7 hours

 

Theory: 5 hours

 

Practical: 2 hours

 

SFTY 2100 (Small Craft Safety & Boat Handling)

 

This is an introductory course in the principles and practices of small boat safety and handling.

 

Boat Safety; Legislation; Safety Equipment; Stability; Deckwork; Towing; Emergency Procedures.

 

Duration - 35 hours

 

SFTY 2101 (H2S ALIVE)

 

Information will be distributed by the instructor.

 

H2S Alive Petroleum Industry Training Service Certificate.

 

SFTY 2102 (MED A3 - Marine Emergency Duties for Small Vessels)

 

This is a marine emergency duties course designed for crew members of non-pleasure vessels of not more than 150GT which operate not more than 20 miles from shore.

 

Introduction and Course Safety; Hazards and Emergencies; Emergency Prevention, Preparedness, and Response; Firefighting; Lifesaving Appliances and Abandoning; Survival; Signalling; Rescue.

 

Duration - 14 hours

 

Lecture - 10 hours

 

Practical - 4 hours

 

SFTY 2200 (Small Boat Navigation for Cruise Planning)

 

This course is designed to enable participants to understand and apply the fundamental principles of coastal navigation for small boats.

 

The Coordinate System; Basic Tools of the Trade; Compass Work; Chartwork Skills; Global Positioning System; Publications; Cruise Planning.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1100

 

Duration - 30 hours

 

SFTY 2201 (Boating - Practical Skills)

 

This course is designed to enable participants to develop and apply fundamental practical skills for use with small boats.

 

Basic Tools of the Trade; Compass Work; Chartwork Skills; Global Positioning System; Cruise Planning; Knots and Basic Splicing.

 

Duration - 26 hours (2 hours lab per week)

 

SFTY 2300 (Small Boat Navigation for Marine Sampling)

 

This course is designed to enable participants to apply the fundamental principles of basic coastal navigation to the operation of a small boat in coastal marine waters while sampling.

 

Cruise Planning; Electronic Instrument Set-up; Pre-departure Checks; Passage Monitoring; Station Keeping.

 

Prerequisite - SFTY 2201 (Boating Practical Skills)

 

Duration - 35 hours

 

SFTY 2301 (Fall Protection)

 

This course will enable the participant to identify and safely use the proper equipment for fall protection in the workplace. This course will meet the Fall Protection Certification Training Standard for Workplace Health and Safety Compensation Commission (WHSCC).

 

Fall Protection Regulations and Standards, Fall Protection and Fall Arrest Systems, Components of a Fall Arrest System, Inspection of a Fall Arrest System, Assembly and Donning of a Fall Arrest System, Fall Protection Plan, Fall Protection System and Forces and Calculations, Accident/Incident investigation, Rescue Considerations; Case Studies.

 

Duration - 16 hours

 

Theory - 8 hours

 

Practical - 8 hours

 

SMALL VESSEL OPERATOR - Commercial/Fishing Vessels Training and Certification

 

This course is designed to provide candidates with the skills and knowledge to act as operator of a small commercial or fishing vessel in conformation with regulations of Transport Canada Marine Safety.

 

Introduction; Terminology; Vessel Hull Types and Configurations; Seamanship; Collision Avoidance Regulations; Stability; Safety on the Job; Marine Weather; Navigation, Positioning Equipment and Installations; Power Boat Operations; Search and Rescue Resources; Protection of the Marine Environment; Departure Preparation; Quick Reference Checklists.

 

STAT 2108 (Applied Statistics)

 

This course is designed to provide the student with a working knowledge of descriptive statistics and the statistical treatment and interpretation of data.

 

Sampling; Methods for Describing Sets of Data; Probability and Binomial Distribution; Normal Distribution; Inferences Based on a Single Sample: Estimation; Statistical Inference: Tests of Hypothesis; Analysis of Variance; Simple Linear Regression.

 

Prerequisite - MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus)

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 26 hours

 

STAT 4102 (Statistics for Coastal Zone Management)

 

This course will provide the participants with the necessary statistical tools for decision making in Coastal Zone Management.

 

Descriptive Statistics; Data Collection and Surveys; Statistical Inference.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week

 

STAT 4103 (Statistics - Water Quality)

 

This is a course designed to familiarize students with modern statistical methods and guidelines for the analysis of water quality/ biological data.

 

Introduction; Numerical Methods for Describing Sets of Data; Exploratory and Graphical Data Analysis; Probability and Probability Distributions; Inferences Based on a Single Sample: Point Estimation; Statistical Inference: Tests of Hypothesis; Analysis of Variance: One-Factor; Analysis of Variance: Two-Factors; Regression and Correlation.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours per week = 39 total hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours once per week = 26 total hours

 

STAT 4105 (Statistics - Aquaculture)

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with modern statistical methods and guidelines for the analysis of aquaculture/ecological data.

 

Introduction; Numerical Methods for Describing Sets of Data; Exploratory/Graphical Data Analysis; Probability and Probability Distributions; Inferences Based on a Single Sample: Point Estimation; Statistical Inference: Tests of Hypotheses; Analysis of Variance: One-Factor; Analysis of Variance: Two-Factors; Regression and Correlation.

 

Prerequisite - One university or college level introductory statistic course, or equivalent

 

Lectures - 39 hours (3 hours per week)

 

Laboratories - 26 hours (2 hours per week)

 

STAT 4106 (Applied Statistics for Food Safety)

 

This is course is designed to familiarize students with modern statistical methods and guidelines for the analysis of food safety/production data and to provide an introduction to statistical process control methods.

 

Introduction; Numerical Methods for Describing Sets of Data; Normal Distributions; Inferences Based on a Single Sample: Point Estimation; Statistical Inference: Tests of Hypotheses; Analysis of Variance; Regression and Correlation; Discrete Probability Distributions; Acceptance Sampling; Statistical Process Control.

 

Prerequisite - One university or college level introductory statistics course, or equivalent

 

Lectures - 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 26 hours

 

STWK 0107 (Welding Theory I)

 

This introductory course is designed to familiarize the student with the theoretical aspects of welding.

 

Introduction to Trade; Safety; Oxy-Fuel Cutting, Fusion, Brazing and Braze Welding (Oxy-Fuel); SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) I; Build up of Metal Parts; SMAW II – Fillet Weld Flat and Horizontal (Part 1); Metallurgy, Expansion and Contraction Control; Jigs and Fixture Fabrication.

 

Co-requisites - STWK 0108 (Fabrication Theory I); WKPR 0107 (Welding and Fitting Shop)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

STWK 0108 (Fabrication Theory I)

 

This introductory course is designed to familiarize the student with the theoretical aspects of steel fabrication.

