Our Team

Rob Brown
Rob Brown

Rob Brown
Research Scientist

Rob Brown is a research scientist with a Ph.D. in from the University of Greenwich (UK) in human performance and evacuation modelling for large passenger ships. Rob has led research at the OSSC since 2003 and during this time his role has included coordination, conduct and management of projects ranging from model scale laboratory-based testing to ethics approved human performance research at full scale. Rob’s research also involves studying thermal protection of individuals in survival situations and the performance of emergency locator beacons in rough sea conditions. A Professional Engineer (naval architecture), Rob is an associate member of the Royal Institute of Naval Architects and was recently awarded the James M. Flaherty Research Scholarship from the Ireland Canada University Foundation, with the assistance of the Government of Canada/avec l’appui du gouvernement du Canada to develop a Canadian/Irish research network in passenger ship safety.

Kerri-Ann Evely

Kerri-Ann Evely
Marine Safety Researcher

Kerri-Ann Ennis is a human factors researcher with the unit and holds a Master of Science (Kinesiology - Effects of Floor Insulation and Clothing Wetness on Thermal Response of Life Raft Occupants Exposed to Cold) from Memorial University. Prior to joining the team at OSSC in 2010, Ennis was the human factors research coordinator with the Small Craft Simulation Project at Memorial University. Kerri-Ann has practical small craft experience as a past employee of the Canadian Coast Guard - Inshore Rescue Boat Program and has research experience in the areas of maritime safety and survival, human thermal physiology, small craft simulation training and helicopter underwater escape.

Greg Harvey

Greg Harvey
Instructor

Greg Harvey is an instructor with the Offshore Safety and Survival Centre at the Marine Institute. He has been involved in the delivery of marine safety and survival training including helicopter underwater escape training with the Marine Institute for the past 27 years.

He holds train the trainer certificates in shark re-breather emergency breathing system (Humberside Offshore Training Association) and aircraft ditching/emergency breathing system (Survival Systems Training Limited). In conjunction with his work experience with the Marine Institute he has 30 years experience as a commercial diver and dive supervisor.

Harvey holds certificates in commercial mixed gas diver and dive supervisor. He currently sits on the Canadian Standards Association subcommittees for diver competency and diver training, the provincial Workplace Health and Safety Compensation Commission Diving-Technical Advisory committee and the Canadian General Standards Board committee for helicopter passenger transportation suit systems.

Heather Carnahan

Heather Carnahan
Cross Appointed Professor

Heather Carnahan has a Ph.D. in Kinesiology from the University of Waterloo and is currently the Dean of the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation at Memorial University, and also holds a cross appointment at the Offshore Safety and Survival Centre at the Marine Institute. Prior to this she was the Interim Vice-President of Education at Women’s College Hospital and the inaugural Director of the Centre for Ambulatory Care Education at the University of Toronto. Heather also held the BMO Chair in Health Professions Education Research at the Wilson Centre while at the University of Toronto.

Her research involves applying current motor control and learning theory to studying the acquisition and retention of technical skills in various real life domains such as safety and survival skills associated with marine transport, aviation, zero gravity environments, and health care.

Elizabeth Sanli

Elizabeth Sanli
Postdoctoral Fellow

Liz Sanli is a Postdoctoral Fellow with Ocean Safety Research. Her current research projects examine the acquisition, retention, and performance of safety and survival skills in marine and offshore contexts. She is also involved in projects investigating the influence of cold and wet environments on the performance of skilled actions.

Liz’s research expertise includes the understanding of practice and training contexts and how they relate to learning and performance. Recent publications have presented work examining the role of errors, task difficulty, and motivation in performance and learning of motor skills. She regularly presents her work at national and international conferences.
Liz completed her Bachelor of Kinesiology and her Master of Science in Applied Health Science (Kinesiology) degrees from Brock University in 2007 and 2009, followed by her PhD in Kinesiology from McMaster University in 2013. Since then Liz has taught graduate-level courses in motor behavior and motor learning, and co-taught a health science education course. Liz has served as a MSc. supervisory committee member in the department of Kinesiology at McMaster University. At the undergraduate level she has taught introductory and advanced motor control and learning as well as human factors and ergonomics courses.

Liz’s expertise in motor learning has led to consulting opportunities in high-level sport and educational publishing contexts, as well as invited lectures and workshops on topics including research methods and adapted physical education. She reviews for several journals in the motor behavior and skill acquisition domains.

Matthew Ray

Matthew Ray
Postdoctoral Fellow

Matthew Ray is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the research unit. He is currently the lead on a research program that investigates how the wet and cold environment, experienced by those working offshore, influences people’s ability to perform skilled actions with their hands. In addition, Matthew is a co-investigator for series of projects that look at the acacquisition and retention of safety and survival skills. Matthew also has expertise in perception and action and has published research on topics such as: the selection and planning of multi-person actions, the distribution of attention in social situations, action-centered attention and human computer interaction.

Matthew’s research career began in 2005 with the Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience lab at the University of Calgary. Since then Matthew completed his MSc from the Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of Calgary and his Phd from the Graduate Department of Exercise Science at the University of Toronto. Matthew has presented his research at both national and international conferences and has won numerous awards and distinctions for his academic work. He is currently a reviewer for the Journal of Motor Behaviour, Human Movement Science and the Journal of Sport Sciences.

Desmond Mulligan

Desmond Mulligan
Postdoctoral Fellow

Desmond Mulligan has a PhD in Kinesiology from the University of British Columbia. His academic background spans areas of software engineering, experimental cognitive psychology, and kinesiology. His research has focused on areas of decision-making, motor skill acquisition, and expertise, in dynamic environments. He has investigated perceptual-cognitive aspects of decision-making in sports environments, where he designed and developed training simulations to advance perceptual and motor skill acquisition in ice hockey. More recently, Dr. Mulligan’s research examined the role that motor areas of the brain play in action perception, and, specifically, the idea that humans use these motor areas to internally simulate observed actions in order to predict their outcomes. He has designed and taught courses in Human-Computer Interaction and Cognition, Motor Behaviour, Interaction Design, Cognitive Psychology, Data Structures and Software Engineering, and The History and Theory of Technology and Culture.

Des is currently the principal investigator on a project that explores the role of interpersonal coordination mechanisms in team performance. Specifically, voice analysis techniques are used to measure team communication skills during emergency situations in extreme environments. The goal is to develop a novel measure of team cooperation, and a framework for the design and assessment of training systems that facilitate efficient group coordination under emergency conditions.