 

Offshore Fabrication Work Environment; Safety Requirements; Structural Steel; Hand Measuring and Layout Tools; Procedures Used To Fabricate Various Structural Shapes; Hand and Power Cutting Tools; Drilling and Threading Tools; Grinding and Finishing; Bending and Rolling; Stationary Powered Shearing; Iron Worker Operation

 

Co-requisites - STWK 0107 (Welding Theory I); WKPR 0107 (Welding and Fitting Shop I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

STWK 0207 (Welding Theory II)

 

This intermediate level course is designed to enhance the student’s theoretical knowledge in offshore welding.

 

SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) Groove Weld All Positions; Procedures To Test Welds; Weld Faults; Fillet and Groove Welds on Medium and High Carbon Steel; Plasma Arc Cutting and Gouging.

 

Prerequisite - STWK 0107 (Welding Theory I); STWK 0108 (Fabrication Theory I); WKPR 0107 (Welding and Fitting Shop I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2/0

 

STWK 0208 (Fabrication Theory II)

 

This intermediate level course is designed to enhance the student’s theoretical knowledge in offshore steel fabrication.

 

Code and Standards; Heat Treatment; Quality Control and Quality Assurance.

 

Prerequisite - STWK 0107 (Welding Theory I); STWK 0108 (Fabrication Theory I); WKPR 0107 (Welding and Fitting Shop I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2/0

 

STWK 0300 (Introduction to Apprenticeship)

 

This course is designed to give participants the knowledge base and skills necessary to understand and successfully navigate the Apprentice/Red Seal Program.

 

Apprenticeship Defined; How Apprenticeship is Governed and Administered; Roles and Responsibilities of Those People Involved in the Apprenticeship Process; Steps in the Apprenticeship Program; Training and Education Requirements; Plans of Training; Red Seal Program; Apprenticeship Progression Schedule; Apprenticeship Evaluation Process; Financial Incentives Available to Apprentices; Continuing Apprentice Training Outside Province of NL; Definitions.

 

Prerequisite- Successful completion of all courses in Term 1 and Term 2

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 3/0

 

TKPR 3100A/B (Technological Project)

 

The Technological Project is a linked course; TKPR 3100B must be completed in the technical Session immediately following TKPR 3100A, and TKPR 3100C must be completed in the next academic term after TKPR 3100B. The course is designed for advanced Marine Engineering Technology students to demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills developed throughout the program.

 

Deign Morphology; Project Selection; Problem Identification; Project Research and Planning; Project Proposal; Project Performance; Project Analysis; Project Reporting and Presentation.

 

Prerequisites - TKPR 3100A: Successful completion of CMSK 1201 (Communication at Work); MREK 2107 (Marine Engineering Knowledge); MREK 2207 (Marine Engineering Knowledge); WKPR 1106 (Fitting Shop); WKPR 1107 (Welding Shop); WKPR 1108 (Machine Shop); WKPR 2104 (Fitting Shop); WKPR 2107 (Welding Shop); WKPR 2108 (Machine Shop) and WKPR 3100 (Machinery Maintenance Shop)

 

TKPR 3100B - Successful completion of TKPR 3100A
TKPR 3100C - Successful completion of TKPR 3100B

 

Duration -
TKPR 3100A - 13 Weeks
Lecture/Lab - 1/2

 

TKPR 3100B - 5 weeks
Lecture/Lab - 1/2

 

TKPR 3100C - 13 Weeks
Lecture/Lab - 1/2

 

TKPR 3106A/B (Technical Project - Food Technology)

 

This course provides students with the opportunity to design, implement and report on a technical project with potential benefits to the Canadian food processing industry.This is a linked course - TKPR 3106B must be completed in the academic term immediately following completion of TKPR 3106A.

 

Identification of Potential Projects; Project Selection; Design and Analysis; Implementation; Reporting.

 

Prerequisites - TKPR 3106A - BIOL 2202 (Food Microbiology); CMSK 2102 (Interpersonal Communications); STAT 2108 (Applied Statistics); FDTE 2107 (Food Processing I); QLAS 2104 (Food Evaluation)

 

Co-requisites - CHEM 3100 (Chemistry); FDTE 3100 (Food Engineering - Unit Operations); FDTE 3107 (Food Processing II)

 

Prerequisites - TKPR 3106B - TKPR 3106A

 

Duration -
TKPR 3106A - 39 hours
TKRP 3106B - 78 hours

 

TKPR 3108 (Advanced Technical Report Writing)

 

The technical report completed in this course enables students to work in groups and carry out an in-depth study of a problem, design, technological application or current issue related to the maritime sector. They will fully document and present their findings in a technical report and presentation.

 

Technical Reporting Fundamentals; Research Topic Selection; Teamwork and Group (Committee) Dynamics; Report Development; Report Presentation Development.

 

Prerequisites - CMSK 1201 (Technical Communications II); WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

TKPR 310A/310B (Technological Project - Marine Engineering Technology)

 

The Technological Project is a linked course; TKPR 310B must be completed in the following academic term after TKPR 310A. The course is designed for advanced Marine Engineering Technology students to demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills developed throughout the program.

 

Design Morphology; Project Selection; Problem Identification; Project Research and Planning; Project Proposal; Project Performance; Project Analysis; Project Reporting and Presentation.

 

Prerequisite - TKPR 310A: Successful completion of CMSK 1201 (Communication at Work); MREK 3106 (Marine Engineering Knowledge); WKPR 2113 (Welding Shop), WKPR 2116 (Fitting Shop), WKPR 2217 (Machine Shop), WKTM 1103 (Work Term 1), and WKPR 3101 (Machinery Maintenance Shop)

 

TKPR 310B - Successful completion of TKPR 310A

 

Duration - TKPR 310A - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour per week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours per week

 

Duration - TKPR 310B - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour per week

 

Laboratories - 2 hours per week

 

TKPR 312A/312B (Technological Thesis - Marine Environmental)

 

The technological thesis enables the student completing a Diploma Program to demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills developed throughout the program. Students taking this course will work independently on a project under the supervision of a faculty advisory committee. They will carry out an in-depth study of a problem, design or technological application, and fully document and present their findings. This is a linked course – TKPR 312B must be completed in the academic term immediately following completion of TKPR 312A.

 

Problem Solving and the Engineering Design Process; Managing and Planning Environmental Projects; Project Identification; Project Analysis; Project Research and Documentation; Progress Report (Oral and Written); Draft of Project Report; Final Report Presentation; and Oral Report Presentation.

 

Prerequisites - TKPR 312A - Successful Completion of all Term 3 and Term 4 Courses EXCEPT MATH 1200

 

TKPR 312B - TKPR 312A

 

Duration - TKPR 312A - 13 weeks
Lectures - 5 hours/week

 

Duration - TKPR 312B - 13 weeks
Lectures - 5 hours/week

 

TKPR 317A/317B (Technological Thesis - Nautical Science Technology)

 

The technological project is a linked course; TKPR 317B must be completed in the academic term immediately following TKPR 317A. The project completed in this linked course enables the student to utilize knowledge and skills developed throughout the diploma program.

 

Students taking this course will work as a group on a project, under the supervision of a faculty advisory committee. They will carry out an in-depth study of a problem, design, technological application or current issue related to the marine industry, and fully document and present their findings.

 

Project Identification; Teamwork and Group Dynamics; Project Analysis; Project Research and Documentation; Project Presentation.

 

Prerequisite - TKPR 317A - Successful completion of Sea Phase 1, TS1 and TS2, and CMSK 1201

 

TKPR 317B - Successful completion of TKPR 317A and WKTM 2102

 

Duration - TKPR 317A - 13 weeks
Lecture - 2 hours per week
Laboratories - 2 hours per week

 

Duration - TKPR 317B - 13 weeks
Lecture - 1 hour per week
Laboratories - 3 hours per week

 

TKPR 3500 (Electro-mechanical Fabrication Project)

 

This course is designed for advanced level students to demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills developed throughout the program.

 

Design Morphology; Project Selection; Problem Identification; Project Research and Planning; Project Proposal; Preparation for Equipment and/or Material; Project Performance; Project Analysis; Project Reporting and Presentation.

 

Prerequisites -

 

BTech (OI):

 

CMSK 1104 (Introduction to Technical Reporting); ELTR 1104 (Electronic Fabrication Techniques); WKPR 2301 (Fitting Shop); CNTL 3105 (Instrumentation, Controls and Automation); CNTL 3201(Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers - PLCs); ELTR 2214 (Microcomputer Interfacing); and ELTR 2107 (Electronic Troubleshooting)

 

BTech (UV):

 

CMSK 1104 (Introduction to Technical Reporting; ELTR 1104 (Electronic Fabrication Techniques); WKPR 1117 (Machine Shop); ROVO 3200 (AUV Design and Operations); ELTR 3211 (Control Devices & Systems); ELTR 3104 (Digital Signal Processing); and ELTK 2200 (Marine Electrical Troubleshooting)

 

Duration - 13 weeks Lecture/Lab: 1/2

 

Lectures - 1 hour per week = 13 total hours

 

Laboratories - 4 hour once per week = 52 total hours

 

TKPR 411A/411B (Technical Project - Sustainable Aquaculture)

 

This course provides students the opportunity to design, implement, and report on a research project with potential benefits to the aquaculture industry. This is a linked course – TKPR 411B must be completed in the academic term immediately following completion of TKPR 411A.

 

Identification of Potential Projects; Project Selection; Design and Analysis; Implementation; Reporting.

 

Prerequisites - TKPR 411A - None
TKPR 411B - TKPR 411A

 

Duration - TKPR 411A - 13 weeks
Lectures - 1 hour per week = 13 hours total

 

Duration - TKPR 411B - 13 weeks
Lectures - 11 hours per week = 143 hours total

 

TKPR 413A/413B (Technical Project - Food Safety)

 

This course provides students the opportunity to design, implement, and report on a technical project with potential benefits to the Canadian food processing industry. This is a linked course – TKPR 413B must be completed in the academic term immediately following completion of TKPR 413A.

 

Identification of Potential Projects; Project Selection; Design and Analysis; Implementation; Reporting.

 

Prerequisites - TKPR 413A - None
TKPR 413B - TKPR 413A

 

Duration - TKPR 413A - 13 weeks
Lectures - 2 hours per week = 26 hours total

 

Duration - TKPR 413B - 13 weeks
Other Requirements - 13 hours per week = 169 hours total

 

TKPR 415A/415B/415C (Technical Project - Water Quality)

 

This course provides students the opportunity to design, implement, and report on a technical project related to various aspects associated with water and water use. This is a linked course – TKPR 415A/B/C must be completed sequentially in the same academic year.

 

Identification of Potential Projects; Project Selection; Design and Analysis; Implementation; Reporting.

 

Prerequisites - TKPR 415A - None
TKPR 415B - TKPR 415A
TKPR 415C - TKPR 415B

 

Duration - TKPR 415A - 6 weeks
Lectures - 2 hours per week = 12 hours total

 

Duration - TKPR 415B - 13 weeks
Other Requirements - 3 hours per week = 39 hours total

 

Duration - TKPR 415C - 5 weeks
Other Requirements - 15 hours per week = 75 hours total

 

TRMO 2100 (Thermodynamics)

 

This is an introductory course in thermodynamics. The course will provide the student with the basics of thermodynamics and its application to various processes.

 

Introduction to Thermodynamics; First Law and Applications; Second Law and Applications; Gas Laws; Processes; Gas Power Cycles.

 

Prerequisite - PHYS 1101 (Physics) or PHYS 1100 (Physics); MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus) or MATH 1102 (Pre-Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

TRMO 2105 (Thermodynamics)

 

This is an introductory course in thermodynamics. The course will provide the student with the basics of thermodynamics and its application to various processes.

 

Introduction to Thermodynamics; First Law and Applications; Second Law and Applications; Gas Laws; Processes; Gas Power Cycles.

 

Prerequisite - PHYS 1103 (Physics); MATH 1100 (Pre-Calculus)

 

Duration - 13 weeks instruction, exclusive of final examination

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 13 hours total

 

TRMO 2200 (Thermodynamics)

 

This course follows from TRMO 2100 and applies the knowledge obtained in that course to specific mechanical systems. These applications are ones which the mechanical engineering technologist is likely to use in his or her future work.

 

Steam; Internal Combustion Engines; Combustion.

 

Prerequisite - TRMO 2100 (Thermodynamics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

TRMO 2204 (Thermodynamics)

 

This course follows from TRMO 2100 (Thermodynamics) and applies the knowledge obtained in that course to specific mechanical systems. These applications are ones which the mechanical engineering technologist is likely to use in his or her future work.

 

Steam; Internal Combustion Engines; Combustion.

 

Prerequisite - TRMO 2105 (Thermodynamics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 13 hours

 

TRMO 3101 (Applied Thermodynamics - Refrigeration/Air Conditioning)

 

This is both a theory and practical course in the topic of refrigeration and air conditioning. It should draw on knowledge gained in Thermodynamics in the specific application refrigeration.

 

Refrigeration Cycles; Refrigeration Processes-Thermodynamics; Refrigerants-Properties; System Analysis; Component Analysis; Psychrometry; Air Conditioning Processes.

 

Prerequisite - TRMO 2100 (Thermodynamics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week every second week for 6 labs = 12 hours

 

OR

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 7 hours/week = 42 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/week every second week for 6 labs = 12 hours

 

TRMO 3103 (Thermodynamics)

 

This course is an intermediate level course following TRMO 2100 and 2200 with specific applications to systems in the marine industry.

 

Air Compressors; Steam Turbines; Gas Turbines; Heat Transfer; Heat Exchangers.

 

Prerequisite - TRMO 2100 (Thermodynamics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week

 

TRMO 3106 (Applied Thermodynamics - Refrigeration/Air Conditioning)

 

This is both a theory and practical course in the topic of refrigeration and air conditioning. It should draw on knowledge gained in Thermodynamics in the specific application refrigeration.

 

Refrigeration Cycles; Refrigeration Processes-Thermodynamics; Refrigerants-Properties; System Analysis; Component Analysis; Psychrometry; Air Conditioning Processes.

 

Prerequisite - TRMO 2105 (Thermodynamics)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 8 hours/week = 40 hours

 

Laboratories - 2 hours/ week every week for 5 labs = 10 hours

 

TRMO 3107 (Thermodynamics)

 

This course is an intermediate level course following TRMO 2100 (Thermodynamics) and TRMO 2200 (Thermodynamics) with specific applications to systems in the marine industry.

 

Air Compressors; Steam Turbines; Gas Turbines; Heat Transfer; Heat Exchangers.

 

Prerequisite - TRMO 2105 (Thermodynamics)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 3 hours/week = 39 hours

 

Laboratories - 1 hour/week = 13 hours

 

WKPR 0100 (Fitting Shop)

 

This is an introductory fitting shop course designed to introduce the student to fitting shop safety, terminology, and machinery and to provide hands-on experience with the hand and power tools used in a fitting shop.

 

Fitting Shop Safety; Layout and Layout Tools; Selection, Care, and the Use of Files; Selection, Care, and the Use of Hacksaws; Drills and Drill Presses; Selection and the Use of Taps; Selection and the Use of Dies; and Metrology.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour/week = 13 hours total

 

Practical Exercises - 2 hours/week = 26 hours total

 

WKPR 0103 (Welding Shop)

 

This is an introductory welding course designed to introduce the student to welding shop safety, terminology, and tools and equipment and to provide hands-on experience with the welding tools and equipment used in a welding shop.

 

Safety; Oxy-Acetylene Equipment Orientation and Set-Up; Operating Oxy-Acetylene Cutting Equipment; Oxy-Acetylene Fusion Welding; Oxy-Acetylene Non-Fusion (Brazing); Shielded Metal Arc Welding; and Testing.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Shop - 4 hours/week

 

WKPR 0107 (Welding and Fitting Shop I)

 

This introductory course is designed to give the student hands-on experience with the practical aspects of welding and fitting.

 

Offshore Fabrication Work Environment; Safety Requirements; Structural Steel; Hand Measuring and Layout Tools; Procedures used to Fabricate using Various Structural Shapes; Hand and Power Cutting Tools; Drilling and Threading Tools; Grinding and Finishing; Bending and Rolling; Stationary Powered Shearing; Iron Worker Operation; Oxy-Fuel Cutting, Heating and Gouging; Fusion, Brazing and Braze Welding; SMAW I (Shielded Metal Arc Welding); Build-up of Metal Parts; SMAW II (Fillet Weld Flat and Horizontal; Metallurgy, Expansion and Contraction Control; Jigs and Fixture Fabrication.

 

Co-requisite - STWK 0108 (Fabrication Theory I); STWK 0107 (Welding Theory I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Laboratories - 21 hours/week

 

WKPR 0200 (Machine Shop)

 

This course is designed to add to, and further develop the skills acquired in WKPR 0100. The student will be given instruction and hands-on experience in the use of machine shop machinery and methods.

 

Lathe Components and Their Functions; Use, Care, and Maintenance of the Lathe; Use, Care, and Maintenance of Pedestal and Bench Grinders; HSS and Carbide Tool Bit Terminology and Geometry; HSS Tool Bit Grinding; and Sawing Machines.

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 0100 (Machine Shop)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Practical Exercises - 4 hours/week - 52 hours total

 

WKPR 0207 (Welding and Fitting Shop II)

 

This intermediate course is designed to enhance the student’s practical knowledge of offshore steel fabrication.

 

Air Carbon Arc Cutting and Goughing; Procedures Used To Remove A Weld From A Joint Using ACA (Air Carbon Arc) Process; GMAW 2 – Fillet Weld All Positions, Mild Steel; GMAW 3 – Groove Weld All Positions, Mild Steel; FCAW (Flux Cored Arc Welding) I – Set-Up and Deposit A Weld; Assembly and Disassembly of FCAW Equipment; Troubleshooting and Maintenance Procedures For FCAW Equipment; FCAW 2 – Fillet and Groove Weld Plate (All Positions); Procedures Used To Weld Plate In All Positions Using Flux Cored Wire; Various Gases and Gas Mixtures; Weld Faults and Their Causes; Procedures Used To Test Welds; GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) I – Set-Up; Procedures Used To Establish and Maintain An Arc; Procedures Used To Test Welds; Quality Control; Heat Treatment; Quality Control and Quality Assurance.

 

Prerequisite - STWK 0107 (Welding Theory I); STWK 0108 (Fabrication Theory I); WKPR 0107 (Welding and Fitting Shop I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Laboratory - 0/17

 

WKPR 0300 (TIG Welding)

 

This introductory level course is designed to familiarize the student with the practical aspects of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW).

 

Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) 2 – Fillet Weld All Positions, Mild Steel; Principles and Applications; GTAW Process; Fillet Welds on Tee Joints in all Positions; Procedures Used to Test Welds; Weld Faults.

 

Prerequisite - Successful completion of all courses in Term 1 and Term 2

 

Duration - 5 weeks Labs - 0/6

 

WKPR 1103 (Fitting Shop)

 

This is a pre-employment skills training course designed to teach the student to identify and to select the proper tools for a given application. The student will also learn the safe and proper use of tools.

 

Hand Tools; Wrenches; Special Tools; Precision Tools; Gasket Making; Value Stem Packing; Metal Shaping.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Laboratory - 4 hours/week

 

WKPR 1104 (Machine Shop)

 

This is an introductory course designed to give instruction and hands-on practice in metrology, basic lathe operations, and the use and maintenance of bench girders.

 

Introduction to Machine Shop; Lathe Components and their Functions; Use, Care, and Maintenance of the Lathe; Use, Care, and Maintenance of Bench and Pedestal Grinders; HSS and Carbide Tool Bit Terminology and Geometry; HSS Tool Grinding; Spindle Nose Tooling; Methods of Chucking; Metrology; Machining of 60 Degree External and Internal Unified Thread; Thread Terminology.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week

 

WKPR 1106 (Fitting Shop)

 

This is a pre-employment skills training course designed to teach the student to identify and to select the proper tools for a given application. The student will also learn the safe and proper use of tools.

 

Hand Tools; Wrenches; Copper Tubing; Gasket Making; Value Stem Packing; Piping; Metal Shaping.

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour/week

 

Laboratory - 7 hours/week

 

WKPR 1107 (Welding Shop)

 

This course is designed to provide students with step-by-step theoretical welding instruction and applications to permit them to develop practical skills in a welding ship environment. As the level of training progresses, students are shown how their newly developed skills can be used in repair techniques.

 

Welding Safety; Oxygen Acetylene Cutting; Oxygen-Acetylene Welding; Oxygen-Acetylene Brazing; Testing.

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour/week

 

Laboratory - 7 hours/week

 

WKPR 1108 (Machine Shop)

 

This is an introductory course designed to give instruction and hands-on practice in metrology, basic lathe operations, and the use and maintenance of bench grinders.

 

Introduction to Machine Shop; Lathe Components and Their Functions; Use, Care, and Maintenance of the Lathe; Use, Care, and Maintenance of Bench and Pedestal Grinders; HSS and Carbide Tool Bit Terminology and Geometry; HSS Tool Grinding; Spandex Nose Tooling; Methods of Chucking; Metrology; Machining of 60-degree External and Internal Unified Thread; Thread Terminology.

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour/week

 

Laboratory - 7 hours/week

 

WKPR 1109 (Welding Shop I)

 

This course is designed to provide students with theoretical and practical oxygen/acetylene gas cutting and welding skills suitable for the marine environment.

 

Welding Safety; Oxygen-Acetylene Cutting; Oxygen-Acetylene Welding; Oxygen-Acetylene Brazing.

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lecture - 1 hour/week

 

Laboratories - 7 hours/week

 

WKPR 1110 (Fitting Shop I)

 

This is a skills training course designed to teach the student how to identify, select and safely use proper tools for given applications.

 

Shop Safety; Hand Tools and Wrenches; Electric and Pneumatic Hand Tools; Metrology,;Copper Pipe and Tubing; Joints, Gaskets and Sealants.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 0 hours a week = 0 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours a week = 39 hours total

 

WKPR 1117 (Machine Shop I)

 

This is an introductory skills training course designed to give the student instruction and hands-on practice in basic lathe operations and bench grinders.

 

Introduction to Machine Shop; Lathe Components and their Functions; Use, Care, and Maintenance of the Lathe; Use, Care, and Maintenance of Bench and Pedestal Grinders; HSS and Carbide Tool Bit Terminology and Geometry; HSS Tool Grinding; Spindle Nose Tooling; Methods of Chucking; Machining 60-degree External and Internal Unified Thread; Thread Terminology.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 0 hours/week = 0 hours total

 

Laboratory - 4 hours/week = 52 hours total

 

WKPR 1200 (Fitting Shop II)

 

This is a skills-training course designed to give the student practice identifying and selecting tools for given applications. The student will practice using these tools safely and properly on shop projects.

 

Stationary Workshop Tools, Metal Fasteners, Piping, Alignment, Pressure Gauges,

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 1110 (Fitting Shop I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 0 hours a week = 0 hours total

 

Laboratories - 3 hours a week = 39 hours total

 

WKPR 1306 (Computer Integrated Fabrication)

 

This course is designed to develop the skills necessary for the student to produce three dimensional Computer Aided Design (CAD) part and assembly models. The course will also develop the necessary skills for fabricating the models using 3D printers, Computer Numerical Control (CNC) milling machines and CNC lathes via Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software.

 

3D Modeling; Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing); CAD/CAM Machining

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Laboratories - three 2-hour labs per week = 36 hours total

 

WKPR 2104 (Fitting Shop)

 

This is a pre-employment skills training course designed to give the student practice in identifying and selecting the proper tools for a given application. The students will also practice the safe and proper use of these tools.

 

Special Tools; Metal Fasteners; Rigging; Minor Overhaul and Repair.

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 1106 (Fitting Shop) or equivalent

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour/week

 

Laboratory - 7 hours/week

 

WKPR 2107 (Welding Shop)

 

This course is designed to give the student fundamental theoretical knowledge and to develop practical skills in electric arc welding.

 

Welding Safety; Metal Preparation; Electrode Selection; Welding Processes; Metallurgy of Welds; Welding Positions; Electric Arc Welding Processes; Destructive/Non-Destructive Testing.

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 1107 (Welding Shop) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Shop Work - 6 hours/week

 

WKPR 2108 (Machine Shop)

 

This course is designed to add to, and to further develop skills acquired in WKPR 1108 (Machine Shop). The student will be given instruction and hands-on practice in the speeds and feeds for various machining operations, cutting fluids, power saws, drills and drilling (lathe), and taper turning, as well as in the use of steady and follower rests, and other lathe operations such as boring, reaming, knurling, parting, recessing, tapping, milling machine speeds and feeds, indexing head, and machining of spur gears, machine ability of various metals, uses of Acme Threads, machining of Acme Threads, uses of Square Threads, machining of Square Threads, Tool Bit Grinding and Drill Bit Sharpening.

 

Cutting Speeds and Feeds; Cutting Fluids; Sawing Machines; Drills and Drilling (Lathe); Taper Turning; Other Lathe Operations; Use of Steady and Follower Rests; Indexing Heads; Spur Gear Cutting; Machine Ability; Acme Threads; Square Threads; Tool Bit Grinding; Drill Bit Sharpening.

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 1108 (Machine Shop) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 6 hours/week

 

WKPR 2113 (Welding II)

 

This course is designed to provide students with theoretical and practical oxygen/acetylene gas cutting and electric arc welding knowledge that will permit them to develop skills suitable for the marine environment.

 

Welding Safety; Oxygen-Acetylene Cutting; Metal Preparation; Electrode Selection; Welding Processes; Metallurgy of Welds; Welding Positions; Electric Arc Welding Processes.

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 1109 (Welding I) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week for 13 weeks = 52 hours

 

WKPR 2115 (Fitting Shop I)

 

This is a skills training course designed to teach the student how to identify, select and safely use proper tools for given applications.

 

Hand Tools; Wrenches; Copper Tubing; Gasket Making; Value Stem Packing; Piping; Metrology.

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Laboratory - 8 hours/week = 40 hours total

 

WKPR 2116 (Fitting Shop II)

 

This is a skills training course designed to give the student practice in identifying and selecting the tools for a given application. The student will also practice the safe and proper use of these tools in the completion of shop projects.

 

Special Tools; Metal Fasteners; Rigging; Fitting Shop Projects.

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 2115 (Fitting Shop I) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks/4 hours

 

Laboratory - 4 hours/week = 52 hours

 

WKPR 2117 (Machine Shop II)

 

This is a skills training course designed to give instruction and hands-on practice in the safe and efficient use of Machine Shop tools and equipment.

 

Cutting Speeds and Feeds; Cutting Fluids; Sawing Machines; Drills and Drilling (Lathe); Taper Turning; Other Lathe Operations; Use of Steady and Follower Rests; Machine Shop Projects.

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 1117 (Machine Shop I)

 

Duration - 13 weeks/52 hours

 

Shop - 4 hours/week = 52 hours

 

WKPR 2118 (Workshop Practice)

 

This course is designed to provide students with a background in materials and materials processing specifically for ROV operations. Emphasis is placed on the safe, proper and suitable use of tools.

 

Classification of ROV metals (Stainless Steels, Aluminum, and Titanium); Identification of ROV Metals; Properties of ROV Metals; Other ROV Materials; Special Topics; Welding Safety; Oxygen-Acetylene Cutting; Electrode Selection; Welding Processes; Welding Positions; Electric Arc Welding Processes; Hand Tools and Wrenches; Selection, Care and the Use of Files; Drills and Drill Presses; Selection and the Use of Taps and Dies; Metrology; Piping.

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Laboratories - 4 hours/week

 

WKPR 2119 (MESD Workshop Practice)

 

This new course will give the students hands-on appreciation for the physical attributes and function of the machinery employed in the systems that they design in their other courses.

 

Safety; Pumps; Valves and Manifolds; Oily Water Separators; Air Compressors; Heat Exchangers; Purifiers; Boiler Systems.

 

Prerequisite - ENSY 1202 (Introduction to MESD)

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week = 12 hours total

 

Laboratories - 8 hours/week = 48 hours total

 

WKPR 2217 (Machine Shop III)

 

The student will be given instruction and hands-on machining practice in the production of Acme and Square Threads and Machine Shop Projects.

 

Acme Threads; Square Threads; Tool Bit Grinding; Drill Bit Sharpening; Indexing Heads; Spur Gear Cutting; Machinability; Machine Shop Projects.

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 2117 (Machine Shop II) or equivalent

 

Duration - 5 weeks/40 hours

 

Laboratory - 8 hours/week = 40 hours

 

WKPR 2301 (Fitting Shop)

 

This course is designed so the student will be able to carry out various mechanical related jobs in the performance of installing and repairing instrumentation.

 

Safety; Filing and Hack Sawing; Drills and Drill Presses; Use of Taps and Dies; Piping; Soldering of Copper Pipe; Sheet Metal Shaping.

 

Prerequisites - WKPR 2115 (Fitting Shop I)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lecture - 1 hour/week

 

Laboratory - 7 hours/week

 

WKPR 3100 (Machinery Maintenance Shop)

 

This course is designed to give students a knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of machinery maintenance programs, machinery construction and function. In addition, the course will provide hands-on experience with machinery and related equipment.

 

Safety; Gauges; Alignment; Pumps; Air Compressors; Heat Exchangers; Bearings; Burner Fundamentals; Diesel Engines; Maintenance Planning; Maintenance Plans; Scheduling Maintenance.

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 2104 (Fitting Shop)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratories - 6 hours/week

 

WKPR 3101 (Machinery Maintenance I)

 

This course is designed to give students an understanding of shipboard equipment, while providing hands-on maintenance experience with the dismantling, inspection, part replacement and assembly of marine equipment.

 

Safety; Alignment; Pumps; Air Compressors; Heat Exchangers; Bearings; Burner Fundamentals; Diesel Engines.

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 2116 (Fitting Shop II)

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lecture - 1 hour/week

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week

 

WKPR 3106 (Workshop Practice)

 

This course is designed to provide students with a background in materials and materials processing specifically for ROV operations. Emphasis is placed on the safe, proper and suitable use of tools.

 

Classification of ROV metals (Stainless Steels, Aluminum, and Titanium); Identification of ROV Metals; Properties of ROV Metals; Other ROV Materials; Special Topics; Welding Safety; Oxygen-Acetylene Cutting; Electrode Selection; Welding Processes; Welding Positions; Electric Arc Welding Processes; Hand Tools and Wrenches; Selection, Care and the Use of Files; Drills and Drill Presses; Selection and the Use of Taps and Dies; Metrology; Piping.

 

Duration - 3 weeks

 

Laboratories - 19 hours/week

 

WKPR 3200 (Machinery Maintenance Shop)

 

This course is designed to give students a knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of the quality control used with maintenance requirements for marine equipment. In addition, the course will provide hands-on experience with equipment to familiarize the student with the assembly, dismantling, inspection, and part replacement of machinery and related equipment.

 

Safety Relief Valves; Purifiers; Oily Water Separators; Gearing; Steering Systems; Diesel Engines (ICE); Quality Control; Quality Manuals; Quality Specifications.

 

Prerequisites - WKPR 3100 (Machinery Maintenance Shop)

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Lectures - 2 hours/week

 

Laboratory - 6 hours/week

 

WKPR 3204 (Machinery Maintenance II)

 

This course is designed to give students increased understanding of preventative maintenance programs and knowledge of shipboard equipment, while providing hands-on maintenance experience.

Safety Relief Valves; Purifiers; Oily Water Separators; Gearing; Steering Systems; Maintenance Planning; Maintenance Plans; Scheduling Maintenance.

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 3101 (Machinery Maintenance II) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Lectures - 1 hour/week

 

Laboratory - 4 hours/week

 

WKPR 3206 (Welding Shop III)

 

This course is designed to provide students with theoretical and practical oxygen/acetylene gas cutting and welding knowledge that will permit them to enhance welding skills suitable for the marine environment.

 

Welding Safety; Electric Arc Welding Processes; Destructive/Non-Destructive Testing; MIG and TIG Welding.

 

Prerequisite - WKPR 2113 (Welding II) or equivalent

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

Laboratories - 3 hours/week = 39 hours total

 

OR

 

Duration - 5 weeks

 

Laboratories - 8 hours/week = 40 hours total

 

WKTM 0010 (Work Term - Fire Rescue)

 

This course will provide the student with practical work experience and the opportunity to develop the competency required of a Firefighting Recruit.

 

WKTM 0010 (Fire Rescue)

 

Prerequisites - Successful completion of all courses within the program; Successful completion of SERT fitness test; NFPA 1001 Level I; Clear Certificate of Conduct

 

Duration - Students must complete a minimum work term of 384 hours duration.

 

WKTM 0011 (Work Term - Bridge Watch Program)

 

WKTM 0011 provides the student with the necessary practical experience to develop the competency requirements of a bridge watch rating, as outlined by STCW ’95. For most students, the work term represents their first experience in a ship environment. As such, they will be expected to gain an understanding of the vessel’s operation, safety requirements, and discipline.

 

NOTE: To challenge Transport Canada’s Bridge Watchman examination, the student must have accumulated a minimum of 60 days of Transport Canada certified sea time. (Refer to Transport Canada Document: TP2293 “The Examination and Certification of Seafarers.”)

 

Prerequisites - A valid seafarer’s medical certificate is required for all sea based work terms. In addition, the student must have successfully completed all program courses before registering in an approved work term.

 

Duration - The duration of the work term shall normally be sixty days aboard the assigned vessel.

 

WKTM 0100 (Work Term - Marine Diesel Mechanics)

 

WKTM 0100 is designed to ensure that the student gains the practical experience to begin development of the competency requirements of a Ship’s Engine Room Rating or a shore-based Marine Diesel Mechanic with practical applicable knowledge. Each successfully completed work term is regarded as one course credit. To meet the requirements of graduation from the Marine Diesel Mechanics Vocational Certificate Program, the student must have successfully completed WKTM 0100.

 

Prerequisite - MREK 0200 (Marine Engineering Knowledge 0200); BSMG 0202 (Workplace Preparation); SFTY 1114 (Basic Safety - STCW’95 VI/I); SFTY 1117 (Survival Craft - STCW’95 VI/2), and SFTY 1102 (Marine Basic First Aid); Valid Seafarer’s Medical

 

Schedule - Option 1: Sea-based work term

 

Students who are placed in a sea-based work term must complete a minimum of 60 Transport Canada approved calendar days as an engineering cadet signed-on onboard ship, must have documented Transport Canada testimonials of sea service, must present acceptable proof of on-the -job performance using the School of Maritime Studies’ Employer Evaluation form, and must complete the Marine Diesel Mechanics Sea Phase Manual. This will result in graduate eligibility for the Engine Room Rating Certificate.

 

Marine Diesel Mechanics Sea Phase Manual:

 

The Marine Diesel Mechanics Sea Phase Manual is an integral part of the training program and provides a comprehensive summary of both practical and theoretical knowledge gained while on the work term. The student must complete all applicable questions to the best of his/her ability. The student must present this Manual to the Program Chair upon completion of the work term.

Option 2: Shore-based work term

 

Students who are placed in a shore-based work term must complete a minimum of 50 days duration documented by the Marine Diesel Mechanics Workbook. Note: Students who choose this option will not be eligible for the Engine Room Rating Certificate upon graduation.

 

Marine Diesel Mechanics Workbook:

 

The Marine Diesel Mechanics Workbook is an integral part of the training program and provides a comprehensive daily log of the student’s observations and activities. The student must present this Workbook to the Program Chair upon completion of the work term.

 

WKTM 0103 (Offshore Steel Fabrication Work Term)

 

WKTM 0103 is designed to provide the student with practical experience in offshore steel fabrication. To meet the graduation requirements of the Offshore Steel Fabrication Technical Certificate Program, the student must successfully complete WKTM 0103.

 

Prerequisites - Successful completion of all Technical Session courses

 

Schedule - 80 hours

 

WKTM 1002 (Work Term - Preparation Seminar)

 

This is a short seminar course designed to prepare participants for the work term. Participants will have opportunities to develop professional work skills and techniques they will use during the work term experience.

 

Roles, Responsibilities and Benefits; The Placement Process; Work Term Procedures.

 

Duration - 6 weeks

 

Lectures - 6 hours (1 hour/week)

 

WKTM 1003 (Work Term Preparation Seminar)

 

This is a short seminar course in which participants will develop job-search skills and techniques to better enable them to secure a work term position.

 

Work Search and Networking; Preparing a Resume; Preparing a Cover Letter; Interviewing

 

Duration: 12 weeks

 

Lecture: 1 hour every second week = 6 hours total

 

WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase 1 - Nautical Science)

 

This is the first of two Sea Phases designed to ensure that the Officer Cadet gains the practical experience to become a competent ship’s officer. For most students, the first Sea Phase represents the beginning of their sea-going career and, as such, they will be expected to gain a full understanding of the vessel’s operations, safety awareness and discipline. It should be understood that by the end of their second Sea Phase the Cadet must have accumulated at least twelve (12) months of sea time in order to meet the requirements of Transport Canada’s Marine Safety Directorate. Students are expected to observe, learn, develop and adopt the high standards of professionalism expected of the ship’s officer.

 

WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase I).

 

Prerequisites - Successful completion of all Technical Session 1 courses

 

Duration - Two months (subject to placement restrictions)

 

WKTM 1103 (Work Term I - Marine Engineering)

 

WKTM 1103 is designed to ensure that the student gains practical experience under Option 1 or Option 2. Under Option 1 students begin development of the competency requirements of a Ship’s Engineering Officer; under Option 2 students gain Marine Engineering Technologist practical experience. Each successfully completed work term is regarded as one course credit. To meet the requirements for graduation from the Marine Engineering Diploma of Technology Program, the student must successfully complete a total of three (3) work terms.

 

Prerequisite - A valid seafarer’s medical certificate is required for Option 1. In addition, the student must have successfully completed the following courses before acceptance in approved work terms: MREK 2209 (Marine Engineering Knowledge IV); WKPR1200 (Fitting Shop II); WKPR 2113 (Welding Shop II); WKPR 2217 (Machine Shop III); SFTY 1114 (Basic Safety - STCW’95 VI/1); BSMG 3113 (PRM); SFTY 1106 (Marine Advanced First Aid)

 

WKTM 1105 (Remotely Operated Vehicles/Underwater Vehicles)

 

This work term is designed to ensure that the ROV/UV student gains the practical experience to become competent in ROV/UV related fields. Students will be expected to gain a full understanding of safety awareness and discipline and are expected to observe, learn, develop and adopt the high standards of professionalism expected of an ROV/UV Technician or Technologist.

 

WKTM 1105

 

Prerequisites - All Technical Session 1 Courses; All Term 4 Courses; and All Technical Session 2 Courses

 

Duration - 320 hours minimum

 

WKTM 2102 (Sea Phase 2 - Nautical Science)

 

This is the second of two Sea Phases designed to ensure that the Officer Cadet gains the practical experience to become a competent ship’s officer. It should be understood that by the end of the second Sea Phase the student must have accumulated a minimum of twelve (12) months sea time in order to meet the requirements of the program and Transport Canada’s Marine Safety Directorate. Without this sea experience the student cannot graduate.

 

Prerequisites - WKTM 1102 (Sea Phase 1) and all Technical Session 2 courses

 

WKTM 2103 (Work Term II - Marine Engineering)

 

WKTM 2103 is designed to ensure that the student gains practical experience under Option 1 or Option 2. Under Option 1 students continue development of the competency requirements of a Ship’s Engineering Officer; under Option 2 students gain additional Marine Engineering Technologist practical experience. Each successfully completed work term is regarded as one course credit. To meet the requirements for graduation from the Marine Engineering Diploma of Technology Program, the student must successfully complete a total of three (3) work terms.

 

Prerequisites - A valid seafarer’s medical certificate is required for Option 1. In addition, the student must have successfully completed the following courses before acceptance in approved work terms: MREK 3107 (Marine Engineering Knowledge V); WKTM 1103 (Work Term I).

 

Duration - Option 1: Students must complete a minimum of 70 days of Transport Canada certified sea time and achieve the articulated evaluation in order to meet WKTM 2103 requirements.

 

Option 2: Students complete a minimum 10-week work term in marine related, shore-based companies.

 

WKTM 2106 (Work Term - Marine Environmental)

 

The work term provides students with an opportunity to learn, develop, and practice high standards of professional behaviour and performance while in the work environment.

 

WKTM 2106 (Work Term - Marine Environmental Technology).

 

Prerequisites -WKTM 1003 (Work Term Preparation Seminar); MENV 1102 (Marine Environmental); All Technical Session 1 Courses; All Term 4 courses

 

Duration - 8 weeks (Students are available from mid-May to the end of August)

 

WKTM 2107 (Work Term - Food Technology)

 

The work term provides students with an opportunity to learn, develop, and practice high standards of professional behaviour and performance while in the work environment.

 

WKTM 2107 (Work Term - Food Technology).

 

Prerequisites - Clear Standing (CL) or better in the academic semester immediately prior to the work term semester. WKTM 1003 (Work Term Preparation Seminar); MATH 1101 (Introduction to Calculus); FDTE 2112 (Food Sanitation); BIOL 2102 (Microbiology) or BIOL 2105 (Microbiology)

 

Duration - 8 weeks (Students are available from mid-May to the end of August)

 

WKTM 3103 (Work Term III - Marine Engineering)

 

WKTM 3103 is designed to ensure that the student gains practical experience under Option 1 or Option 2. Under Option 1 students continue development of the competency requirements of a Ship’s Engineering Officer; under Option 2 students gain additional Marine Engineering Technologist practical experience. Each successfully completed work term is regarded as one course credit. To meet the requirements for graduation from the Marine Engineering Diploma of Technology Program, the student must successfully complete a total of three (3) work terms.

 

Prerequisite - A valid seafarer’s medical certificate is required for Option 1. In addition, the student must have successfully completed the following course before acceptance in an approved work term: WKTM 2103 (Work Term 2).

 

Duration - Option 1: Students must complete a minimum of 70 days of Transport Canada certified sea time.

 

Option 2: Students complete a minimum 10-week work term in marine related, shore-based companies.

 

WKTM 3300 (Professional Orientation)

 

This course will provide students with more practical experience in the environmental field and the opportunity to further develop industry related work skills.

 

WKTM 3300 (Professional Orientation).

 

Prerequisites - WKTM 2106 AND all courses listed in: Technical Sessions II and Terms 5 and 6

 

NOTE: The appropriateness of the professional orientation placement will be determined by the Placement Officer in consultation with the Program Chair.

 

WKTM 3301 (Work Term - Food Technology)

 

This work term is intended to provide students with a second opportunity to learn, develop, and practice high standards of professional behaviour and performance while in the work environment.

 

WKTM 3301 (Work Term – Food Technology)

 

Prerequisites - Clear standing (CL) or better in the academic semester immediately prior to the work term semester. WKTM 2107 (Work Term – Food Technology)

 

Duration - 8 weeks (Students are available from early May to the end of August.)

 

WKTM 3302 (Work Term - Bachelor of Technology - Ocean Mapping)

 

This work term is designed to ensure that the Ocean Mapping student gains the practical and technical experience to become competent in the field of Ocean Mapping. Students will be expected to gain a full understanding of the acquisition, analysis, dissemination and management processes associated with ocean data through the utilization of marine surveying equipment, remote sensing technologies, geographic information systems and oceanographic instrumentation. Students are expected to observe, learn, develop and adopt the high standards of professionalism expected of an Ocean Mapping Graduate to better prepare them for an exciting and rewarding career within this sector.

 

WKTM 3302 (Work Term - Bachelor of Technology - Ocean Mapping)

 

Prerequisites - NASC 2107 ((Restricted Operator's Certificate - Maritime Commercial); SFTY 1102 (Marine Basic First Aid (STCW A-VI/1-3)); SFTY 1114(STCW Basic Safety - Regulations VI/1 & Code Section A.VI/1.2); and Either OMAP 2300 (Field Deployment and Data Collection) AND OMAP 2301 (Data Processing and Visualization) or OMAP 2302 (Ocean Mapping Field Camp II)

 

Schedule - Students are required to work a minimum of 320 hours to constitute a work term

 

WKTM 3303 (Work Term - Bachelor of Technology - Ocean Instrumentation)

 

This work term is designed to ensure that the Ocean Instrumentation (01) student gains the practical experience to become a competent marine instrumentation technologist. Students will be expected to gain a full understanding of the duties of an instrumentation technologist, safety awareness and discipline. Students are expected to observe, learn, develop and adopt the high standards of professionalism expected of an instrumentation technologist.

 

WKTM 3303 (Work Term - Bachelor of Technology (Ocean Instrumentation).

 

Prerequisites - Technical Session 3

 

Schedule - Students are required to work a minimum of 320 hours to constitute a work term.

 

WKTM 4000(Work Term Preparation Seminar)

 

This is a short seminar course in which participants will develop job-search skills and techniques to better enable them to secure a work term position.

 

Work Search and Networking; Preparing a Resume; Preparing a Cover Letter; Interviewing

 

Duration - 12 weeks

 

Lecture - 1 hour every second week = 6 hours total

 

WKTM 4000(Work Term Preparation Seminar)

 

This is a short seminar course in which participants will develop job-search skills and techniques to better enable them to secure a work term position.

 

Work Search and Networking; Preparing a Resume; Preparing a Cover Letter; Interviewing

 

Duration - 12 weeks

 

Lecture - 1 hour every second week = 6 hours total

 

WKTM 4109 (Advanced Diploma - Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management)

 

The work term provides students with an opportunity to learn, develop, and practice high standards of professional behaviour and performance while in the work environment.

 

WKTM 4109 (Work Term - Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management).

 

Prerequisites - Terms One, Two and Technical Session - Advanced Diploma in Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

WKTM 4110 (Work Term - Water Quality)

 

The work term provides students with an opportunity to learn, develop, and practice high standards of professional behaviour and performance while in the work environment.

 

WKTM 4110 (Work Term - Water Quality)

 

Prerequisites - Terms One, Two and Technical Session Advanced Diploma in Water Quality

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

WKTM 4111 (Advanced Diploma in Food Safety)

 

The work term provides students with an opportunity to learn, develop, and practice high standards of professional behaviour and performance while in the work environment. Where extenuating circumstances warrant and with the approval of the School Head, a student may be granted permission to complete a Work Term Technical Project Report in lieu of a Work Term.

 

WKTM 4111 (Work Term - Food Safety)

 

Prerequisites - Terms One and Two Advanced Diploma in Food Safety

 

Duration - 13 weeks

 

WKTM 4112 (Work Term - Advanced Diploma in Sustainable Aquaculture)

 

The work term provides students with an opportunity to learn, develop, and practice high standards of professional behaviour and performance while in the work environment.

 

WKTM 4112 (Work Term - Sustainable Aquaculture)

 

Prerequisites - Terms One and Two Advanced Diploma in Sustainable Aquaculture

 

Duration - 13 week